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Pigeon-toedness and turning

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I went skiing a few weeks ago for the first time in at least four years.  It was only the second or third time I'd been on actual skis; my first experience on the slopes was an epic snowboard fail, followed by a few runs on those small blade skis.  I love the blades, but I rent and now I can't find them, so regular skis it is.

 

As the subject indicates, I noticed two things, but I don't know how related they might be.

 

1. When my friends and I rode the lift, my skis naturally turned toes out while theirs stayed straight.  I walk a little pigeon-toed normally; I don't know about them.  But I've walked this way for as long as I can remember, and I don't recall my skis ever sticking out like that.  Maybe it's just gotten worse, but is it at all possible for equipment to be adjusted in a way that limits the effect of this?  This also led to the rear of the skis clipping each other when I tried moving around on flat areas.

 

2. I can't turn right to save my life.  When I did a green run it was ok because the turns were not at all demanding, but the one time I tried a blue it was a clusterfk.  I'm slower to get into the right turn, and my speed picked up incredibly fast on the steeper slope, so that within a second or two I hit a speed that I didn't approach when making a left turn.  Every time I lost control until I fell partway down the hill and lost skis and/or poles and/or my hat.  I read a lot of general turning tips, but is it at all common to have trouble turning one way, and are there any tips helpful for solving that problem apart from the generic ones?

post #2 of 7

Hi Spiffy,

 

First, the issue of the skis pointing out while sitting on the chair:  this is very normal.  Infact, if this didnt happen, that would be weird.

 

Second, the issue of trouble turning to one side: this is also very normal.  Most of us can turn one way better then the other.  I am not sure all the science behind it, but for example I know that I can right my name with my right hand perfectley, with my left, it would be barely legible. 

 

To fix, without some video its impossible to say for sure.   But generally speaking all the general tips apply.  My advice thou: for your turns to the right, just try to exaggerate all the moves you make when going left.   

 

Good luck.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

So the fact that my friends both had their skis pointed perfectly straight is odd?  That's the thing that caught my attention in the first place.

 

If I had video I'd post it for comedy's sake.  The best way I can explain the problem is that I just can't get my right ski to turn.  When I turn left, I can swivel that ski around fine.  In fact, I can make that turn smoothly to the point that I had issues overdoing it and sometimes pointed my skis back up the hill because I was paranoid about making it around far enough.  But when I turn right, the right ski just sticks, like it catches on the snow, and sends me straight downhill.  Once I had my issue on the blue, I stayed on greens the rest of the day; my intention was to go back to blue when I could comfortably get that ski to move whenever I wanted it to, but I never managed it.  Even though I could fly down the greens, turning right always had that issue.  It just wasn't enough to crash me on a green, because I had time to unstick it.  I hope that makes sense.

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiffyMcBang View Post

So the fact that my friends both had their skis pointed perfectly straight is odd?  That's the thing that caught my attention in the first place.

 

Yes.

 

Just google "chairlift ski" and look at the "images".  Everyone is duck footed when the their feet hang.

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiffyMcBang View Post
If I had video I'd post it for comedy's sake.  The best way I can explain the problem is that I just can't get my right ski to turn.  When I turn left, I can swivel that ski around fine.  In fact, I can make that turn smoothly to the point that I had issues overdoing it and sometimes pointed my skis back up the hill because I was paranoid about making it around far enough.  But when I turn right, the right ski just sticks, like it catches on the snow, and sends me straight downhill.  Once I had my issue on the blue, I stayed on greens the rest of the day; my intention was to go back to blue when I could comfortably get that ski to move whenever I wanted it to, but I never managed it.  Even though I could fly down the greens, turning right always had that issue.  It just wasn't enough to crash me on a green, because I had time to unstick it.  I hope that makes sense.

 

Yes...it could be a few things.  But I suspect its either:

 

A) you are rushing the turns to the right - meaning you start to "lean in" too soon, hence the ski goes on edge and becomes very difficult (read impossible) to twist on the snow.  To fix...be patient, stand tall over the outside ski, so the ski is "flattish" on the snow...and turn.  A flattish ski will turn much easier.

 

B) you are not getting your hips up over your feet - meaning your femurs are "horizontal-ish" meaning you cant turn the ski without the tail grabbing.  To fix...be patient, stand tall, so your hips are over your feet...and turn the ski. 

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiffyMcBang View Post

So the fact that my friends both had their skis pointed perfectly straight is odd?  That's the thing that caught my attention in the first place.

Not really odd. If you sit down naturally they won't be straight, but if you place your knees close together they will. I do that when I'm in inside position of a full chair so I don't bump skis with others.
post #6 of 7

OP, mine are by far the most "outward-pointing" of anyone no matter who I ride a chairlift with. So much so that I have to be conscientious when passing the poles holding the lift cable sometimes so they don't catch. I walk with my toes pointed out a bit too, gotta love genetics!
 

post #7 of 7

The more tired I am later in the day, the more my skis point out when riding the lift.  30 years and I still have a favored side when turning some.  If I'm going to throw an emergency hockey stop at high speed I will usually put my stronger (right) leg downhill if I have enough room to turn to that side.  We do drills to strengthen our weaker sides but there will always be a weaker side.

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