EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › After five years of renting skis, I think its about time to commit. Help me choose?
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After five years of renting skis, I think its about time to commit. Help me choose?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Figured I'd start with the 5 questions ...

 

 

Where in the world are you skiing? 

primarily east coast. I live in Jersey, so my usual haunts are Camelback, Hunter, and Bellayre. Usually ski a few days out west every year. 

What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)

I wouldn't necessarily use the word prefer, but I have a much easier time on groomed and slightly icier conditions. I try to do a bit of everything though, especially when I leave my local area. Well, besides the terrain park. Fresh powdery snow is fun, but hard to ski in. I was hoping slightly wider skis would help here. 

How many days a year do you ski?

every year, I try to get a dozen days at least. Most of them are spent at local mountains, but I do make at least one big trip every year, to get a few days at places I haven't skied before. 

How advanced are you as a skier?

feels like it depends on conditions, really. I can ski all the black/double black trails around me competently enough, I have a bad time with moguls though, doubly so in powder. Glades are difficult as well, as they're basically soft mogully runs with the added fun of obstacles to crash into. My biggest problem right now though, is that deep snow leaves me feeling like I'm learning to ski for the first time. I keep digging in to the powder and losing my balance any time I hit bumpy terrain. And by the time I start getting used to it, I've burnt my legs out. Then its just bad lazy skiing for the rest of the day. 

What's your height and weight? 

5'7", 148 lbs

 

What I'm thinking is an all mountain ski. Buying two pairs of skis seems like overkill as far as money is concerned, and I don't want to have to rent every time it snows. I definitely want to be good in the grainy icy kind of snow I usually end up seeing. I want to learn to handle bumps better. What I feel I need though, is an easier time in powdery conditions, for whenever it snows, or whenever I travel. 

 

I know the Bonafides seem to be the go-to all mountain ski this year, but they're also a little hard to get/expensive. I figured I'd ask for some suggestions first. I'm also a little unsure about size. I usually ski around 168-174 cm, but I know that could change depending on the ski. 

 

Anyway, any wisdom you guys may have for me is really appreciated. 

post #2 of 12

Welcome to EpicSki!  Have you ever rented demo skis?  Preferably on the mountain so that it's possible to switch out easily and check out several contenders on the same day.  It's pretty hard to decide what is a good ski for you based on what works for others.  Too many variables.  As you've probably noticed, there are a LOT of choices.

 

How well do rental boots fit you?

post #3 of 12

The Bonafide may be a bit too demanding and wide for your anticipated use.  You may want to look at slightly softer, narrower skis.  The Bone's little brother, the Bushwacker would be good to demo, as would dozens of other skis: Experience 88, Watea 84, Magnum 8.5, Outland 87...  Others with more knowledge can likely provide a better list.

 

Assuming you're male, you're smaller and lighter than the average skier.  You won't need skis as long or as wide as average folks in order to get the same sensations.  You'll likely get those sensations at one notch down in both dimensions.  Be careful whose advice you take.

post #4 of 12

Welcome to EpicSki.  First things first.  You say you've been renting for 5 years, but have you been renting skis and boots or just skis.  If you've been renting boots also, that is where you need to start.  Boots are far more important than skis, and they need to fit correctly and that is pretty much impossible for a first timer to do by themselves.  I can think of some skis that might be good for you but I will reserve that until you tell us about boots.  But, I agree with Xela about the Bones, they are not for intermediates

post #5 of 12
Heino's is one of the better ski shops in North Jersey...go there for boots and fitting.

across the street practically is Ski Barn. their booting fitting is a joke, despite being a certified ABB shop

www.bootfitters.com

the best bootfitter in the area is Jeff Rich, US Orthotic Center in Manhattan. one of the ABB founders and master instructors. he doesnt sell boots, he's a boot fitter and makes orthotics if needed. he made orthotics for my snowboard boots. not cheap though.
post #6 of 12

Whatever you do, do yourself a favor and never go into Ski Barn looking for any help from them. If you need a hardgood and know they have it that's a different story. People come into the rental shop at our hill all the time with equipment set improperly from them.

