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Old patrol toboggan, new ideas?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I am a student at Art Center College of Design located in Pasadena, California. I am designing a new patrol toboggan breaking the old toboggan and needed some first hand testimony.

I want to know what are some horrid issues?

Areas needed improvement?

Or shoot me an email at daklasiq@gmail.com.

Thank you,

Greg.

post #2 of 19

Can you make them lighter?

 

And with cup holders?

post #3 of 19

handle hinge pins?  Make them quick easy and fail safe.

 

Load Straps   is there a faster, easier to operate in the ice  buckle?

 

Can you make them glide in deep wet snow?  And keep the slegs hard down on icey runs?

 

Handle locks that don't foul a 6 foot plus "passenger".  ratchets?

 

Self stow and self deploy "snow spray" guard and friction chain.   (Ohhh!  Techno!)

 

"hangers" for chair transport back up the mountain that don't require four clasps on to buried in ice and snow rings.

 

All these comments referenced to the wonderfully useful Cascade equipment.

post #4 of 19
I would love to see some adjustability of the locked handle height

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post #5 of 19
I think you guys scared away the art and design student with all your engineering problems.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I think you guys scared away the art and design student with all your engineering problems.

nope... I'm still reading this thread!

post #7 of 19

Carbon fiber body, carbon fiber handles. Under 40 pounds.
 

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 

ok... carbon fiber body, carbon fiber handles it is... but not sure about bein less than 40lbs

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I think you guys scared away the art and design student with all your engineering problems.

 

I think you don't know the scope of what industrial/product designer's and industrial/product design students do. smile.gif

post #10 of 19
I was just joking on the lack of response from OP at that point.
post #11 of 19
Would Kevlar make for a lighter, stronger sled?
post #12 of 19

I like the design of the Edge Rescue sleds. They're lighter and more maneuverable than the Cascade 100 is, and seem to handle the wide variations in snow conditions that we get out here in the PacNW very well.

 

Cgrandy - they also address some of the issues you mentioned. The handle locking mechanism acts as somewhat of a spray guard, and Edge actually makes a spray guard panel that can be attached to the handles between the crossbars. The chair hangers are also a pretty clever design that hooks around the crossbars, and eliminates the need for the hook/ring connections. The chain brake system isn't exactly "self-deploying", but it does deploy a little better than Cascade's does (you'll never accidentally drop it into the nose of the sled, as I have seen happen with the Cascade). Edge's "On-The-Fly" system uses bungee cord and you can loop the cord back over the y-grip to have it retract by itself once you pull the nose of the sled up high enough off the snow.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thank you, Mike Kurfis.

The Edge Rescue sleds did everything I wanted to do.

Thank you non-the-less.

Greg.

post #14 of 19

More side cut and rocker design. 

 

Seriously its very important to have all the SAME toboggans on the hill.   Our mountain newbie PD purchased two cheap sleds one year.  They had a completely different feel which was good and bad.  The worse part is they ran differently and you needed to get use to them.  Having a mountain with 5 different sled designs would be a disaster. 
 

post #15 of 19

Edge?

 

How is the handle position secured?  Pressing down/ lifting up is useful for speed management.I want that handle stiff!  No  bannana boats!

How is the handle folded back for storage with that spray flap in place?  Some sort of quick disconnect?

 

That chain deploy mechanism does not excite me at all.  I always stop for route selection when considering the chain.

 

I like the open scoop back!  Tall patients would be easy,  but...sled packs might find their way out a bit more frequently ;-)

 

The web site could use a little developement

post #16 of 19

Sorry it took so long to reply here. I didn't set up notifications... :(

 

Yeah, the Edge Rescue web site needs work. Lots of work. There's more pictures and stuff on their facebook page.

 

The spray flap that I think you're talking about is actually the locking mechanism. It just happens to work out that it serves as spray protection. It folds down into the nose of the sled, and the handles fold back flat on the sled just like the Cascades do. They're pretty stiff, compared to the Cascade 100, in my opinion. You just have to be careful about being too far out on the handles when you push down, since it will rock up and lift the skegs out of the snow if you do that. Sled packs - I've never lost one. We use the aft patient strap to hold the pack in place, and that works well.

 

Come out to Mt. Hood in the summer (usually the first weekend in June) for Nuts & Bolts, and you'll get a chance to play with the Edge! :)  

 

I know Toby (the owner), and he has said in the past that he wants to get out to the northeast to see if there's interest out there (my old stomping grounds; used to race for Smuggs in the '80s), but I haven't talked to him to see if he's going to go out there this season.

post #17 of 19

Metal flake and pinstripe paint job.

post #18 of 19

A brake on the horns which you could activate with gloved hands ... and so you would not have to turn around and pull the chain on and off.

 

Also, some better way to carry them on the lift. When I junior patrolled our mountain had all Riblet chairs, so sitting on the side, holding the rig, and getting around the center pole were a pain.

 

Since you asked -- why not closed foam or gel on the side that sits on your thighs as you carry it on the lift?

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudcult View Post
 

A brake on the horns which you could activate with gloved hands ... and so you would not have to turn around and pull the chain on and off.

 

Run a rope from the chain up to the horns that you grasp while running - releasing the rope drops the chain, pulling on it lifts it up and forward.  Apologies if I misunderstood and you're talking about something else.  

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by cloudcult View Post
 

...Also, some better way to carry them on the lift. When I junior patrolled our mountain had all Riblet chairs, so sitting on the side, holding the rig, and getting around the center pole were a pain.

 

Ever tried these?

 

http://www.cascade-rescue.com/products/Cascade-Toboggan-Sled-Loader.html

 

Shown here, after the lap-load:

 

Except where I work the patroller sits to the outside so they can bail if things go bad at the offload ramp.  

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