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Ski Tecnique help for moguls and glades on east coast

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I ski on the east coast, mostly Stowe, Sunday River, Sugarloaf.  I also ski 1-2 weeks in Tahoe every year.  I'm 5' 4", 145 lbs, aggressive skier.  I'm looking for some advice for bumps, moguls, and glades.  I currently ski 2010-11 Blizzard Magnum 8.1 Ti's in 158 cm and have new Tecnica 100 flex boots.
 
I love these skis on ice, groomers, small bumps.  I can get down moguls and glades, but sometimes I need to go 2-3 moguls wide if I start speeding up.  I've already signed up for a bump lesson at Okemo to work on my technique in moguls.  Soft moguls aren't bad, but the hard packed and icy moguls are difficult for me and I'm sure my absorbsion is the problem.  On the softer moguls I can slide the tails to slow myself down but I'm not sure how to control my speed on hard moguls.  I feel like my absorbtion doesn't slow me down - it just prevents me from being launched into the air.
 
For glades my ski doesn't always feel as maneuverable as I expect, especially if I make my own path down instead of following previous tracks.  Could this be tip dive?  I really focus on putting my weight more towards the back if I have trouble initiating a turn.  I'm assuming if I had the new version of the Magnum with tip rocker this would make it easier for me than doing all the weight shifting to keep the tips up.
 
For narrow or dense glades, I'm hesitant to go in them because I don't have the confidence to just ski them and take whatever path I see because of the turn initiation problems I've been having.

Edited by johnmtl - 3/3/13 at 3:40pm
post #2 of 27

You're already doing the right thing.  Sign up for a private lesson, zealously practice what you're taught, then sign up for another lesson...  Repeat as necessary until you're skiing at the level you hope to achieve. 

 

The key is actually practicing what the instructor taught you after the lesson is over.  If you don't understand why the instructor is teaching you to do something, ask a question.  If the instructor can't explain, get a different instructor.

 

Your fear in the glades likely stems from your concern that you will miss a turn.  When you have confidence in your turns your fear of the glades will diminish.

 

Some of the folks on this forum can recommend a good bump instructors at Stowe, Sunday River, Sugarloaf and Tahoe.  Some of the folks on this forum are good bump instructors at Stowe, Sunday River, Sugarloaf and Tahoe.

 

STE

post #3 of 27
Your glade skiing will improve when your bump skiing improves. Here in the east glade runs ARE bump runs, most of the time. It's fun to try different skis, but no ski is going to show you how to ski bumps and trees.

Who knows what things will be like by the time you read this, but at this moment conditions are friendly and primo for practicing these skills at Saddleback and (I imagine) Sugarloaf.
post #4 of 27
Quote:

Originally Posted by johnmtl View Post

 

I really focus on putting my weight more towards the back if I have trouble initiating a turn.  I'm assuming if I had the new version of the Magnum with tip rocker this would make it easier for me than doing all the weight shifting to keep the tips up.

 

 

This sounds way wrong to me, btw. I'd say that if you have trouble initiating it's BECAUSE your weight is toward the back. Did you mean "I really focus on NOT putting my weight more towards the back if I have trouble initiating a turn"? There's no use case I know of for intentionally going into the back seat except maybe for super-experts in very specific moments. I'll let a real coach opine on that.

 

Also, make sure you can really flex your ankles in those new boots. If you can't, loosen the cuff and/or have an adjustment made.

post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

 

This sounds way wrong to me, btw. I'd say that if you have trouble initiating it's BECAUSE your weight is toward the back. Did you mean "I really focus on NOT putting my weight more towards the back if I have trouble initiating a turn"? There's no use case I know of for intentionally going into the back seat except maybe for super-experts in very specific moments. I'll let a real coach opine on that.

 

Also, make sure you can really flex your ankles in those new boots. If you can't, loosen the cuff and/or have an adjustment made.

