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MA Please

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

So I want to start off my apologizing for the video.  For whatever reason, my dad sucks at filming me while skiing.  So I apologize if you get nauseous with all the shaking.

 

Also, sorry for it being so long but I figured I'd just throw all the clips of my skiing in there, the good, the bad and the ugly this way you could get a good feel for my abilities and maybe find a few seconds where it's not shaking uncontrollably haha

 

I've been skiing since I'm a little kid but never really took many lessons cause I was a stubborn little brat so pretty much just learned by following my dad around.

 

I typically get in maybe 5 days a year and that's on a good year.

 

I went to Utah in 2011 with my pops for a few days (been there 3 times) and then last year was the first year I didn't ski at all in I don't even know how long.  This year we took a day trip to a small mountain a few hours from us and then went to Jackson Hole for a few days as part of my college graduation present.

 

I rented Volkyl Gotamas, which is the widest ski I've ever been on before.  The first day I skied on 178s which I knew was going to be too long for me but the rental guy told me the 170s would be like noodles, so I trusted his judgement.  I didn't like how long they were so for the next 2 days of skiing I skied the 170s and liked them a lot better.  (I'm 5'11" and between 165 and 170 I'd say).

 

Anyways, I don't get to ski much but I absolutely love it and at least personally think I'm doing pretty well for the very limited amount of skiing I get to do.  But I'd really really like to be able to improve.  I know I don't get the opportunity to work on my technique much but with a little help from you guys at least I'll have some things in mind to work on while I am on the slopes.

 

So let me know what you guys think and what I should work on.  If you could say what I'm doing wrong and then what I should do to correct that and maybe give me a unique way to think of it to help me make the correct movements, that would be great.

 

 

Thanks guy!

post #2 of 19

Nice skiing. Maybe the turns were a bit too abrupt? I suppose I would feel more comfortable in that condition and terrain with a narrower stance and would pull the feet back under the body more. But I'm no instructor, just an avid skier with a similar number of days on snow (more in the past couple yearssmile.gif).

 

I always dream of going to Jackson Hole. How was it?

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckT View Post

Nice skiing. Maybe the turns were a bit too abrupt? I suppose I would feel more comfortable in that condition and terrain with a narrower stance and would pull the feet back under the body more. But I'm no instructor, just an avid skier with a similar number of days on snow (more in the past couple yearssmile.gif).

 

I always dream of going to Jackson Hole. How was it?

 

Well snow wise, we unfortunately went at a time where they hadn't seen much snow.  We got about 2-3" the first 2 days we skied which was nice but other than that a lot of the mountain was hard and ice over.

 

Other than that though, I absolutely loved the place.  It's very steep and challenging pretty much all over which is what I love.  As others have said, the vertical is like nothing I've skied before.  Like I said I've been to Utah 3 times and have skied a lot of the mountains there but the vertical at Jackson Hole seemed like a whole other league.  Maybe it was just because the steepness was sustained for longer, I don't know.

 

I absolutely loved the town.  I thought it was such a cool place.  Being from NY you don't get to see elk and moose and deer and cowboys and things like that ever, so it was really cool to see that kind of stuff.  The town really had an older western feel that I really liked.

 

Just the whole country vibe was awesome.

 

Overall, absolutely loved it.  Definitely need to go back and hopefully catch better conditions.

post #4 of 19

Double your pleasure, double your fun... by actually skiing the whole turn instead of only the bottom half.  Admittedly I only watched the first 2 minutes, but you're basically skiing with linked hockey stops.  Pursue learning how to manage your skis through the entire turn and you should find a much greater degree of control.

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

Double your pleasure, double your fun... by actually skiing the whole turn instead of only the bottom half.  Admittedly I only watched the first 2 minutes, but you're basically skiing with linked hockey stops.  Pursue learning how to manage your skis through the entire turn and you should find a much greater degree of control.

 

Could you provide me with some advice as to how to engage my skis earlier in my turn?

post #6 of 19

First of all, Congrats on graduation.

