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Skill Level

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Question for all you ski experts:

Is there a minimal skill level that is necessary to enjoy (not necessarily exploit) the Kastle M83 skis?  I'm 185 lbs., 5'9 inches, 63 years old.  I currently ski Blizzard Magnum IQ 7.6 (170 cm) but want to move up a little bit in width and quality of ski; mostly on piste, eastern skier, but the occasional 3-4 inches of morning powder too. Thanks for your input.

post #2 of 12

You'll be fine. Go slow and learn the ski, what it likes, sweet spot, how it reacts to varying snow...etc. 

post #3 of 12

I think that would be a singularly poor choice for a person your age, unless you can compensate for age with skills and fitness. The ski has a race ski style tail, square and flat, that has a lot of rebound, stiff. Takes real precision to drive it well. Kaestle, and other companies, make more user friendly models. 

post #4 of 12

Give to me a break; he said he was 63, not 93.

post #5 of 12

The MX83, or any of the MX skis from Kastle have a special quality, that quality is a huge sweet-spot. They perform great but are easy to ski, you will love them.

post #6 of 12
Michaelfahlund--that ski (do you mean MX 83?) will be fine, I'm sure, as long as you don't overdo the length of it. Especially if you intend to ski it mostly on groomed or firm snow, I expect you'll enjoy it most in a length about the same as your current skis--173cm. If you like "turny" skis, I'd even consider the 163cm model, with a 15.5m sidecut (according to the manufacturer). That's a slalom ski length, but not quite the tight-radius sidecut of a true slalom ski. The shorter length won't be quite as forgiving in the "occasional 3-4 inches of morning powder" you've described, and they will be more challenging especially in deep powder, but they'll be a lot of fun on the harder and groomed snow you've described. (And no matter what many will tell you, they will actually work well in a little powder and crud, at least if you ski them with skill and finesse.)

With a fine ski like these Kastles, I cannot highly enough recommend that you check them out first with the help and eye of a good instructor--particularly if you get them in the shorter lengths. They'll be unbelievably fun, IF you ski them like the fine and precise tools that they are. If you push them around the way so many skiers do, they won't work any better than any other ski, and may well not feel as "easy" to ski as your current skis.

To answer your original question--it's really not so much a question of skill level as of what you are trying to do with the skis at any level. Those skis are meant to slice and glide, to slide through the snow the direction they're pointed, rather than skidding and braking sideways, as a rule. Yes, they'll work as brakes too, but no better than most skis, and it's not what you're paying for.

Have fun with them, and keep us posted!

Best regards,
Bob
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you all!  Now, the trick is to find somewhere in the east that has Kastles to demo! Any suggestions?  I ski mostly at Stratton.
 

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I think that would be a singularly poor choice for a person your age, unless you can compensate for age with skills and fitness. The ski has a race ski style tail, square and flat, that has a lot of rebound, stiff. Takes real precision to drive it well. Kaestle, and other companies, make more user friendly models. 

 

What Kastles would you suggest if there are other Kastle's that are more user friendly?  I would appreciate your thoughts.  Thanks!
 

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelfahlund View Post

Thank you all!  Now, the trick is to find somewhere in the east that has Kastles to demo! Any suggestions?  I ski mostly at Stratton.
 

 

I don't know if there is a dealer at Stratton (probably is), but Boot Pro over at Okemo has demos. 

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelfahlund View Post

 

What Kastles would you suggest if there are other Kastle's that are more user friendly?  I would appreciate your thoughts.  Thanks!
 


I've only seen a few people skiing the MX very well. And they ski every day. I assume you have other responsibilities if you live in New York, and get out less than that, is all.  I'd think the tail on the FX is more versatile. Bob B always has a solid take on skills involved. I'd go with his approach.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


I've only seen a few people skiing the MX very well. And they ski every day. I assume you have other responsibilities if you live in New York, and get out less than that, is all.  I'd think the tail on the FX is more versatile. Bob B always has a solid take on skills involved. I'd go with his approach.

Probably start with LX over FX for mostly on-piste...
post #12 of 12

At Stratton Equipe (at the base in the village) has them.

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