 

Whenever I do it, it may be a defense mechanism so that if I can't make the turn I'll have a more controlled fall.  I could just also be simply not driving my ski enough in the direction I want to go, and once I start to feel that I'm not turning I bail out.  Last weekend at Sugarloaf I found myself almost tucking in some of the random glades to avoid branches and found that I didn't have any problems turning in a crouched position so you're probably right that putting my weight back is the wrong move.

post #6 of 27

As others have mentioned, skiing bumps and skiing trees are pretty similar.

 

If you are finding yourself in the backseat, you are late in your turns and muscling yourself around.   Just as in carving, your weight needs to be centered on top of your skis.  I always tell learning skiers that everything happens between the balls of your feet and your heals where you need even pressure fro when you go on edge.

 

Concentrate on looking down field further to slow things down in your brain.  If you are looking down field, your brain will have processed the info before you get there making it easier to get your turn in a bit sooner to hit your mark.  It also helps to keep your arms up and forward  to help you keep pressure on the front of your boots, keeping your edges engaged.

 

For bumps, try skiing the edge of the bump field where the bumps are usually smaller and the snow softer.  Look for the snow bridges that connect the bumps and use them to prevent yourself from dropping into the icy troughs.  If you have a bump hill that is groomed on one side and bumped on the other, try the bumps right next to the groomed part giving you an "out" if you need to regroup, but don't stop,   Jump into the groomed part to get your rhythm back and then ease yourself back into the bump field.  Sometimes you can find a glade run where you can do the same thing.  When in the glades, focus on the spaces and not the trees.  You will go where you focus.  Look for lanes in the trees where you can link several turns down the fall line to control your speed.  When your lane closes up, cut across the hill and look for another or stop and regroup.

 

The skis you are using are a great all mountain ski for the east, but IMHO the 8.0 CA would have been a better choice for someone of your size and weight as it is a bit softer than the Ti version you have.

 

Above all, practice, practice, practice.  You don't learn to ski bumps by ripping groomers.  You have to jump in and take your licks.

 

Good luck,

 

Rick G

post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

As others have mentioned, skiing bumps and skiing trees are pretty similar.

 

If you are finding yourself in the backseat, you are late in your turns and muscling yourself around.   Just as in carving, your weight needs to be centered on top of your skis.  I always tell learning skiers that everything happens between the balls of your feet and your heals where you need even pressure fro when you go on edge.

 

Concentrate on looking down field further to slow things down in your brain.  If you are looking down field, your brain will have processed the info before you get there making it easier to get your turn in a bit sooner to hit your mark.  It also helps to keep your arms up and forward  to help you keep pressure on the front of your boots, keeping your edges engaged.

 

For bumps, try skiing the edge of the bump field where the bumps are usually smaller and the snow softer.  Look for the snow bridges that connect the bumps and use them to prevent yourself from dropping into the icy troughs.  If you have a bump hill that is groomed on one side and bumped on the other, try the bumps right next to the groomed part giving you an "out" if you need to regroup, but don't stop,   Jump into the groomed part to get your rhythm back and then ease yourself back into the bump field.  Sometimes you can find a glade run where you can do the same thing.  When in the glades, focus on the spaces and not the trees.  You will go where you focus.  Look for lanes in the trees where you can link several turns down the fall line to control your speed.  When your lane closes up, cut across the hill and look for another or stop and regroup.

 

The skis you are using are a great all mountain ski for the east, but IMHO the 8.0 CA would have been a better choice for someone of your size and weight as it is a bit softer than the Ti version you have.

 

Makes sense that I'm late on my turns especially your description of muscling my way through.  In other sports I've always been able to muscle through in general so you're probably spot on.  I don't exactly focus on being more energy efficient unless I find I don't have the stamina.  After reading everyone else's advice, I think I may also be fatigued probably from using up so much extra energy.

 

I'm definitely committing myself to moguls and glades going forward.  I've been looking for the bumpy sections on the sides especially to warm up and also because they're not always as steep so I'm not overly concerned about my speed.

