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Looking to improve- MA please!

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello,

I posted a couple of videos of me making some turns on a firm groomer and on some moguls.  The videos are short and not great, but I am hoping there is enough there to evaluate.  Please don’t hold back (as I know you won’t J).  I am always trying to improve, and looking for any and all feedback.  This is the first time I have seen myself skiing on video, and I can tell you even I can see things that ain’t right.  Looking forward to your analysis and suggestions on how to fix the bad and the ugly-.  Thanks in advance!

 

Short turns

http://youtu.be/0BU1085nItI

 

Short turns and moguls

 http://youtu.be/9idHZ4Wm7wo

 

About me:  53, 5’6”/130lb, been skiing ~25 years, ~15 days per season (but going for 30 this year), on Blizzard Magnum 8.1 Ti 165cm

post #2 of 10

Your absorption is lacking in the moguls, but I don't think you will be able to successfully absorb unless you move your hips forward.  With the way you're skiing now, getting lower at the tops of bumps will only make you more backseat. 

 

Read this if you want.  It'll tell you how to absorb or something.  http://www.epicski.com/t/112838/a-thing-i-wrote-on-mogul-absorption

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Blake, thanks for the critique!  I had read your description before, but had a hard time understanding the backwards pedaling thing, so I just now re-read it.  I got on my back on the edge of the bed and tried the backpedaling motion, and it now makes perfect sense.  I have actually felt that sensation once or twice while playing in the bumps.  I will be skiing this weekend, so I plan to do some traversing runs on a mogul field, and will practice absorption and getting the hips more forward.

 

Loved your video- impressive skiing!
 

post #4 of 10

If you look at the first video at about the 10-12 second mark, it looks like the pivot point for your rotation is the tips of your skis, not the middle.  Instead of the windshield wiper motion you are making, think about rotating from the middle of the foot so that both your tips and tails rotate more equally.  If you were to rotate standing still, the pattern your ski (or boot if you do it with your skis off) should make is that of a bow tie,

 

It would be interesting to see you do pivot slips (or even 360s) to see if you can keep them in a narrow corridor.  Doing railroad tracks would let you see what the other end of the spectrum feels like (aka no rotation).  

 

Better video might make more it easier for more useful feedback.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

MEfree, thanks for your feedback.  I was trying to pressure the ski with the whole foot, instead of pushing with the heel (bad habit from the straight ski days), but yep, sure looks like I was doing the windshield wiper thing in that video segment.  I will add pivot slips/360s to my list of excersizes for this weekend.  Never tried these drills before, but they look interesting.

post #6 of 10

I am surprised/disappointed you havent gotten more feedback on this.  I have been holding off on posting until others chimed in...but it looks like this is all you are going to get.

 

I agree, with the assessment of the above two...they are correct on your symptoms.  But you need to get to the root cause.

 

In your groomed video, as MF30 correctly points out your pivot point is way forward.  This reduces your carving to just a series of edge sets.  The root cause of this is you are too far forward at the start of the turn, this is caused by your cranked (fully flexed) ankles.  Your ankles need to move.  Extend or straighten the ankles/knees/hips as you come from skis flat....you achieve this by pushing down on the ball of the foot (the rest of the joints will naturally follow), like pushing down on the gas pedal in your car.  This will apply tip pressure, without moving your COM way forward, and allow the skis pivot point to be under your foot.  Once you have established the platform, and the loads are starting to build...you can now flex the ankle/knee/hip as required to complete the turn...repeat.

 

Interestingly thou..in the bumps, you have the same (but opposite) problem.  Your ankle is again locked, but this time in the open position.  You also switch to this stance as you ski up to the camera in one of the groomer clips.  This is no doubt a learned adjustment to ski bumps...because if you tackled the bumps with the cranked ankles, you would well and truly end up going over the handlebars as you impact the mogul faces. 

 

The fix here is, the same as above....as you approach the mogul face.."anticpate" the impact by being tall and pushing your feet forward...this is not the same as leaning back!  As you impact the bump, allow the ankle/knee/hip to flex to absorb the mogul...when you hit the top of the bump, you should be "more or less" stacked with a "neutral fore/aft position"...as you pass over the crest of the bump...extend your ankles/knees/hips as on the groom, by pushing down on the ball of the foot..this will get your tips down, and engaged earlier so you can carve down the back side of the bump and into the next one...repeat. 

