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Hip rotation in short radius turns

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

how much effort, if any, do you think you should put in rotating at the hips (femur rotation) for short radius turns in difficult heavy snow?   Should most of the effort come from steering the feet or is hip rotation important as well?  I find i can make these turns faster and easier by enaging the hips but at the cost of more upper body movement.  any thoughts?

 

thanks

post #2 of 9

When the conditions get sticky I definitely find that I engage my hips to drive the skis a little more, except there are ways to do it with minimal upper body rotation.

post #3 of 9

Lasher, for me it depends a lot on the slope. If it's steep enough and there's enough energy available to put into the ski, tipping and pressuring the new outside ski at the top of the turn does the job with minimal-to-zero rotation.  If it's a milder slope, a tip of both skis and a limited amount of femur-socket rotation seems to get the results I like, especially for very short wedeln-type turns.

 

For showing off on a very mild slope, femur-socket rotation seems just right, provided I am on packed snow.  For mashed potatoes or other varieties of crud, all bets are off.

 

That's just my personal experience.  I look forward to reactions from guys with more know-how than I have.  Plenty of them on here.

 

JoeB

Rossi 82Ti

Dynastar SkiCross 9

Volkl 5 Star

post #4 of 9

Quiet upper body, facing down the fall line, keep the shoulders on the same plane as the horizon. It all happens from the waist down, use your knees and your forward pressure to roll the ankles and balls of your feet to steer the skis.

 

Try to slow it down and be controlled. I try to make all my short radius turns as if I was skiing in a 10ft wide or less chute. It's a good exercise.

post #5 of 9

Ha! I notice that all the posters are on the east coast.  Out west where we all ski with nice wide, rockered skis there is no such thing as difficult heavy snow. (You can call me a troll if you like).

post #6 of 9

Thinking more about the movement.the down hill thigh leads into the next turn.

 

Do you see the tips of your skis in your goggles ? I you do, your not up and forward enough.

 

You can't do short radius turns efficiently from the back seat.

 

Are you standing on your toes when doing this ?

 

Remember, the upper body is very quiet. Hands out in front, the up hill had should be at least over the up hill ski ready for the next turn on a little wider short turn, when your letting the skis run across the hill 10-20ft or more.

 

There are a lot of pieces to the puzzle of a short radius turn.

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by toddlasher View Post

how much effort, if any, do you think you should put in rotating at the hips (femur rotation) for short radius turns in difficult heavy snow?   Should most of the effort come from steering the feet or is hip rotation important as well?  I find i can make these turns faster and easier by enaging the hips but at the cost of more upper body movement.  any thoughts?

 

thanks

 

Foot steering is femoral rotation. 

post #8 of 9
It all starts from the feet up.
post #9 of 9

Best way to learn short turns, join in one of the EPICSKI training trips.

 

I was lucky enough to go to Stowe a few years back and spend two day's with Mike Rogan.

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