 

Funny you mention the 8.0 CA because I've also been reading a lot about skis lately and if I had to do it all over again with a 1-ski quiver I'd probably get the 8.0 CA.  I have the 8.1 Ti's because I wanted to get a ski biased to front side skiing that could handle ice, and my idea was getting a second set of skis heavily biased to moguls and glades.  I don't think I ski enough west coast to justify a 3 ski quiver.  I know I should just focus on technique at the moment, but it's also hard to avoid reading about new equipment especially with demo's becoming available.

post #8 of 27

Another point when you're practicing on intermediate level bumps is to practice steady arms forward pole plants and timing them w/ your turns............ that helps to keep your rhythm going.......... also use those timing exercises to help to concentrate on breathing........... you'd be surprised at how many pple run out of steam bec they are not breathing enough..............  monitor your breaths........and ditto on Rick G ..........Practice, Practice, Practice............... start out mellow and work your way steeper..........

post #9 of 27

slow line fast

post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmtl View Post

 

Makes sense that I'm late on my turns especially your description of muscling my way through.  In other sports I've always been able to muscle through in general so you're probably spot on.  I don't exactly focus on being more energy efficient unless I find I don't have the stamina.  After reading everyone else's advice, I think I may also be fatigued probably from using up so much extra energy.

 

I'm definitely committing myself to moguls and glades going forward.  I've been looking for the bumpy sections on the sides especially to warm up and also because they're not always as steep so I'm not overly concerned about my speed.

 

Funny you mention the 8.0 CA because I've also been reading a lot about skis lately and if I had to do it all over again with a 1-ski quiver I'd probably get the 8.0 CA.  I have the 8.1 Ti's because I wanted to get a ski biased to front side skiing that could handle ice, and my idea was getting a second set of skis heavily biased to moguls and glades.  I don't think I ski enough west coast to justify a 3 ski quiver.  I know I should just focus on technique at the moment, but it's also hard to avoid reading about new equipment especially with demo's becoming available.

 

Concerning your skis, the 8.0ti is a great front side carver yet wide enough to handle some mixed conditions so I would not fret your ski choice.  I was just making an observation.  My all moutain eastern ski is a Volkl AC30 which is also 80 underfoot and fairly stiff, but I wieigh 190 and can bend them when I need to,  I have had folks on here tell me that the AC30 is a lousy bump ski yet I love them in the bumps.   A stiffer ski can work well in the bumps, but you really need good technigue to make them work, as you can easily get launched.  I have even taken my Volkl Racetiger GS Speedwalls and my Blizzard SL Race Mag IQ's in the bumps after my races and they both work suprisingly well, espeically the shorter Blizzard SL's.  A softer ski, though ultimately not as high performance, will be more forgiving and will mask some technique flaws...to a point.  But if you learn to ski your 8,0Ti's well in the bumps you will acquire some awesome skills that you will find very useful all over the mountain especially as you explore off piste.

 

For a softer ski to add to your quiver that will be good in bumps and good for exploration off piste, I would reccomend the Blizzard Bushwacker or the Rossi Exp 88.  Neither are dedicated bump or off piste skis but both make a good compromise choice for that type of skiing yet can still rip groomers fairly well,

 

Good luck and practice, practice, practice even if conditions are icey.  You never know when you will find yourself on a double black diamond run somewhere that is bumped as well as skied off and icey.  You will be glad that you practiced on some more moderate icey bumps back home.

 

Rick G

post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

Good luck and practice, practice, practice even if conditions are icey.  You never know when you will find yourself on a double black diamond run somewhere that is bumped as well as skied off and icey.  You will be glad that you practiced on some more moderate icey bumps back home.

 

Rick G

 

I definitely agree.  I want to get my technique down so that I don't have to worry about which path I should take or avoid, or what ski I chose to use for the day (as easy as it is to blame the equipment, I know my technique has a lot of room for improvement and that would be the biggest difference maker).  Thanks everyone for the constructive feedback

post #12 of 27

One more suggestion.  Ty to find a ski partner who is better in the bumps than you and play follow the leader.  By following a better bump skier and taking their line, it eliminates one of your decisions, where do I turn?  That will allow you to concentrate more on your technique, rather than which line to take as that decison is being made for you.