 

If you have a ballpark guess of what flex boots you were renting that will dramatically narrow your search. 

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post

Whatever you do, do yourself a favor and never go into Ski Barn looking for any help from them. If you need a hardgood and know they have it that's a different story. People come into the rental shop at our hill all the time with equipment set improperly from them.

 

If you have a ballpark guess of what flex boots you were renting that will dramatically narrow your search. 

which hill is that?

One of my coworkers is a UVM graduate... a Mech Engineer... and loved the skiing there.

post #8 of 12

I second the notion of buying boots before skis if you have not already done so.  It would be somewhat counter-productive for me to recommend specific skis to you as I have not skied many models in the width you are likely looking for (I would assume somewhere in the mid to high 80's from what you described in your original post), but I will say that you should definitely look into last years model.  If you are worried about cost this will allow you to get what is likely the same ski with a different top sheet for a lower price than the current model year version, or perhaps a slightly nicer ski   than you otherwise would have been able to purchase given your budget.  As we approach the end of the season shops will start having large sales in an attempt to dump last this years inventory so that they can restock for next season.  This means that now is a great time for you to start looking for skis if you intend to purchase last years model.  I would keep an eye on backcountry.com and evogear.com (especially the "outlet" on each site), as well as anything that your local shops are trying to dump for some great deals in the coming months.  There are also several ski retailers right here on Epic who may be able to hook you up with a good deal too.  Basically, I wouldn't be in a hurry to buy right this minute as you will have all summer to scour some of the best deals of the season.  Just be warned that popular sizes will clear out quickly.

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ah, sorry, I definitely should have mentioned, I actually do own a pair of boots already. Rental boots are the worst. 

After trying on basically everything they sell at pelican, I found these rossi's to fit the most comfortably in the range of boots the guy there recommended to me: http://www.rossignol.com/US/US/experience-sensor-110_RB13090_product_alpine-men-boots-all-mountain-allsnow.html

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanscrazydaisy View Post

which hill is that?

One of my coworkers is a UVM graduate... a Mech Engineer... and loved the skiing there.

Campgaw in Mahwah, NJ, if you're familiar with it you know why I called it a hill haha. And the skiing is great up there, the ski club offers insane discounts on season passes, I paid $375 for one to Stowe.

 

\\thread jack

 

Nice boots! What kind of skis have you been renting? To give us an idea of what you're used to, what edge grip you may be sacrificing by going to a wider all mountain ski.

post #11 of 12
I have a friend that grew up in Mahwah

while on a business trip this week, prior to the thread, me and a Mountain Creek ski patroller had the same exact discussion with another co-worker emphasizing boots and getting fitted.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by cytokinesis View Post
 Fresh powdery snow is fun, but hard to ski in. I was hoping slightly wider skis would help here. 

 

Answer from my experience is yes, yes it will.  But if 90% of your time is on groomers, really you should just buy to primarily suit that.  magnum 8.5 or 8.0 are frontside ski or all the other skis in that category.  

Even if you did pay the around $1000 to track down a bonafide, despite being flipcore, it is still somewhat traditional.  Getting a freeride or really-rockered ski which allows you to pivot and wiggle the ski around in soft stuff is what will make your powder day fun.  Once you get the hang of that, you can decide to try the same on your all-mountain skis, 

 

On the next powderday skip over the all-mountainness and try a fully rockered ski "freeride" ski.  The most commonly found and well known is the rossignol s3 but you can ask for anything similar.   I am 150 and 5'7 and take out the s3 in 168 for the soft stuff.  It skis very short,  about the same as a 158-ish frontside ski.  The chart says I could go to 178, but the shorter size is really manueverable.

 

It will not work as well at very higher speeds for you on the groomers or ice, but will feel stable and very in control at slower speeds and .  

In the deeper soft stuff, it will not hook, grab, or dive randomly away from you.  I am not an expert in powder, but i If you aren't doing well in powder on this type of ski, it's time for some tips or a lesson.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › After five years of renting skis, I think its about time to commit. Help me choose?