Second, I applaud you for being brave enough to post video of yourself. MA can be brutal to one's ego. I hope you take this post as an attempt to help, but the first part may be tough.

 

Didn't watch a whole lot either but want to test out some MA practice for myself.

Sorry for the huge amount of info. Hopefully the other instructors here will help me out with the rest.

 

Hopefully this will help you as well.

 

I see an athletic skier, Male, Age *

Appears to be comfortable in the terrain he is in. Skiing somewhat aggressively

Turn size is a medium turn on a fairly steep pitch.

Turn shape is kind of a z shaped. There is a good amount of symmetry but I see a slight difference in the turn initiation with a Higher lifting of the inside ski when going to his right.

Turn type is a skidded not too high performance turn.

 

Balance looks centered to aft. evidenced by the slight flex in the ankle and more flex in the knee and hips which puts his hips behind his feet for most of the time. I see a pretty static stance. Flex/extension seems to be more from terrain and management of pressure rather than active movement through the range of motion.

 

Edge angles seem to be mostly generated by a push to the edge in the fall line and then higher edge angles generated by terrain at the bottom of the turn.. Not a lot of angles being built by knees or hips.(banking if you will)

 

Turning power in the first few turns seems to be a full body rotation. As the speed built and the forces under his feet got stronger, there was a little more separation in the upper and lower body. The skier seem to start to ski into an appropriate amount of counter but then allowed the hips to square up some to his skis in the transition rather than maintain the counter. The pole plants seemed effective in helping with timing but did little to stabilize the upper body or moving the CoM forward and down the hill.

 

Pressure at the top of the turn is released with an up movement to unweight the skis and a slight change of edges. Then the feet are pushed out to the fall line rather than steered onto an edge at the top of the turn. Then as the edges engage, the skier seems to manage the pressure by just standing against the skis. Pressure increases at the bottom of each turn and seems to be managed by bracing with muscle rather as the skier is not "stacked" with bone structure. The joints for the most part seem to be pretty static.

 

Equipment. The skis look to be a wide rockered ski (also as confirmed by OP's comments which I didn't read until after as an attempt to do the MA first) The lack of ankle movement could be a case of a too stiff boot or lack of ankle mobility. It could also be a case of not having learned to move the shin into the front of the boot well. The above mention of asymmetry may also be a symptom of an alignment problem (cant) and the skier having an edge lockup and having to compensate for this in the releasing of the old edges. Pole length seems appropriate. Maybe a little longer pole might get him to stand up a little more.

 

Overall

 

Pretty good athletic skiing.. Looks fun and powerful.

 

Where I would take a lesson with this skier?

 

After a check of gear to confirm or exclude equipment issues (cant, stiffness of boot, etc)

 

I would be looking to guide the student to shape the top of the turn more. Working this part of the turn should involve some rotary refinement to turn and guide the ski through the top of the turn. In the process I would expect that the exercises used to do this will also create some more separation in the upper and lower body, move the CoM forward through the top of the turn, and change the use of flex/extend movements to allow for better pressure management and a more efficient stance.

 

Drills and exercises to follow after I get home from my Sunday duties. (church and a birthday celebration for my dad)

post #7 of 19
I'd like to see you stand taller. My thighs would be burning if I skied in your crouch, and I ski nearly 150 days a season.

You appear to be trying to get each turn over as quickly as possible (Z-shape) by pointing the skis the other way rapidly rather than releasing the ski edges, letting them point toward the fun line and then engaging the new edges to complete the turn. As David noted, you are moving the tails of the skis uphill instead of turning the tips downhill. Those last nice, round turns near the end (6-7 minute mark) are what you want to be using more.
post #8 of 19

Hmm. Upon my re-reading my MA

 

Turning power at first starts as full body rotation. as the speed builds, turns further down seem to have a little more "turn" and this seems to be more of an effect of the snow/ski interaction than of any active steering from the skier. Turns are rushed and little time is spent in the fall line.

