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Noob Gear Question

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I've got an equipment question for a ski noob.

 

I'm 28 years old and just got off the mountain for my first day of skiing in my life. I truly enjoyed it and feel like I picked it up relatively fast. Going out tomorrow for a second day of fun in the snow.

 

Today I rented equipment to see if I would enjoy it enough to pursue purchasing equipment of my own. Well I did enjoy it and I've been looking online thinking I could get a pretty decent end of the season deal. I found the Fischer Motive 88's on the level nine sports site for, at least what I think is a good deal. My question is are these skis going to be too advanced for a beginner, or does it not make that much of a difference? Typically I hate buying something twice, so if these are skis I can grow into without having to purchase a beginner model now, that would be preferred (I also hate renting anything when I could put the money towards owning). Would these skis suit my needs? I would pretty much only be using them for east coast skiing.

 

My next question is in regards to size. My instructor today had me on a shorter set of skis as he said they would be easier to control to start off. I'm 6'4" and weigh 185. Most of the online ski size calculators suggest 180 - 200cm skis (I'm thinking the shorter size given my level of expertise, or lack there of). My instructor suggested I get with something in the 170 - 175 range (the motive 88's come in 176 so I thought that might be a decent option). If I go with 176's am I going to be kicking myself later wishing for a longer ski or would those suit me fine for a while? I'm certainly ok with upgrading skis at some point in the future, I'm just trying to avoid buying something now, then wanting something completely different come next winter.

 

Thanks in advanced for any suggestions.

post #2 of 12

176 should be fine, certainly well enough for your skills to improve in the next year.  By the time you have the ability to realize you may want something better, your skiing abilities will then be good enough to know what you want/need.  Going longer may work better when your skills have improved.  For now, 176 should allow you to learn the essentials and get more comfortable without having to fight the ski if it's too long.

 

Get the 176, BUT............

 

Seriously consider investing in boots and lessons before skis.  They are FAR more important than skis.  New skis won't make you a good skier, nor will they make your feet comfortable and capable.  See a real bootfitter if you can instead of going to the local sports shop (they won't know $h!t.  Tell us where you live and a real bootfitter can be recommended).

 

Best advice beginners get around here is: Boots and Lessons first, Skis later.

post #3 of 12

Welcome to the snowy side and EpicSki!  Since you are just getting started, be good to read the articles here:

http://www.epicski.com/atype/9/First_Run

 

How did the rental boots feel?  In general, getting boots that fit correctly from a ski "boot fitter" is the more important purchase than picking skis.  Where are you skiing?  Could be that someone could recommend a ski shop near you.  Note that buying ski boots is not like going to a big box sporting goods store to find a comfortable pair of running shoes.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses and the welcome! I will definitely checkout boots first. I'm currently in Bretton Woods NH for the next day of skiing. I live right outside of Boston. Does anyone have recommendations for boot fitters in either area? Is there a certain price range that makes some boots better then others or is it all about comfort? The rentals I was using felt ok. A little uncomfortable after 5 hours in them, but not bad. They were much heavier then I expected but got use to them fairly quickly.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Gunnerbob, you mentioned I should purchase boots and lessons before skis? I understand (at least now I do) that boots are the most important purchase. Is there a downside to buying them both at the same time? IE if I can afford everything is it still not a good idea? I wasn't sure if your recommendation was talking about order of operation while on a budget, or if its truly not a good idea to buy skis this early even after making the investment into a decent pair of boots.
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaystang View Post

Thanks for the responses and the welcome! I will definitely checkout boots first. I'm currently in Bretton Woods NH for the next day of skiing. I live right outside of Boston. Does anyone have recommendations for boot fitters in either area? Is there a certain price range that makes some boots better then others or is it all about comfort? The rentals I was using felt ok. A little uncomfortable after 5 hours in them, but not bad. They were much heavier then I expected but got use to them fairly quickly.

Summit Ski outside Framingham - worked with Paul in December and got fitted into a pair of Atomics. I had a great experience with them.
post #7 of 12

You can certainly purchase both boots and skis simultaneously.  I was assuming it was an either/or thing for you, if budget were an issue.  I must have misunderstood, apologies.  I was simply saying don't get skis INSTEAD of boots.  If you can do both, then certainly go ahead!

 

Try some lessons, you'll be pleasantly shocked at how much they'll help in th early going.  Get some good habits forming and then you'll be well on your way!  

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

You can certainly purchase both boots and skis simultaneously.  I was assuming it was an either/or thing for you, if budget were an issue.  I must have misunderstood, apologies.  I was simply saying don't get skis INSTEAD of boots.  If you can do both, then certainly go ahead!

 

Try some lessons, you'll be pleasantly shocked at how much they'll help in th early going.  Get some good habits forming and then you'll be well on your way!  


Thanks! No apologies necessary. I just wanted to make sure I understood correctly. I never mentioned boots in my post but if I move forward with it I'll def go for the full package.

Any thoughts on the motive 88's? Will they be too aggressive or anything for a beginner skier?
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzinboston View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaystang View Post

Thanks for the responses and the welcome! I will definitely checkout boots first. I'm currently in Bretton Woods NH for the next day of skiing. I live right outside of Boston. Does anyone have recommendations for boot fitters in either area? Is there a certain price range that makes some boots better then others or is it all about comfort? The rentals I was using felt ok. A little uncomfortable after 5 hours in them, but not bad. They were much heavier then I expected but got use to them fairly quickly.

Summit Ski outside Framingham - worked with Paul in December and got fitted into a pair of Atomics. I had a great experience with them.

Perfect I'll check them out, thanks.
post #10 of 12

What's your height/weight? Where will you primarily ski? It's a bit hard for anyone here to comment on specific skis without a bit more info.

 

My suspicion is they should work. There may be better ones and worse ones out there, but finding the right combination at the right price isn't always easy.  You could certainly do much worse than the 88's.  Wood and carbon core construction should work for your developing skill set without being overpowering if you go with a 176 length. I'm not a gear expert around here, others are more knowledgeable, but from what I know, they sound like they'll work for you.

post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the info.

I'm 6'4", 185 lbs. Will only be skiing east coast mountains (NH, VT, and ME).
post #12 of 12

At an aspiring intermediate level I would strongly suggest a season rental instead of purchasing outright with regards to the skis.  Your boots will stick with you as you advance assuming they fit well.  You will likely advance out of the optimal low to mid level skis though.  A seasonal rental may also give you the option to trade up/switch out if you decide you are ready for something longer or more discipline specific mid season.  Once you're rocking them down the blacks easily had have a better idea what you really want to focus on, bumps, gates/carving, all mountain, park/pipe then you could make a more focused investment in a high end pair of skis to keep for several seasons.  Plus, most seasonal rentals include some tune ups..

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