 

In the end there are two types of skiers.  Those who never learned to properly ski bumps and end up hating them and those who have learned how to ski bumps and LOVE them.  I have never met a good bump skier who says they don't like skiing bumps, quite the opposite.  Yet I have met many a skier who will tell me they hate bumps, or use to ski bumps but can no longer do so because of xyz.  I say bullpoop!  If you know how to ski bumps, you ski bumps because bump skiing is big time FUN!.  If you don't know how, you make up excuses and head for the groomers.

 

I am 58 and still ski bumps whenever I get the chance.  OK, maybe I can't ski them all day long anymore like I did when much younger due to muscle fatique, aches and pain but I still ski them till my body screams No mas!  Then I head for the groomers with the rest of the pussies.  LOL

 

Bump on!

 

Rick G

post #13 of 27
This may be a repeat of what a few others have said, but imo in the bumps it's important to have a "quiet" upper body. My focus is on letting my knees and hips do the work. The only thing that I actively try to move above my waist is my wrists for pole planting. This helps to maintain your balance... It's also important to be looking ahead a bump or 2 rather than the one you are hitting.
post #14 of 27

Just a different suggestion.  Pick a steep groomer and ski the very tight left edge or very tight right edge of the trail and ski it SLOW.  Force yourself to ski it slow and make very quick deliberate turns across the fall line.

 

Why?

 

My point is you need a controlled environment on which to work on keeping your weight up yet unweighting properly to transition your turns.  Get confident swinging tight turns.  BUT THE GOING SLOW PART IS KEY B/C WHEN YOU FORCE YOURSELF TO GO SLOWER YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HAVE POOR TECHNIQUE AND GET BACKSEAT.  Use your turn across the fall line to keep your speed in check and work up to a point where you are able to just throw it around on a VERY tight line.

 

Say Nosedive at Stowe - this will not work on unless it is groomed with good pitch.

 

What I believe this will do for you?

 

Turn you into a skier.

post #15 of 27

I've never been taught how to ski them, I've just watched alot of other people and here are a few things that I think helped me get better.

1. Weight forward. The knees and hips are shock absorbers and as they bend to absorb the bump, Kees and hips extend into the trough and retract as your body "compresses" into the bump. This keeps your upper body quiet (quiet means not bending at the waist causing your head move up and down, throwing you off balance). This keeps you balanced and centered.

2. Hands forward. From the waist up I try to be facing squarely down the hill. Hips and knees do all the moving.

3. Quick wrists. Poles are planted with a flick with the wrist not a reach with the shoulder.  Pole strap should be held in your palm.

4. Parrallel turns.  If you cant ski with your feet together you caan't ski bums or trees.
 

 

5. Finally...and this really helped me. Start by skiing one bump at a time.  Stand in the mogul field and ski just one bump then stop, then slowly let them slide again and ski one bump then stop.  I found I was trying to ski them too fast at first and I always got out of the fall line and then it was all over. One bump at a time right down the zipper line was the easiest way to learn for me.

 

EDIT: Pole strap should go around the back of the wrist and then under your palm and come up between your thumb and index finger if that makes any sense to anyone LOL.  Allows you to swing the pole like a pendulum using only your thumb and index finger.


Edited by rank - 3/4/13 at 6:53pm
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by rank View Post
5. Finally...and this really helped me. Start by skiing one bump at a time.  Stand in the mogul field and ski just one bump then stop, then slowly let them slide again and ski one bump then stop.  I found I was trying to ski them too fast at first and I always got out of the fall line and then it was all over. One bump at a time right down the zipper line was the easiest way to learn for me.