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

dchan:  really in depth stuff and really appreciate you taking a look and taking the time to analyze my skiing.  Glad we can help each other out here haha

 

In your follow up post, would you be able to maybe "dumb it down" a bit for me?  I don't know much about the technical mechanics and what not, so while I can figure out some of the things you mentioned by looking at my video slowly and reading what you said, a lot of it is kind of just mumbo jumbo to me.  Could you maybe respond as if we were talking in person and you were giving me a private lesson?  (If that makes more sense to you)

 

If we were in a private lesson, what kind of things would you tell me to think about when skiing?  I don't really have the time for drills since I don't get to ski a lot but when I do ski, I try to keep some things i've picked up on these forums in mind in terms of my movements.  So if you could give me some tips on what I should be doing/thinking to improve my skiing that would be great!

 

Kneale Brownson:  My thighs do burn quite a bit when skiing! haha  I never realized quite how crouched I was until I watched this video.  I don't even realize it when I'm skiing.  I think it definitely has something to do with my mindset of making sure I'm forward and press my shins into the tongue of my boots.

 

The Z-shape thing is something that was mentioned to me 2 years ago when I posted some video from Utah in 2011.  I definitely notice it more in a lot of my turns here.  It definitely has to do with the fact, although the videos don't show it, I'm on pretty steep terrain and I guess since I don't engage my skis in the top of the turn, I throw my skis around at the bottom to control speed.  Does this sound like it could be the reason?

 

As I asked of dchan, would you be able to give me some movements/mechanical stuff I can think about next time I'm on the slopes?

 

thanks guys!  I really appreciate the help b/c I really really want to get better.  Every time I'm on the mountain I want to improve.  I like to have fun, challenge myself and improve every time I'm on the slopes.  So you guys can really help me out here
 

post #10 of 19

I think dchan made some pretty accurate observations.  I will probably stay out of this one as we actually skied together, if you want a lesson from me you might need to book one.  You are a good skier, but your dad is better and doesn't work as hard.  You should probably continue taking lessons from him.  

 

Old Guys Rule! cool.gif

post #11 of 19

mcl116

 

Don't worry. I was planning to.

 

The detailed MA was for my benefit, hoping some of the other higher level instructors and examiners might help me refine my MA skills. No way would I give a student the same "MA" with all the technical info..

 

So, in a lesson with you  I would let you know that I like the energy and tempo of your skiing. Obviously there are some good things going on. Athletic movements. strong muscles to really redirect the skis, etc..

 

I would then explain that I would like to see you stand taller so you can engage some different muscles and start to use your skeletal structure to support your weight instead of all the muscles in your thighs. When we open our hips and knees up a bit, then we can start to turn our legs and control how much or how little we want to turn our feet more accurately.

 

I would probably have you get off your skis and have you feel what it feels like to stand a little taller, unfold your joints some, and then turn your legs under your hips. First I would hold your feet still, with you in that "squatty" stance and have you try to rotate your feet. Then I would have you stand taller, get your hips up over the fronts of the arches and then have you attempt to turn your feet while I held them still. This generally gives the skier a chance to see what it really feels like to start to engage the proper muscles.

 

So with that taller stance, I would then have you do some "boot arcs" using our poles to hold us up so we can be "on the front of our boots"  this is done by standing in the snow and facing down hill. extend your poles out in front of you and place them in the snow such that you can lean on them with straight arms, but not quite falling over down the hill. Shift your weight over to one foot pick up the other foot, turn the foot that you picked up and place it in the snow behind you pointing 90 degrees to your side and about 1 boot length back. Now maintaining snow contact with that boot, scribe an arc in the snow with your boot as if you were edging it around. It should end up in front of you facing 90 degrees across your path and about a boot length in front of your "planted" foot. You should try to keep your hips from turning with the arcing foot and facing forward. how much or how far you can go without keeping your hips straight will depend on your flexibility. You should also keep shin contact with the tongue of your boots through this whole exercise. You will find that if you maintain that tongue shin contact that your CoM will have to move forward and over the boots to accomplish this. You hopefully will also have to start to try to flex or bend the "planted" boot a little (or lot) to complete this exercise. As your "arcing boot" completes its path you will turn it to face forward, move your poles down the hill a little farther and repeat the drill on the opposite side. This is a very short exercise but gives you the feel of a lot of things including proper turning of the feet, shaping of a turn through the whole turn, moving the CoM forward and into the new turn and hopefully some flex/extend to get the boot into the position in front of you.

