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Moguls... the skiier's last frontier

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I'm not much of a park person... but... I would love to get "survivable" at moguls....

 

Would a shorter board (I ride a 154 Burton T6)...with more flex help me?

 

I was thinking about adding a 152 Lib Tech Skate Banana....

post #2 of 11

Tanscrazydaisy,

 

It depends on what your issues are. 2cm won't make much difference length wise. More flex could help if you are already making movements that flex the board and lack of board flex is limiting your performance or your rate of skill improvement. But almost everyone could ride better with a softer board. Personally, I ride a board that I've been told is so "too stiff" that "I can't bend it" so you have to take my advice with a grain of skepticism when I say that there are very few riders who would not benefit overall by switching to a softer board. I'm not eating my own dog food here.

 

It's more likely that you are suffering from the symptoms of the myth that snowboarders can't ride in the moguls. If you don't have the right combination of skills, tactics and the ability to read "lines" in a mogul field, survivability is certainly going to be questionable no matter what kind of board you have. Sometimes there are fundamental issues (e.g. not arching for toes sides. back foot pivoting) that need to be addressed on the groomers before we are even ready to talk survivability. For now, 'll assume that a too stiff board is not a fundamental issue for you.

 

I just did a short intro to moguls for boarding session yesterday. We started with combining "reading a line" with tactics. The easiest way to get through a mogul field is to find a flat traverse. On our mogul run, there are flat spots along either side. We side slipped down about 10 feet until we could see a "flat alley" that angled across the run. Staying in the alley just requires mini "garland" type turns. It was cool because the alley we spotted ended in a trouble spot about a 1/3 of the way in. Going uphill around the trouble spot took you into a big hole. Following the rut around the trouble spot would give you too much speed. It was the perfect example of seeing a "set" of 3 bumps ahead that's easy to ride so that you have plenty of time to plan for how to deal with trouble at the end of the set. In this case, crossing the rut to get onto the back side of the big blocking mogul and then side slipping down the back side allowed you shift down into another flat alley to complete the traverse across the run. Having this combination of skills, tactics and reading ability gives a rider the capability to survive a run when the difficulty is "over the their head" for riding straight down the run. Adjustments to this approach to either ride the flat alley faster or to ride the bumpier edges of the flat alley allow one to gradually increase the level of difficulty so they can develop the skills to start taking a more traditional down the fall line line.

 

After survivability, we can start talking about specific theory (e.g. the role of absorption in speed control) and tactics (e.g. how to ride a flat board laterally across a mogul), but most people just need to get more experience before they need to worry about more "how to" stuff.

post #3 of 11

Personally, I'd suggest skis.

ski.gif

post #4 of 11

I don't think I could survive REALLY nasty bumps with my feet tied to a single plank, but I have seen it done and done quite well by a few others.  Kudos to those that take the time and put forth the effort to get good at moguls in a snowboard!

post #5 of 11

I'd love to see some video of snowboarders skiing moguls well. Post if you know of any.

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
TheRusty

my current board is a 156 (brain fart from earlier)

smaller moguls I'm fine with, as I can usually pick a good path

the huge moguls, that are hard to what's behind, is what's very painful
post #7 of 11
Quote:
 
I'd love to see some video of snowboarders skiing moguls well. Post if you know of any.

 

 

 

 

Here's some basic info on how to get started.  I've seen a couple people do better, faster, but not as fast as a good skier..

 

post #8 of 11

Ay yi yi - ptui - pivot turns! I like the snow professor videos (and 1/2 of this one), but I'm not a fan of this approach to mogul teaching. I can't complain too much though because I have no video. This link has more relevant for high end mogul riding. This link shows a good example of why pivot turns are limiting in larger bumps.

 

I've seen some great mogul riding (no great video handy), but there is a reason there are no riders competing in pro mogul events.

CASI has some good mogul sequences in this clip:

 

 

See 54 seconds, and 1:34.

 

 

Tans,

 

Ok 4cm is going to be twice as "not much difference". To be fair, the libtech is a rockered board. It will ride shorter than it's length compared to the T6. And it is bound to be softer than the T6.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
my old 156 Forum Seeker.... now that's a stiff board
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

Ay yi yi - ptui - pivot turns! I like the snow professor videos (and 1/2 of this one), but I'm not a fan of this approach to mogul teaching. I can't complain too much though because I have no video. This link has more relevant for high end mogul riding. This link shows a good example of why pivot turns are limiting in larger bumps.

 

I'd think having all your weight on the front foot could prove disastrous and send peeps over the bars going fast in big nasty bumps.  I noticed that happened in a later part of the video.  Looks like one of the many tools someone would need from time to time though..

post #11 of 11

I was amazed to see nose rolls work in steep nasty bumps at Jackson. There's a lot of similarity to pivot turns, but there are important differences. One important difference is all your weight is on the nose!? Hmmm.....

 

Fast is a relevant term in riding bumps. The folks who ride bumps at the highest speeds tend to have the biggest variation of board speed relative to speed of com. This means that the board gets accelerated ahead of the com, then gets used as speed control absorption as it is stalled waiting for the com to catch up. That catching up means a lot of weight shifting forward. Timing is key. Keeping all your weight in one spot (forward or back) makes life more difficult in the bumps.

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