Interesting, I'm going to give that a try next time I'm at the mountain, makes a lot of sense.

post #17 of 27

Perhaps next February: http://www.asiaski.com/bumpfest.htm.  Two full days of mogul instruction from great teachers at a reasonable price.  

post #18 of 27

If you've ever seen me ski moguls, you'll know to take this with a serious dose of salt.  But... echoing what others have said above, what started to work for me as an aspiring and improving bumper was taking certain drills on groomers to learn to release edges, skid, and twist the skis beneath you with a quiet upper body facing downhill, and bringing those skills to the bumps.  Drills like "falling leaves," 360s, skiing down a tight corridor on a steep groomer just rotating your legs on flat skis, etc.  If you can do those slowly on a steep groomer, it will translate well in the bumps.  Also practice pulling your legs back under you in an exaggerated way at first, since the tendency in the bumps is to lean back into the hill and get in the back seat.  Finally, if a bump is particularly gnarly/icy/steep trough, no shame in skidding down it to scrub speed and keep rhythm, and turning in a more convenient spot.  

post #19 of 27
My other thoughts are (and this comes from someone who was on a 15 or so year hiatus from skiing...) : skiing bumps on shaped skis is different than skiing on old, straight skis. My straight 195's are easier to skid and slide, whereas the few shaped skis I demoed were much happier trying to carve through the bumps. I liked carving. It felt clean and smooth (compared to the "bashing" on my old skis), but as previous posters have said, sometimes you just need to skid off some speed. I think skidding is just a bit tougher on wide, shaped skis.
The other thing you could do is look up javelin turns on YouTube. It's a drill that could be useful.
post #20 of 27
+2 on the slow thing. You can't ski bumps or trees fast until you can ski them slowly, and you can't ski them slowly until you can ski them REALLY slowly. When I start flailing, which is often, starting over with a long pause and radically reduced speed almost always results in an effective reset. Make your friends wait, if that's what it takes.
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADKS View Post

  Also practice pulling your legs back under you in an exaggerated way at first, since the tendency in the bumps is to lean back into the hill and get in the back seat. 

I second that.  When you hit the bump and your legs start to retract the tendency is for your feet to be in front of you. retracting the feet back under you, or moving the upper body down the hill, or tipping the ski tips down the downhill side of the bump (they're all different ways of feeling the same thing) gets you out of the back seat.  The other thing I learned recently was that unless you're skiing a zipper line (and why would you be reading this if you were) plant your pole downhill but somewhat behind your downhill foot (this implies that at the time you plant your skis are pointed obliquely across the hill, not straight downhill). This keeps your shoulders turned downhill like they're supposed to be.  47 years of skiing and I actually learned something this year.  Sure wish I'd learned it about 46 years of miserable bumps ago.  

post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

+2 on the slow thing. You can't ski bumps or trees fast until you can ski them slowly, and you can't ski them slowly until you can ski them REALLY slowly. When I start flailing, which is often, starting over with a long pause and radically reduced speed almost always results in an effective reset. Make your friends wait, if that's what it takes.

 

So I was skiing at Stowe last weekend and didn't ski the moguls till the afternoon. The troughs were icy and most of the bumps had some slush on them. The main thing I was focusing on was not getting back seat, but I was really gaining speed after each bump when I tried to zipper-line and spent most of the time going 2 wide to manage my speed, even on the blue mogul runs. Am I not absorbing enough on each mogul to control my speed? Not using the back side of the mogul enough? Doesn't look like I'll have time to schedule a lesson for the rest of the season with my work schedule, so all my skiing trips going forward are going to be spur of the moment but I'm definitely doing lessons at the beginning of next season.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmtl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

+2 on the slow thing. You can't ski bumps or trees fast until you can ski them slowly, and you can't ski them slowly until you can ski them REALLY slowly. When I start flailing, which is often, starting over with a long pause and radically reduced speed almost always results in an effective reset. Make your friends wait, if that's what it takes.