 

Now using some of these new feelings in your legs and feet we would go ski. Maybe a few runs on a slightly less steep, more comfortable terrain and really concentrate on extending our legs at the top of the turn with the purpose of creating that first part of the boot arc..(the part behind you) In order to do this you will need to extend forward and down the hill and steer your feet through the top of the turn to create that arc..You are trying to get the feeling that the ski is "arcing" through the snow just like the boot was "scribing and arc" through the snow in our boot arcs exercise. As the skis come around and down through the fall line, then across the hill continue to steer the feet through the turn.. At this point shift your balance to the opposite foot and repeat for the other direction. 

 

As you get more and more comfortable with this, Then slowly take it steeper and steeper. You should find that your speed won't get so out of control as you will be starting to actually shape the turn and control the speed at the top of the turn instead of all at the bottom of the turn. If you are standing taller (using the same feel from our boot arc exercise) you will find the legs are way less tired as well as you will have better control of how much or how little to steer the feet and the turns should be rounder and much more fun...

 

DC

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I think dchan made some pretty accurate observations.  I will probably stay out of this one as we actually skied together, if you want a lesson from me you might need to book one.  You are a good skier, but your dad is better and doesn't work as hard.  You should probably continue taking lessons from him.  

 

Old Guys Rule! cool.gif

 

hahaha now I can't mess around with him and tell him he sucks at skiing cause you said that to him he always brings it up

 

I still tell him he sucks anyways and pretend that was never said haha

 

I would actually really like it if you analyzed my skiing since you got to see me in person.  The more advice I can get the better I think.

 

Can't believe the snow you guys have been getting since i was there, just my luck haha

 

Thanks again for showing us a good time.  Hope all is well.

 

dchan:  again really appreciate your help here.  I think I'll be going skiing for a day next sunday so I'll see if I can do this with my dad real quick to get a feeling for what you're talking about.  But like I said I only get to ski a few days a year and do my best to improve my skiing through actually skiing and thinking about little things I've picked up here.

 

I don't know if it's possible but could you maybe give me certain things to think about trying to do while I'm skiing?  As an real easy example, next week I will be thinking about standing taller and trying to have my hips more over my feet (pulling my feet back).  So if you could give me some advice in that way, that would be great for me.

 

Thanks again

post #13 of 19

Ironically, the aft stance at transition is appropriate for absorbing pressure but it is also responsible for the excessive pressure in the last half of the turns. I know this sounds a bit like a chicken and egg thing but hopefully we can all help you understand how these two outcomes are related. The move that projects the core upward (your habitual release move) facilitates what is commonly called a rotary push off transition but additionally allows Gravity to pull the core down the fall line since you are airborne for part of that new turn. Additionally, the strong pivot briefly allows you to get the core back over the skis but that occurs when you are in the air and as you re-establish edge purchase and flex to maintain that purchase, you drop your core aft again. It's like you are doing small leap, pivot and lands on a staircase. Not a bad tactic if you are in a very steep and narrow chute (Tower 3 chutes, Alta Chutes, etc.) but everything you filmed seems to be on much wider terrain.

 

Maybe another tactic in your quiver would take some of the excessive pressure out of the last part of your turns. Accomplishing this it would require you to change where you direct your core and increase the range of motion in your legs. This would keep the skis on the snow more and thus facilitate working them more through the top half of your turns. Obviously, this will feel wierd at first but with practice I am confident you will find the swoopy feeling and the decreased need to flex to avoid shearing the snow (and overwhelming your edge paltform) a lot of fun.

