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Base edge burrs/nicks

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I'm still pretty new to DIY tuning and from what I have read it is best to totally leave the base edge alone once it has been set correctly after a base grind in order to not end up with a base high ski. I work out any burrs from impact damage on the side edge but are burrs/nicks in the base edge ok to just be left alone? Would alu oxide and then ceramic stones be ok to use? Reading around it sounds like any burrs are very bad for edge hold on ice.

post #2 of 21
removing base edge nicks is a good thing to do regularly. its preferrable to work JUST the area with the burr...personally, i use a swix t240 dual sided pocket stone (lubricated) for this. freehand, with light pressure. dark half of this stone for larger burrs, lighter half for smaller ones...

zenny
post #3 of 21

I clean up nicks and dings in the base edge with my diamond stones, usually a 200 and a 600. I try to ease the area I worked into the rest of the base edge with lighter pressure as I move further away. When I do that often enough, it is time for a grind.

post #4 of 21

I ignore nicks in the base edge completely and work only the side edge. I have found you do more harm than good.

unless you had a fairly sharp piece of metal sticking out from the base edge.

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

I ignore nicks in the base edge completely and work only the side edge. I have found you do more harm than good.

unless you had a fairly sharp piece of metal sticking out from the base edge.

Yea, pretty much that's what I do.

I may drag the file in the 1 degree base guide over it to knock off the high spots. Don't put pressure on the guide as you drag it.

 

After I use the Ski Visions base flattener, (which I only use before waxing), I'll drag the file in the 1 degree base guide to make sure nothing is sticking up that may scratch the iron, then do the edges, then wax.

 

My Volkl Kendo's have over 80 day's on them and have never been to a shop for a grind. The ski visions tool works great.

 

When I feel it start to hit the edges I stop using it and then tune the edges, then wax.

 

My bases don't look perfect, but the skis glide better then most. It's about having wax in them not looking pretty.

post #6 of 21

Just knock down the burr with a wet stone not a metal file or diamond file, because you'll just ruin them.  Moderate even pressure and just work at it slowly.

post #7 of 21

I'd like to know if methods are regional, having to do with the rocky-ness of said mountain. If you get several nicks per day compared to a couple every 5 days of skiing.

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I'd like to know if methods are regional, having to do with the rocky-ness of said mountain. If you get several nicks per day compared to a couple every 5 days of skiing.

You should watch where your skiing, if your getting that many nicks from hitting rocks.

post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

You should watch where your skiing, if your getting that many nicks from hitting rocks.


You could ski groomers and keep the edges very nice, but....

the rest of the mountain, if it is rock, cliff, and scree, and not grass and dirt like some ski areas, is always going to have rock hidden just about everywhere.

thanks for the tip though,   rolleyes.gif , and emoticon on your comment could negate the "are you kidding me" emoticon here.

post #10 of 21

What are you a curator?  Ski the bottoms and edges off of them. biggrin.gif

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


You could ski groomers and keep the edges very nice, but....

the rest of the mountain, if it is rock, cliff, and scree, and not grass and dirt like some ski areas, is always going to have rock hidden just about everywhere.

thanks for the tip though,   rolleyes.gif , and emoticon on your comment could negate the "are you kidding me" emoticon here.


No I was pretty serious. My friends and I know where it's safe to ski when the conditions get iffy. But that's what happens when you ski at the same mountain for 20 years. Last Thursday a buddy and I when down the headwall that was more rock the snow. We picked are way thru with no damage. After that I showed him the duck the rope way thru the trees around the headwall where there's better snow.

 

;)

post #12 of 21

Extremely light pass with a file in the same fixture used to set the base and edge angles just in the spot where the damage is.  Problem gone, no additional cutting on the base or edge occures.

 

Not trying to remove material just damage as required. 

post #13 of 21
I use a stone in a base edge guide or simply a gummy on the affected area. I'm just looking to take off the 'outy' part. The 'inny' part will wait for the next grind to get smoothed out.

I think a file is to aggressive for this type of work. It would take a long long time with a medium or fine stone to remove what a file might take in a single pass.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

I use a stone in a base edge guide or simply a gummy on the affected area. I'm just looking to take off the 'outy' part. The 'inny' part will wait for the next grind to get smoothed out.

I think a file is to aggressive for this type of work. It would take a long long time with a medium or fine stone to remove what a file might take in a single pass.

That seems sensible. I hit too many rocks to just leave the base edge alone altogether. If you ski natural snow terrain in the east, it's gonna happen.
post #15 of 21
Are there any good how to videos on YouTube in this area ? Sometimes it's easier to see rather than read about it
post #16 of 21

   Use a stone, not a file. Many of these burrs will be hardened (because of the heat generated during "impact") to the point where a file woun't be able to remove them...'cause they're harder than the file.

 

    zenny

post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


That seems sensible. I hit too many rocks to just leave the base edge alone altogether. If you ski natural snow terrain in the east, it's gonna happen.

 

That is pretty much where I am, 'just leave it' isn't really an option and damage is a fact of life.

post #18 of 21

As long as you plane the bases to prevent too big of a base bevel, I see no problem with sharpening the base edge. Nice and smooth edges, side and base. A chrome plated file can slice off any nick. or imperfection. Polish with a diamond stone. You could take it to a mirror finish if you wanted too. Like Max Capacity said, that ski visions tool does a good job. Takes a while to learn how to use though. I think people are over reacting about shortening the life of a ski by over tuning. If your not changing bevels or structures, you don't take off much material.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiTunes View Post

As long as you plane the bases to prevent too big of a base bevel, I see no problem with sharpening the base edge. Nice and smooth edges, side and base. A chrome plated file can slice off any nick. or imperfection. Polish with a diamond stone. You could take it to a mirror finish if you wanted too. Like Max Capacity said, that ski visions tool does a good job. Takes a while to learn how to use though. I think people are over reacting about shortening the life of a ski by over tuning. If your not changing bevels or structures, you don't take off much material.


You don't use a file to remove case hardened nicks, it's harder than the metal of the file and will just dull and/or destroy the file, It should be done with a Stone.  Personally I would NEVER take a file to the base edge like that just for some little imperfections.

post #20 of 21

 

chrome plated, This is a picture of my shop and I'm tuning right now. Right Bench, center customers, center left green wintersteiger stone grinder, center left,hidden. grindrite side edger, center right front grindrite belt sander and  grindrite stone grinder, left, wintersteiger ceramic side edger. I operate, maintain, adjust, and use these machines. the best way to remove a hardened raised burr is with a chrome plated file. All roads lead to chrome.


Edited by HiTunes - 3/30/13 at 11:52am
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiTunes View Post

 

chrome plated, This is a picture of my shop and I'm tuning right now. Right Bench, center customers, center left green wintersteiger stone grinder, center left,hidden. grindrite side edger, center right front grindrite belt sander and  grindrite stone grinder, left, wintersteiger ceramic side edger. I operate, maintain, adjust, and use these machines. the best way to remove a hardened raised burr is with a chrome plated file. All roads lead to chrome.

    I prefer a Swix T240 dual sided pocket stone (freehand, wet) for base edge burrs as it makes it easier for me to isolate the damage and to manage pressure--although, as I'm sure you know, 20 race techs will invariably say 20 different things (about 1 thingbiggrin.gifwink.gif...

 

    zenny

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