 

So I was skiing at Stowe last weekend and didn't ski the moguls till the afternoon. The troughs were icy and most of the bumps had some slush on them. The main thing I was focusing on was not getting back seat, but I was really gaining speed after each bump when I tried to zipper-line and spent most of the time going 2 wide to manage my speed, even on the blue mogul runs. Am I not absorbing enough on each mogul to control my speed? Not using the back side of the mogul enough? Doesn't look like I'll have time to schedule a lesson for the rest of the season with my work schedule, so all my skiing trips going forward are going to be spur of the moment but I'm definitely doing lessons at the beginning of next season.

 

 

Reminder: I am not a real coach; I only play one on EpicSki. wink.gif
 
Don't try to ski the zipper line. You have to walk before you can run. Especially if the bumps are big and/or icy. In fact, I don't even bother with icy bumps if I have the choice. That's why they invented grooming. But slushy bumps are good. You can work with those. See below for why the troughs don't matter much.
 
So, next time, try this: Go off by yourself with no peer pressure. Start skiing down an EASY bump run. Should be an easy blue level pitch. Your speed down the hill should mimic a slow walk. Seriously. You are barely moving. Let your feet and ankles and knees and fingers relax. Hop up and down gently a few times to shake things out. Your joints should feel flexible and ready to conform to the terrain. It's not a GS race: You don't need to get all clenched up and edge like you have something to prove. Now, On each mogul, try to make TWO easy but quick turns. That's right: TWO. You can make these turns on the front, the top, the sides, or even the back - whatever works. Do NOT make them in the trough. Proceed - preferably across the shallowest, least abrupt available trough - to the next mogul. Repeat. TWO turns on the mogul. If you get going too fast, stop and start over. If you are still going too fast, try making THREE turns on each mogul.
 
The point here is dramatically to drive home the point that you have to pack TONS of turns into your mogul run - WAY more than you would on a groomer. If you aren't making tons of turns, each turn has too much riding on it. This is a problem in two ways: 1)If you miss one turn, you're off to the races. 2) You will be tempted to bring your skis too far around out of the fall line to check speed, which can lead to a variety of problems in bumps (and trees). You should be making so many turns you can afford to miss a few and still be okay. You don't need a ton of speed control in each turn if you make enough of them. Most important, practicing this skill will allow you to make a little turn on a dime at will in exactly the right spots ... which you will start learning to pick out. Never wait for the "right" spot. If you wait, you'll be too late and start rocketing off on one of those demoralizing traverses.
 
Once you master this exercise, you may be able to back off your turn frequency on easy runs, and start to blend in some other speed control tactics. But the "tons of turns" tactic is one you should always carry in your toolbox, to fall back on when the going gets gnarly.
 
Hope this helps. Now we can let the real instructors tell us how I messed you up. smile.gif
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmtl View Post

 

So I was skiing at Stowe last weekend and didn't ski the moguls till the afternoon. The troughs were icy and most of the bumps had some slush on them. The main thing I was focusing on was not getting back seat, but I was really gaining speed after each bump when I tried to zipper-line and spent most of the time going 2 wide to manage my speed, even on the blue mogul runs.Am I not absorbing enough on each mogul to control my speed? Not using the back side of the mogul enough? Doesn't look like I'll have time to schedule a lesson for the rest of the season with my work schedule, so all my skiing trips going forward are going to be spur of the moment but I'm definitely doing lessons at the beginning of next season.

 

 

Read the posts above yours about pulling the legs back.  This is one of those faith moves at speed since it's a commitment to forward motion and requires a followup move, i.e, if you don't extend you'll face plant.  But if you can get past that uneasy feeling and manage a rhythm of extend-pull-extend-pull you'll find that with each pull you return to a neutral position and your turns become more effective at speed control.

post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 

Quote:
Originally Posted by savemeasammy View Post

My other thoughts are (and this comes from someone who was on a 15 or so year hiatus from skiing...) : skiing bumps on shaped skis is different than skiing on old, straight skis. My straight 195's are easier to skid and slide, whereas the few shaped skis I demoed were much happier trying to carve through the bumps. I liked carving. It felt clean and smooth (compared to the "bashing" on my old skis), but as previous posters have said, sometimes you just need to skid off some speed. I think skidding is just a bit tougher on wide, shaped skis.
The other thing you could do is look up javelin turns on YouTube. It's a drill that could be useful.