 

 Kneale suggested skiing taller and I agree but where you get taller needs clarification, simply staying taller and continuing to do the Rotary Push Off release move would only produce a taller version of your current skiing with a weaker upward release. So let's get down to specifics and how to change where you project your core and where you should get taller.

 

1. Instead of checking to pop off the edge and push your core upward (go airborne), flatten the skis to the snow enough for the release to occur. Bob Barnes uses a side slip to pivot slip progression to introduce this type of release. This includes a variety of stances and ski to ski relationships. I think it is very important to experience what it takes to release the skis when they are in a wedge, parallel and diverging relationships. Releasing your core towards the middle of the next turn is a common phrase used to describe this sort of release.

2. After the release, allowing the torso to topple into the new turn gets it moving downhill but when you allow it to move too directly down the hill it limits how much pressure you can apply to the skis prior to the fall line. Pick a spot across the hill and move your torso and more specifically your belly button towards that spot. Let the legs extend to maintain contact with the snow but avoid trying to drive the skis strongly into the snow. Think about where you are setting yourself up to strongly pressure the skis. I use the analogy of two basketball players passing the ball back and forth as they run down the court. Done well they do not need to dribble the ball as they pass it quickly back to their partner. In this analogy the core is the ball and our legs are the players catching and releasing the ball. At contact their arms flex to absorb the ball's current momentum, then they extend their arms to re-direct the ball and impart momentum (in the ball) towards their partner.

3. Through the last third of the turn absorbing to keep the skis tracking still occurs but since the torso is now moving more across the hill, the huge momentum arresting Flexion and the big edge checking move are now not necessary. At the most dynamic extreme this is when you will feel the most float as the skis rocket towards the start of the next strong shaping phase.

4. Steep slopes tend to shift our mindset towards defense and the check, pop and rotate sort of transition represents exactly this sort of defensive thinking. By stubbornly hanging onto the diagonal projection of the core and strong shaping efforts around the fall line, you can avoid the habitual rotary push off release that includes allowing your core to fall too directly down the fall line.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post

 

 

Now using some of these new feelings in your legs and feet we would go ski. Maybe a few runs on a slightly less steep, more comfortable terrain and really concentrate on extending our legs Think about unfolding your hip and knees moving the torso down the hill towards the apex of the turn.  at the top of the turn with the purpose of creating that first part of the boot arc..(the part behind you) In order to do this you will need to extend forward and down the hill and steer your feet through the top of the turn to create that arc..You are trying to get the feeling that the ski is "arcing" through the snow just like the boot was "scribing and arc" through the snow in our boot arcs exercise. As the skis come around and down through the fall line, then across the hill continue to steer the feet through the turn.. At this point shift your balance to the opposite foot and repeat for the other direction. 

 

As you get more and more comfortable with this, Then slowly take it steeper and steeper. You should find that your speed won't get so out of control as you will be starting to actually shape the turn and control the speed at the top of the turn instead of all at the bottom of the turn. If you are standing taller (using the same feel from our boot arc exercise) you will find the legs are way less tired as well as you will have better control of how much or how little to steer the feet and the turns should be rounder and much more fun...

 

DC

I highlighted the part that I think will most benefit what you are asking.

 

No need to wait until you get on the hill to get this standing taller and turning your legs under your hips. 

 

Get a couple of pieces of paper or cardboard and 2 chairs or something to hold on to on each side. Stand on the two pieces of paper or cardboard (one under each foot) about shoulder width apart. brace your hands against the two chairs, flex your ankles, knees and hips to about where you see them in that video and then try to turn your two feet under yourself. You are trying to turn the pieces of paper in place like they were turntables.