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Skidude,
Thanks for the response!

I just got back from a 3-day skiing weekend... finally convinced myself to take a lesson for the first time. The group lesson that I signed for  turned out to be a private lesson, since I was the only one at my level biggrin.gif.  I asked for a mogul lesson, and the instructor took me through a progression of fundamental skiing skills, gradually building to skiing moguls. Man did I learn a lot!  

 

 

 

"you achieve this by pushing down on the ball of the foot (the rest of the joints will naturally follow), like pushing down on the gas pedal in your car"

 

By this, do you mean pushing down with the uphill foot to extend the uphill leg to start the turn?  My instructor had me do just that, in order to open up the ankle and help initiate the next turn.  This was a very foreign concept to me at first (pushing off with the uphill foot), and took a while to wrap my head around.  I practiced doing that, instead of making the "unweighting" motion that I was doing before, and it sure took a lot less work, got my hips forward, and got the next edge set started gradually.  I need to keep practicing, but I think I understand now... extend, then starting with open ankle, slowly flex into the turn.

 

 

Quote:

Interestingly thou..in the bumps, you have the same (but opposite) problem.  Your ankle is again locked, but this time in the open position.  You also switch to this stance as you ski up to the camera in one of the groomer clips.  This is no doubt a learned adjustment to ski bumps...because if you tackled the bumps with the cranked ankles, you would well and truly end up going over the handlebars as you impact the mogul faces. 

 

The fix here is, the same as above....as you approach the mogul face.."anticpate" the impact by being tall and pushing your feet forward...this is not the same as leaning back!  As you impact the bump, allow the ankle/knee/hip to flex to absorb the mogul...when you hit the top of the bump, you should be "more or less" stacked with a "neutral fore/aft position"...as you pass over the crest of the bump...extend your ankles/knees/hips as on the groom, by pushing down on the ball of the foot..this will get your tips down, and engaged earlier so you can carve down the back side of the bump and into the next one...repeat. 

 

In the moguls, I practiced pushing off with the uphill ball of the foott/toes to initiate the next turn, and it sure has helped a lot with getting my hips more forward.  Another mental prompt for me is to reach with the pole plant and pull the hips towards the hand, again helping with getting the hips forward.  

One thing I didn't quite get is the pushing your feet forward bit.  My instructor told me the same thing, but it just didn't register.  Is this more of an anticipation (mental image) than an action?

 

To sum it up: after starting this thread, reading the feedback, and (finally!) taking a lesson, my skiing is definitely getting better.  There is a lot of practice ahead, and I am looking forward to it.  Can't wait to get back on the mountain in 2 weeks!

 

Again, thanks for the responses.  I look forward to updating this thread in the future with a better video of an an improved skier.

 

 

 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by pointemdown View Post

By this, do you mean pushing down with the uphill foot to extend the uphill leg to start the turn?

 

 

Well both feet actually...but it will certainly feel more pronounced on the "outside" foot, as that is where the bulk of your weight is.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pointemdown View Post

One thing I didn't quite get is the pushing your feet forward bit.  My instructor told me the same thing, but it just didn't register.  Is this more of an anticipation (mental image) than an action?

 

 

Yes.

post #9 of 10

Hey pointem, was it Mammoth where you had the lesson? I see your a socal res. Ill be up there for the 1st week of April and hoping to do the same thing ie. group lesson becoming a private or near private. I did that a couple years ago but wasn't too happy with the instructor. If it was Mammoth, who was your instructor? thanks

agreen

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Agreen,

Yes, Mammoth.  I signed up for the afternoon session last Friday, thinking that most would want the morning session.  It turned out to be a good call since the moguls would have been too icy in the morning anyway.  Also, where you start the lesson makes a difference.  I did mine out of Canyon Lodge, and I found out later from a friend who is buddies with an instructor that there are a lot of good instructors at Canyon vs Main Lodge, and they apparently only teach out of one or the other, not both.  Another friend had a lesson out of main lodge, and her instructor was more race-oriented than off-piste.  I don't know if I just got lucky, but my instructor was off-piste oriented, but I did ask for mogul instruction when I called to sign up, so maybe that made a difference.  If you go mid-week there is a very good chance you will be the only student.

 

My instructor's name was Joshua.  He is a PSIA level 3 and I recommend him highly.

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