 

So I looked up javelin turns, I think part of my technique problem is I use my hips too much on each turn - probably the hockey player in me.  I know my hips don't stay square going down the hill.  Could be not enough flex in my ankle.  I'll work on the one leg drills next time.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

If you aren't making tons of turns, each turn has too much riding on it. This is a problem in two ways: 1)If you miss one turn, you're off to the races. 2) You will be tempted to bring your skis too far around out of the fall line to check speed, which can lead to a variety of problems in bumps (and trees). You should be making so many turns you can afford to miss a few and still be okay. You don't need a ton of speed control in each turn if you make enough of them. 

 

I'll definitely try this. Your second point is probably the reason why I go from zipper line across 2 moguls because I check my speed with a stronger turn that puts me out of position to make my next turn.  I'm not surprised either because I can tell I'm building speed after each mogul so it's just a matter of time until something bad happens.  I mention the icy troughs because I'm not sure if I'm picking up speed here or if there's something different I could be doing.  But I think I need to work on disconnecting my hips from my legs more and the multiple turns.

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnmtl View Post

 

Your second point is probably the reason why I go from zipper line across 2 moguls because I check my speed with a stronger turn that puts me out of position to make my next turn.  I'm not surprised either because I can tell I'm building speed after each mogul so it's just a matter of time until something bad happens.  I mention the icy troughs because I'm not sure if I'm picking up speed here or if there's something different I could be doing.  But I think I need to work on disconnecting my hips from my legs more and the multiple turns.

 

If you want to ski bumps and glades in a zipperline (or a direct line) approach, my suggestion would be to get some lessons from a freestyle mogul coach. Go to an adult summer camp, I skied with some buds that have done that and they all have a great time. Or check out ski areas close by that have a freestyle program, ask if you can tag along just to see the drills they make the kids go through. If you are near the VT& NH border off of 89 or go up that way to Stow, hook up with Evan Dybvig at Whaleback. He coaches their freestyle program and has taught over at Killington. He is availble for lessons if you plan ahead.

post #27 of 27

A few of my non dedicated ski friends have asked me and my ski partners over the years how to ski moguls or get better in the moguls and I dont want to make a throw away comment however I always say  its all about time and leg stregnth.

 

Skiing moguls is very different than skiing any other goormed,ice,or crud laden trail. Its much more of an athletic pursuit. So dont think anything you read or watch or get told to you off hand will make up for time in the bumps. and being in the best shape you can be. If you do not have the stamina or leg and core strength to power through a steep line you will bail out  every time. I am old now but competed in bump contests in the 90's while in my 20's in the East and would ski every run on every visit to the mt in the bumps no matter if they were rock hard ice bumps on Outerlimits or crap lines on some intermediate run. I also would do heavy squats, run  and mt bike all off season all focused on skiing moguls.

 

I have witnessed a few friends who didnt ski a ton but would ski with us for the season in the bumps every week.  After 2 seasons they became very confident and improved 10 fold just by putting time and  skiing bumps everyday.

 

Also, maybe this is part of your challenge:Are they Full camber and a sidewall? 

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.1 IQ Max CA Skis with IQ Max 12 Bindings - The Magnum 8.1 IQ Max CA is the Swiss army knife of the Magnum series. Built around an 81mm waist profile and a medium turn shape the Magnum 8.1 is most happy on trail but has enough width to comfortably slay open bowls and the occasional tree or bump run.

 

I never skiid a dedicated mogul ski as I found them way to soft in the tail so I would use an SL ski that had flex but could turn very quick. Get a quicker turning sk (more like 70's underfoot)i for the glades and bumps and spend every waking moment of a single season in them and you will be on your way. 

 

Good luck!

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