 

Then stand up taller, hips over the fronts of your arches and do the same movement.. Now remove the paper sheets and do it again. you will feel how much easier it is to pivot the feet under the hips with the taller stance. Then put your boots on. Do the same exercise on carpet. More reinforcement of this feeling. If you have a place where you can do the boot arcs without getting a parent or landlord upset with you, you can do the boot arcs on carpet as well. Since it works better on a slope to get you leaning down the hill if you can find a slight slope even better. Don't grind your boots on pavement or dirt though. It's not worth it. When you are ready to go out and ski, try to beat your skiing partners out to the snow so you can practice the boot arc in the snow while you wait for them. Then take those feelings into "arcs" at the top of each turn..

post #15 of 19
Stand up in your ski boots, rock forward and back gently and feel the pressures on the bottoms of your feet move with your movements. Then make the oscillations smaller and smaller until you can feel equal pressure along the whole bottom of each foot. From there gently flex your ankles so your shins contact the front of the boot cuff and you can still feel the whole bottom of each foot. Now gently rock your feet side to side, feeling for the "edges" of your feet. Establish familiarity with the arches of your feet in the inside corners of the boots and with the areas behind your little toes. Notice that as you move toward one set of "edges", your contact between your shins and your boot cuffs also rolls slightly toward that side.

On skis on gentle terrain, replicate these moves. From traverses, gently roll your feet off their uphill edges toward the bottoms. FEEL the bottoms of both feet. You'll be releasing the edges and if your still standing with the same flexed ankles and open knee joints, the skis will turn toward downhill and you can continue the rolling of the feet onto the new edges. This requires patience. Patience is a big part of eliminating the Zs in your turns, regardless of the steepness. While completing turns on the new edges, make certain the feet turn farther than the torso so that you end up with the belly button aiming toward the apex of the next turn. As the rolling OF BOTH FEET becomes more comfortable, add a gentle extension of both legs by opening the knee joints farther, moving yourself both forward along the skis and toward the apex of the new turn.You cannot make ten turns like this on shallow terrain and then repeat it on steep terrain. You have to make hundreds and hundreds of turns like this where there is no intimidation before it starts to become a comfortable move you can take to gradually steeper slopes.

I like JASP's "unfold" idea. Think of taking the creases out of the back of your outside pantsleg (behind the knee) and out of your parka as you move into the new turn. Think about pressing the front of the inside ski onto its outside edge as you're tipping both feet into the turn
post #16 of 19

Actually, maintaining the RoM but changing where and how strongly we extend, or flex is what I was trying to express. Instead of the stacatto up move at the transition, progressively extending from the transition to the fall line still requires moving through a pretty wide RoM. From there flexing from the fall line through the end of the turn still requires us to flex through a pretty wide RoM. A taller overall stance would not change these requirements. At least not in dynamic turns on steep terrain. What this means is the point where we begin extending changes slightly but what really changes is the direction we extend our legs. It's more lateral and towards the trees on the side of the run. When combined with projecting the core diagonally down the hill (instead of directly down the fall line), it is possible to pressure the skis when they are near the fall line. From there flexing to maintain edge purchase as the ski turn back across the hill does not occur so much in the vertical plane as the lateral plane. Thus allowing us to get the skis back under the body where releasing the edges by reducing edge angles is possible. 

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

So we just got some snow and looks like I'll be hitting the slopes tomorrow.

 

I'm going to focus on not crouching so much.  Going to be thinking about getting my hips over my feet more.

 

What should I be thinking about in terms of initiating my turns?

 

Should I be thinking about opening my ankles at the top and closing them towards the bottom?

 

What other physical movements should I have in mind tomorrow?

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Ironically, the aft stance at transition is appropriate for absorbing pressure but it is also responsible for the excessive pressure in the last half of the turns. I know this sounds a bit like a chicken and egg thing but hopefully we can all help you understand how these two outcomes are related. The move that projects the core upward (your habitual release move) facilitates what is commonly called a rotary push off transition but additionally allows Gravity to pull the core down the fall line since you are airborne for part of that new turn. Additionally, the strong pivot briefly allows you to get the core back over the skis but that occurs when you are in the air and as you re-establish edge purchase and flex to maintain that purchase, you drop your core aft again. It's like you are doing small leap, pivot and lands on a staircase. Not a bad tactic if you are in a very steep and narrow chute (Tower 3 chutes, Alta Chutes, etc.) but everything you filmed seems to be on much wider terrain.

