New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Need a bit of a tip

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I was a beginner and started skiing, and I have posted some vids to get some feedback few weeks ago, anyhow fast forward to now I finaly got some money so I got some private instructions, I have to say it was worth every cent..

I will probably post a vid in 1-3 weeks or so, for now I don't have someone who can vid me, but its coming soon !

Anyway the lessons really helped alot, now im actually skiing ! What I was doing before was more fighting the snow and skiding than actual skiing, but now I finaly can say that im actually skiing using the edges of the skies, so it feels awesome.. can't wait to hear analysis when I do post my vid and tips on what to improve next.

The reason why im opening this topic already without a vid tho is because im going to practice till then, my biggest mistake so far is leaning too far back, now we did try to correct it a bit with the instructor but its not good still hence why I want to improve it.

Now when I use some excercises like skiing without poles and having my arms on my knees I do it fairly well, but when I start using my poles I just naturaly lean too far back even when I try not too, how should I try to correct this when im using my poles? Should I just keep excercising with the arms on knees thingie and I guess let the body remember the position and somehow transition to that when using poles or are there some other excersises I could do aswell that would help?

post #2 of 16
Did your instructor introduce your shins to the cuffs of your boots? Did you learn to stand so that you're always in contact with the boot cuffs?

When you put your hands on your knees, do you feel the fronts of the boots? Most folks who reach for their knees stick out their backside, so when they stand up, they stand on their heels and feel the backs of the boot cuffs.

You want to stand up and flex your ankles and knees slightly so you pelvis moves over the arches of your feet.

Keeping your hands slightly in front of your pelvis with the poles pointed back helps maintain shin contact with the cuffs.
post #3 of 16

Love,

 

What Kneale said... 

 

Still skiing in a wedge? If so try making it smaller and rocking a little form side to side that you lightly step from one foot to the other foot (ski gets no more than 2 inches off the snow). Try skiing with your elbows holding your poles horizontally against your stomach and your elbows at 90 degree angles. Try skiing with your hands held behind your back.

 

If not, try shuffling your feet and forth as quick as you can while skiing. (and do the poles and hands behind the back suggestion above).

 

My bet is that you are flexing your ankles when you hold your knees and not flexing when you are holding your poles. When you hold your poles, start by holding them so that your hands are touching your thighs. Imagine you have little bungie cords attached to belt loops at your waist. As you move your hands forward about 6 inches, feel the bungies pull your hips about 2 inches forward. You should feel the same ankle flex as when you hold your knees.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

Kneale thats exactly whats happening most of the times my shins tend to lose contact with the cuffs at times and then my center of balance is too back and I can feel it, but even tho I was trying to correct it, it wasn't so easy cuz the shins just lose contact at times.

When my hands are on my knees I can feel shins on the cuffs very well, but when skiing with poles not so much, and often the shins slip even more backwards and they lose all contact.

post #5 of 16
Not an instructor just another intermidiot so take it for what it's worth.

At end of each turn/beginning of a new turn, try consciously pull your feet back under you. However like many things skiing, shin pushing against boots is a result of keeping your center of mass forward. As such it shouldn't be your primary focus, or you'll end up doing things that move your shin forward but sitting back and result in CoM even further back. Instead focus on keeping your weight on ball of your foot, move body and hands forward while stopped and remember what it feels like, and try to replicate that feeling while you are moving.
post #6 of 16

If everything is hunky dory without poles, and not with poles, then stop using poles! For now.

There's no requirement to use poles. Snowboarders don't even have them, they don't even have skis. (hmmm...what's wrong with them?)

 

Poles will not help you stop when skiing. Perhaps you view them as something to help you stop? That's quite common actually though often it's unconscious.

or....

       Things aren't so hunky dory without poles.

                                                                            > Then see all of the above posts.
 

post #7 of 16

Good advice already (shins, feet pulling). You could also try to put your arms forward, which helps keeping you centered. Don't let them hanging beside your body. Exercise: get the poles together and grab your poles horizontally and in front of you. You have to keep your hands always within your field of vision (hope I explained it well this way).

 

ns1y.png&size=400x1000

Poles are really important for your balance, you could lose them for some exercises, but I wouldn't recommend skiing without them at all.

post #8 of 16

Dragging or even almost but not quite touching the pole basket  of the outside (left side when making a right turn) ski pole to a point on the snow about even with your ski tip on the outside of the turn seems to  helping a little bit.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveSkiing View Post

Kneale thats exactly whats happening most of the times my shins tend to lose contact with the cuffs at times and then my center of balance is too back and I can feel it, but even tho I was trying to correct it, it wasn't so easy cuz the shins just lose contact at times.
When my hands are on my knees I can feel shins on the cuffs very well, but when skiing with poles not so much, and often the shins slip even more backwards and they lose all contact.

