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Where does the cost to benefit ratio start to plateau when buying new skis?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Obviously everybody has their own needs when it comes to ski selection, but is there a certain price point where paying more doesn't necessarily mean that much more quality/performance?

 

 

I took the advice of splurging more on boots and am now looking for skis.

 

Any advice is greatly appreciated!

post #2 of 14
Thread Starter 

Also, is there harm in looking at skis from the past few years? Any amazing new developments that make the 2013 year models light years beyond 2010-2012 models?

post #3 of 14

No and no.
 

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by FortWorthAggie View Post

But is there a certain price point where paying more doesn't necessarily mean that much more quality/performance?

 

 

See, the issue here is that you could ask every single member of this site what the best performing ski is and get almost as many answers. While there are certainly some skis that are very popular, everybody's tastes are different.

 

So, there really isn't an answer to your question as there really isn't a consistent answer as to what a good performing ski feels like.

 

In general, skis for the beginner and intermediate market will be more flexible and lighter, which makes them playful and easy to turn, but less stable at speed. More advanced skis tend to be stiffer, but this is far from universal, and most of the time the stiffest ski in a category is not the favorite ski in the category.

 

If possible, the best thing to do would be to hit a demo day, ski a bunch of skis, and hopefully get a feel for what attributes you like, if not straight up find your ski.

 

Failing that, assuming you are a beginner/intermediate skier, I would buy a cheap pair of intermediate level skis and put some days on them developing as a skier. Your tastes in ski will almost certainly change as you get better, and if you take advantage of some demo days hopefully by the time you are ready to buy your next pair you will have a better idea of what direction to go.

post #5 of 14

If you are looking to save money.  Shop now and for the next 2 months for end of season deals.  They are out there, though sometimes finding the right size and model can be work.

 

I almost always buy this time of year. I can have the latest and greatest one year behind the curve as everyone is talking about next year's skis already. It's also easier to find reviews since people have been on the skis for a while.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by FortWorthAggie View Post

Obviously everybody has their own needs when it comes to ski selection, but is there a certain price point where paying more doesn't necessarily mean that much more quality/performance?

 

 

I took the advice of splurging more on boots and am now looking for skis.

 

Any advice is greatly appreciated!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FortWorthAggie View Post

Also, is there harm in looking at skis from the past few years? Any amazing new developments that make the 2013 year models light years beyond 2010-2012 models?


Well. after boots, spend money on good ski clothes and accessories (gloves, goggles, hat, socks) you dont need to be an expert to appreciate warm, dry and comfortable.  After that, spend money on lift tickets and lessons...after that skis.  You can easily buy a used pair of last years "must have ski" for under $150.  Will they be as good as they were new?  No.  Skis wear out...but dont worry about it....it will be a bit before you notice the difference anyway.

post #7 of 14

also if you wish to save money you may want to look into buying demos...

 

here in quebec shops and manufacturers organize demo day where you can borrow skis for 2-3 runs. At the end of the season they usually try to sell those skis so they may have 10-15 days on then (and not full days either) and comme at bargain price.

 

I guess people tend to not be too gentle with them but from what i have seen it's mostly cosmetic damage to the top sheet...  but do inspect base and edges to make sure.

 

as for the cost benefit i'm not sure there is a definite answer... i basically set myself a 500$ budget, went on to try a lot of skis and made a list of those i liked and hunted for end-of-season bargains.

 

That maybe a bit late for that so the other solutions would be to read lots of ski reviews and make a list of potential ski and go hunt for bargains...

 

but in the end i believe there really is no bad skis... some better to you than others but they all let you go down the slope with a smile!

post #8 of 14

end of season and mid summer sales are your best bet. demo on the slopes, shop online.  there is no true reason to ever not buy cool new ski equipment.

post #9 of 14

In summary: waaaaaaaay too many variables (finances, skills, objectives, psychological quirks/hang-ups, etc.). One person's plateau is someone else's unscaleable cliff.  I just spent more money for skis (that I then proceeded to rip the integral bindings off of, to install my own choice) than probably 99% of the forum members would consider fiscally wise, and yet it was absolutely the right move for me.  It's a gamble: only throw down the amount of money that YOU can afford to lose, because you may just discover that, in spite of all the legwork and advise, you chose poorly.

post #10 of 14

Buy it cheap buy it twice, words to live by
 

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevez33 View Post

Buy it cheap buy it twice, words to live by
 

Does keep the economy going

post #12 of 14

To answer the original question --when your wife starts giving you the stink eye.  But seriously, most makers' skis in a particularly niche are priced pretty much the same, with the exception of of some higher priced skis like Kastle and DPS. So one brand of 105mm cambered, tip rockered all mountain ski will price similarly to other brands, likewise the 68mm non-race carver, likewise their twin tip park ski, etc.  Even an ultra popular ski like the Blizzard Bonafide is priced competitively--the only difference being that it sells out before skis go on sale. If you go for a cheaper model you're probably going to wind up with a softer ski that isn't going to work for you if you're an advanced skier. Now are the expensive brands worth the extra money--their owners would say yes, but most people will be able to find a ski in the regular price range that will work just fine. The best way to save money on skis is buy on sale late season (but a lot of popular skis in popular sizes sell out before that) or to buy used, unless you ski often and hard enough to wear out skis, in which case used might be false economy.

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgrezmer View Post

No and no.
 


Quoted for truth.

post #14 of 14

Definitely demo.  Find a few that you like and then watch the summer sales.  Unless you already have a quiver, you are probably not going to be looking for the "one and only" perfect ski to fill a need.  There are a lot of really great skis out there in every category.  Those who already own multiple pairs sometimes need the one specific ski to fill a specific need.  Otherwise, you have many choices.  The main thing is to find a ski YOU like.  As everybody said above, it's more personal than it seems.

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