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Suggestions for Expanding East Coast Quiver

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Right now operating with a quiver of one, Blizzard Magnum 8.1s. 60% of the time I couldn't be happier with this. But 20% of the time, though, it's brutal hardpack and ice, the woods are barren and I wish I had something a bit narrower and more dedicated to that. Another 20% of the time, it's deep as hell and I wish I had something wider and softer for that too, which would also be more functional out West for those rare occasions and in the spring corn/soft snow.

Figure for a powder/soft nsow ski, something around 100mm under foot that's a little softer (still live in New England after all, super fat ultra soft ski would be mostly wasted here). Bonafides or Kabookies? Mantras? Ross Experience 98? Open to all suggestions!

For an ice carver...something around 70mm. Honestly have no skis in mind, I don't see much coverage of skis under 80mm these days!

 

Gracias!

post #2 of 20
Thread Starter 

Fischer Watea 101 another soft snow one I am thinking of

post #3 of 20

I can recommend a couple of skis to try.  One is an Elan SL Waveflex Fusion, 66mm waist.  I skied this at Snowbasin a couple of weeks ago on mostly hardpack and they were really fun.  Very precise and very stable on the hardpack I encountered.  Years ago I remember people saying that Fischer made great skis for ice, don't know much about Fischer skis nor do I know is that statement is still true or even if it was ever true.  The other ski is the Atomic Ritual, 103mm waist, camber, rockered tip and tail.  This is on my buy list for next season as my new deep snow ski.  It was great in the trees and in the powder I found at Big Sky the day I tried them.

post #4 of 20

Check out the Elan Amphibio line.

post #5 of 20

I test perhaps 20-25 of the narrower waisted skis every year. Aside from race skis, the standouts for 2013 were the Head Magnum and the Dynastar Course Ti. Both are grippy and damp with the Head a little more on the damp side and the Dynastar a little more on the energetic side. Outside of raceland, it really doesn't get much better than those two.

 

Among wider skis, the Mantra and Ex 98 are not especially great in soft b/c both are pretty stiff. Either of those might make sense as an eastern OSQ but given that you'll have two skis that are better on the harder stuff, it probably doesn't make a lot of sense to prioritize that too highly for your wider ski. The Bonafide and Kabookie along with the Nordica Enforcer and Hell and Back are incrementally softer and somewhat better in softer snow, but may be rather hard to find. Nothing wrong with looking a little wider still into such as the aforementioned Atomic Ritual, Head Rev 105, or the somewhat scarce Dynastar Cham 107 (high mtn version) None of those has the harder snow performance of the Bonafide, Enforcer etc. but all are notably better in softer snow.

 

SJ

post #6 of 20

Peopel will say I'm crazy, but I could be pretty happy with (insert frontside ski of choice) and a pair of Nordica Patrons. I've skied the last 4 days on teh Patron here in Stowe, and we have had no appreciable snowfall.

 

I could prune my quiver down to the Kastle MX83 and the Patron and not be missing much. Adding a Kastle RX would be nice too.

post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks everybody for the responses thus far. Definitely helpful.

Jim, thanks especially for the detailed response. Finding a ski in the 98ish-105ish territory that is softer has been somewhat of a challenge -- because this basically is the range of "one ski quiver" skis for Westerners, they are often rather stiff. I've heard that the Bonafide is also pretty stiff -- but the Kabookie (same ski sans metal) is quite a bit softer. The Head Rev 105 looks like a very good option -- Philplug's review quoted on the Start Haus site looks like exactly what I am looking for so I will definitely be checking that one out more. I couldn't anything on the tail though -- is a twin tipped ski? I
 

post #8 of 20

A buddy skis his Mantra's every day at Okemo, 98mm.

 

The new wider skis are great for the snow we get here. I ski my Kendos every day too. We have fat skis for the few powder days we get mine Got's are 106mm. His wife skis her Tuff Lov's as a every day ski and has fat lov's.

 

They are looking at getting her something in low 90's waist.

 

Be careful about getting a wide ski with no metal in it. It will get pushed around in the heavy crud. His K2 Chiefs can't keep up with my Got's.

post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

Be careful about getting a wide ski with no metal in it. It will get pushed around in the heavy crud. His K2 Chiefs can't keep up with my Got's.

Uh, as I read the syntax here, he can't keep up with your Goats because they have metal. But they don't, y'know. And anyway, some of the beefiest wide skis made don't either: ON3P Wrenegades, Moment Governor's or Belafonte's, Rossi Squad 7's, Kastle BMX 128's, PM Bros 192's, DPS Lotus 120's Flex 3, Praxis GPO or their Kodiak for H20, and so on...

 

As I understand it, the flex is primarily determined by cross sectional area underfoot, and the materials in that cross section. Typically, stiffness is provided by the density of wood and the amount of glass. Classically, as with your Goats, a torsion box can add some stiffness without much weight penalty. Carbon or metal allow a thinner cross sectional area at the same flex, but change the feel; metal gives a slower resonating dampness, carbon gives a faster resonating liveliness. 

post #10 of 20

Thanks for catching that.

 

If I was in the market now, Katana's would be high on my list.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by timm View Post

Thanks everybody for the responses thus far. Definitely helpful.

Jim, thanks especially for the detailed response. Finding a ski in the 98ish-105ish territory that is softer has been somewhat of a challenge -- because this basically is the range of "one ski quiver" skis for Westerners, they are often rather stiff. I've heard that the Bonafide is also pretty stiff -- but the Kabookie (same ski sans metal) is quite a bit softer. The Head Rev 105 looks like a very good option -- Philplug's review quoted on the Start Haus site looks like exactly what I am looking for so I will definitely be checking that one out more. I couldn't anything on the tail though -- is a twin tipped ski? I
 

 

Lumping the 98-105 together can be misleading as many ski makers will build the 10X models with more of a soft snow bias while they'll keep the 98's a little stiffer and more in the OSQ arena. Re: the Bonafide vs. Kabookie......the KB is not quite a bit softer than the Bone. They are actually pretty similar in flex and really don't ski too differently. Also, metal vs. non is mostly irrelevant these days because some makers can build such great skis without metal that it should not be your primary focus. The Head Rev 105 is a medium flex ski with a flat tail. The Atomic Ritual is also a medium but is marginally stiffer than the Head. The Ritual has a notable kicktail and the marketing dept thinks that it has some tail rocker.

 

SJ

post #12 of 20
Jim, any thoughts on the Rossi S3 vs the Head for powder/spring corn? The Head is tempting me I have to admit but still a little wary of the width, just because I've not skied anything above 95 here in the East.

Thanks again.
post #13 of 20

The Rossi feels very short. Much like you are skiing the ski right under foot but not much out at the extremeties. OTH, the Head feels very conventional and "full length". That's definitely a "feel" difference and not a definitive make/break one way or the other. The Head is much bigger in the forebody and thus has more lift in deep snow than anything else in it's width category. The Rossi feels nimble/quick for sure but just a little short or jibby which is not a fave feel for me.

 

Honestly the Dynastar Cham 97 high mountain is a much more versatile and stable ski in the light/quick genre than the S3 is. OTH.....the Cham 97 HM might be a little hard to find at this point.

 

SJ
 

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Check out the Elan Amphibio line.

Don't know about all the line but can say that the 88xti is a real all-mountain carver ! But to some little sacrifices... A little stiff for bumps and more carvy than edgy for trees

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Peopel will say I'm crazy, but I could be pretty happy with (insert frontside ski of choice) and a pair of Nordica Patrons. I've skied the last 4 days on teh Patron here in Stowe, and we have had no appreciable snowfall.

 

I could prune my quiver down to the Kastle MX83 and the Patron and not be missing much. Adding a Kastle RX would be nice too.

The rx12 can be so veratile for a carver of that level! Also good in crud and doeable in bumps and skied trees! The 168 is fun anywhere but the 178 demand more work in bumps ( and didn't skied them in trees).

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

Lumping the 98-105 together can be misleading as many ski makers will build the 10X models with more of a soft snow bias while they'll keep the 98's a little stiffer and more in the OSQ arena. Re: the Bonafide vs. Kabookie......the KB is not quite a bit softer than the Bone. They are actually pretty similar in flex and really don't ski too differently. Also, metal vs. non is mostly irrelevant these days because some makers can build such great skis without metal that it should not be your primary focus. The Head Rev 105 is a medium flex ski with a flat tail. The Atomic Ritual is also a medium but is marginally stiffer than the Head. The Ritual has a notable kicktail and the marketing dept thinks that it has some tail rocker.

 

SJ

So wright! I'm selling wright now my Nordica Steadfast because  I found them too stiff for an all-mountain! They're stiffer than the mx88 or 78; they're even a little stiffer than the 88xti! And they are all wood!

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post

I'm selling right now my Nordica Steadfast because  I found them too stiff for an all-mountain! They're stiffer than the mx88

 

This just proves that not everyone has the same opinion of any particular ski.  I'm 5'7-8", 150 pounds and the Steadfast is my daily driver.  I ski them in the trees, in the bumps, in powder up to about 24" and on the groomers and don't think they're overly stiff at all.th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #16 of 20

Yeah I know! I read your review before buying it... It's not a bad ski but prefer something smoother for trees... You have a 170 and I have a 177. I've found that I can ski short stiff ski ( 168-172 cm) almost anywhere but I'm having trouble with longer ones (176 to 182).I gess I'm not that good!smile.gif

post #17 of 20

I'd guess it's about your length. If you're average height, lot easier to pressure the tips of a 168-172. 

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I'd guess it's about your length. If you're average height, lot easier to pressure the tips of a 168-172. 

6 feet; 210 pounds...

post #19 of 20

Finally, I think that I'll keep my Steadfast... They are stiff but it comes with disadvantages ( ski planting in the bump and me flying over) but also advantages ( very light and quick and you can ski it very aggressively in...everywhere! Specially love them in Jay's glades when it didn't snowed for couple of days...

post #20 of 20

 If you find Blizzard Magnum 8.1s. not suitable for boilerplate,or  marble conditions save yourself some$$$. Ski a few runs and  go have yourself a great brunch, matinee? Do something else and have a great day. There is always tomorrow.

 

Last year in VT I had a blast in the trees. A wide tree ski is what you should search for, I was lucky and caught a lot of powder days  in my 35 days last year.

 

Possibly look for a previous year or used ski. Ulllr can be fickle. 

 

Good luck

 

CJ

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