You are able to maintain shin contact with the cuffs when putting your hands on your knees because your upper body weight is keeping you forward. You need to develop a feel for standing more upright, but touching the cuffs with the shins by FLEXING THE ANKLES. When you turn you need to employ the ski edges by rolling the feet toward the turn direction, not by pushing down into the snow with the feet. When you push down on the foot, you open the ankle joint and lose contact with the boot cuff.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post


FLEXING THE ANKLES.
When you turn you need to employ the ski edges by rolling the feet toward the turn direction, not by pushing down into the snow with the feet. When you push down on the foot, you open the ankle joint and lose contact with the boot cuff.

 

This^^^^

 

I like to call it letting off the gas, as in the movement you would make to let off the gas pedal in a car. The way you "pull your feet back under you", "move your COM over your" is to dorsiflex the ankle. Pushing down on the "gas pedal" causes your shins to lose contact with the cuff/tongue of the boot and moves your COM back.

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

Some good tips im gonna try this next time, sadly I wanted to try this week but im sick, so probably this weekend or monday im hoping, then il update this thread on my progress.
 

post #12 of 16
ILS - hopefully this is not too late to be useful this year. Firstly, I would imagine that this is rehashing some pretty old advice, but it might help to visualize it in a different way. I'm not a certified instructor, but I am a registered mechanical engineer, so I am certified to discuss trigonometry. So here goes: if you take a paperback in good condition (no dog ears), grab each bottom corner with a thumb & forefinger, and lower it onto a tabletop, you can then imagine that the table is flat ground and the spine of the book (the left edge with the title on it) is you standing upright on your skis (like Karly drew). Holding that left edge against the table, tilt the book to the left by raising the right corner off the table (by an inch or so). The spine tilts left and is no longer perpendicular to the table. That's you, still standing upright (centered) on your skis and going down a hill with a slope equal to the angle of the book bottom to the table. Now if you tilt the book even more, that tilted spine is still you centered on your skis skiing down a steeper hill. No big deal so far (trigonomically speaking). However, you feel like you are leaning way forward, even though you are still centered on your skis. The trick is getting used to that feeling before you encounter it on a slope. Better yet, as a number of posters have alluded to, you need to get used to the feeling of your feet "tucked back under you" when you are in that position. So try this next: stand with your toes about 3 " in front of the kitchen sink. Lock your knees and allow yourself to fall forward toward the sink while keeping your heels on the floor. When your body contacts the counter you will be in a centered-on-your-skis-going-down-a-20-degree-slope position (not a particularly steep slope). Now allow your knees to bend forward a bit. You now have a pretty close approximation what it feels like with your feet tucked back while your shins are contacting the tongues of your boots. Do that a couple of times a day from, say May till November, and you should have some muscle memory built up. The other part of this is getting over the unsettling feeling that you will "go over the handlebars" in a face plant if you are leaning "way forward" down a steep slope. If, on flat ground, you try to get the tails of your skis to come off the ground by leaning forward from your ankles, it is virtually impossible. Loosen your boot buckles a bit to allow additional forward lean and give it a try. I loosened my boots enough so I was leaning out like a ski jumper and barely unweighted my tails. It demonstrates that you don't have to worry about staying forward into your boots, no matter how steep the slope. And the steeper the slope, the more forward leaning you need to feel to get the skis to turn. Hope this helps.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Ok heres an update

 

I went skiing yesterday and used some tips from here, like flexing my ankles and I have to say it improved things quite alot, im able to maintain shin contact most of the time now which is great, and I also feel better with my feet controling my skis etc..

I was a bit too far back with my upper body tho at first, but then I kinda visualized in my head that im trying to grab my knees ( alltho I had my poles, but I just imagined it in my head how im trying to grab my knees with my imaginary hands ) and it worked and it was much better.

So overall I have to say I have improved quite alot, its probably not perfect posture yet, il need to get that feedback from the vids I post in a week or two, but its much better than before.

However I have been having one issue and I hope its enough for you guys to realize what might be causing it from the description alone.. the thing is that my upper hill ski is kinda not really in contact with the snow, its not really carving through the snow, the front of the ski even kinda jumps up and down and it just feels weird.