 

Maybe another tactic in your quiver would take some of the excessive pressure out of the last part of your turns. Accomplishing this it would require you to change where you direct your core and increase the range of motion in your legs. This would keep the skis on the snow more and thus facilitate working them more through the top half of your turns. Obviously, this will feel wierd at first but with practice I am confident you will find the swoopy feeling and the decreased need to flex to avoid shearing the snow (and overwhelming your edge paltform) a lot of fun.

 

 Kneale suggested skiing taller and I agree but where you get taller needs clarification, simply staying taller and continuing to do the Rotary Push Off release move would only produce a taller version of your current skiing with a weaker upward release. So let's get down to specifics and how to change where you project your core and where you should get taller.

 

1. Instead of checking to pop off the edge and push your core upward (go airborne), flatten the skis to the snow enough for the release to occur. Bob Barnes uses a side slip to pivot slip progression to introduce this type of release. This includes a variety of stances and ski to ski relationships. I think it is very important to experience what it takes to release the skis when they are in a wedge, parallel and diverging relationships. Releasing your core towards the middle of the next turn is a common phrase used to describe this sort of release.

2. After the release, allowing the torso to topple into the new turn gets it moving downhill but when you allow it to move too directly down the hill it limits how much pressure you can apply to the skis prior to the fall line. Pick a spot across the hill and move your torso and more specifically your belly button towards that spot. Let the legs extend to maintain contact with the snow but avoid trying to drive the skis strongly into the snow. Think about where you are setting yourself up to strongly pressure the skis. I use the analogy of two basketball players passing the ball back and forth as they run down the court. Done well they do not need to dribble the ball as they pass it quickly back to their partner. In this analogy the core is the ball and our legs are the players catching and releasing the ball. At contact their arms flex to absorb the ball's current momentum, then they extend their arms to re-direct the ball and impart momentum (in the ball) towards their partner.

3. Through the last third of the turn absorbing to keep the skis tracking still occurs but since the torso is now moving more across the hill, the huge momentum arresting Flexion and the big edge checking move are now not necessary. At the most dynamic extreme this is when you will feel the most float as the skis rocket towards the start of the next strong shaping phase.

4. Steep slopes tend to shift our mindset towards defense and the check, pop and rotate sort of transition represents exactly this sort of defensive thinking. By stubbornly hanging onto the diagonal projection of the core and strong shaping efforts around the fall line, you can avoid the habitual rotary push off release that includes allowing your core to fall too directly down the fall line.

   I really liked this (all), and would only add a touch on the rotary part since you asked about initiation. If you watch yourself you look inside the turn and then the body and finally skis follow, if anything the reverse should be true. JASP is addressing this in #2.

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

So just got back a great day trip.  The mountain just got 14" and it was 45* out all day.

 

The snow was real heavy which made it kinda tough, but still absolutely loved the conditions.

 

At first I was focused on standing tall and pushing my hips over my feet.  But for some reason, I was really uncomfortable with that.

 

I switched to thinking about pulling my feet under me.  There were definitely some hair moments on some of teh tougher terrain but I started getting a feel for it a bit on some of teh flatter stuff and eventually felt more comfortable with it in the moguls and on steeper trails.

 

Definitely felt more stable I guess I would say.  I don't know how to describe it, but I guess I felt like I had a better foundation and wasn't fighting my skis and the conditions and pressure as much.  Obviously this was much easier terrain than anything out west, but just my observations.

 

Definitely something I still have to become more comfortable and confident with, but it was nice to feel a bit of a difference.

 

One thing I wasn't sure how to work on was using the top of my turn more for control.  But I did try to minimize that huge up and down movement I see I was using in my video I posted.

 

What should I focus on for using the top of my turn more?

 

Thanks guy!
 

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