It never happens when I make right turns tho, when making right turns both of my skis, the downwards main one and the upper one both carve through the snow smothly, but when making left turns my upper ski doesnt really want to do it and the front of the ski kinda jumps up and down.. so I don't know, what could be causing this and what could I try to do to fix it?
 

post #14 of 16

You've mentioned losing shin contact and a squirrely ski  - both of these symptoms make me wonder if your boots are sized properly? Your boot should be snug like a handshake. If you can lift your heel, or rotate your foot inside of the boot laterally or side to side, or take your shin off the front of the boot when it's done up, the boot is too big. First I'd get your bootfit assessed as a sloppy boot will contribute to these issues. 

 

From a technique perspective, there are too many things I'm having to imagine based on your description to come up with good, specific, suggestions. Can you post some video? Alternately, can you clarify: Is it the inside ski, or the outside ski that's going squirrely? At what point of the turn does it go squirrely on you? How fast are you skiing?

 

My suspicion is boot-related though for now.

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

You've mentioned losing shin contact and a squirrely ski  - both of these symptoms make me wonder if your boots are sized properly? Your boot should be snug like a handshake. If you can lift your heel, or rotate your foot inside of the boot laterally or side to side, or take your shin off the front of the boot when it's done up, the boot is too big. First I'd get your bootfit assessed as a sloppy boot will contribute to these issues. 

 

From a technique perspective, there are too many things I'm having to imagine based on your description to come up with good, specific, suggestions. Can you post some video? Alternately, can you clarify: Is it the inside ski, or the outside ski that's going squirrely? At what point of the turn does it go squirrely on you? How fast are you skiing?

 

My suspicion is boot-related though for now.

 

Alright

First of all boot size, from the size perspective they are good, my toes touch the front firmly unless I bend my knees, perrhaps they could be too big in other ways? Like too much space around based on my foot? idk, maybe I could also try to close the clips harder next time and see if that makes it better.

About the video, I will make a MA vid in 1-2 weeks because I don't have any people that can videotape me before that... maybe I could try to video my skis and exactly how it looks, but I dont know if that would be much of a help to determine the problem of it.

When I turn right it seems to not be an issue but when I turn left it seems to be, so when I turn left my left leg ski is the one doing it, so my uphill ( inside? ) ski.
I think it starts to happen once I start getting in the turn position, once my edge is engaged, the downhill one is but the uphill one is not or perhaps too little. Speed is around 15-30mph.

 

Here I made a pic

 

 

On the right when I turn right both edges are engaged and it goes smooth and comfortable, but on the left when I turn left my uphill ski seems to not be engaged properly and the front of it flaps up and down or so.

post #16 of 16

You are traveling at speed, which is going to make it very difficult to analyze what's happening.  The problem will still be with you if you slow down on beginner terrain, where you'll have time to analyze what's going on.  So go to the bunny slope and do some turns at a snail's pace.  Look at and feel very closely what's happening with your turns to see if your left turns behave differently from your right turns.  The slower you go, the more evident any differences will be.  You can do this analysis yourself.  Here are the things to check.  Look at the good turns to the right, then see how the gimpy turns to the left are different.

 

1.  parallel skis  - do they stay parallel through the entire turn, or do tips diverge or converge at some point in the turn?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

2.  tip lead - do your tips stay even with each other, or do you generate tip lead as the turn progresses?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

3.  weight - do you feel your weight on the inside ski (right ski on right turns, left ski on left turns), the outside ski, or both, through the turn?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

4.  do you feel your shins pressing into the front of your boot cuffs, or the back of your boot cuffs?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

5.  jacket zipper - does it face in the direction of the turn, staying right between both skis, or does it shift and face somewhat down the hill?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

6.  hands - does the inside hand (right hand on right turns) move back towards your hip as the turn progresses (that's not good)?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

7.  inside shoulder (left shoulder for left turns) - does the inside shoulder move ahead of the outside shoulder during your turns (that's good)?  ---Is it the same for turns to the right and to the left?

8.  look back at your tracks.  Compare left turns to right turns.  Are they the same or not?

9.  starting turns (initiation) - is it harder to start a turn to the left than to the right?  Or the same?

 

 

If you do not detect any differences in these factors at slow speeds on beginner terrain, then it might not be body movements but instead it could be boot issues.  If you do, then you can work on making the left turns match the right turns.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching