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Those amazing endorphins and the thrill of skiing

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Checking this thread Why do you ski? - I remember when I first went down a bunny hill and how scary it looked.  I remember the first time I skied a chute and how impossible it looked.  I remember..........you get the idea.....

 

The point is, we experience different levels of fear and excitement when we start skiing and we keep looking for something new and exciting. 

Kim Kircher wrote a blog entry that speaks to me, as she often does, and I realize how much happier I am when my endorphins kick in, but I still have enough fear creeping in to keep me from doing something really really crazy.

 

Doing it for the Thrill - Kim Kircher

From her blog

 

 

Quote:
“Sensation-seekers”, according to psychologists, fill their days with thrilling adventures and novel experiences. Their brains seek more sensation, more of a dopamine kick, more of that optimal flow moment than the rest of the population.

 

I think the follow up question to "Why do you ski?" is  "How far will you push it?"

post #2 of 16

Its the only time i feel free much like riding a motorcycle i dont worry about bills, family, job, nothing for those 7hrs im free
 

post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevez33 View Post

Its the only time i feel free much like riding a motorcycle i dont worry about bills, family, job, nothing for those 7hrs im free
 

This. Absolutely.

 

 

 

Also, other times in life/the real world, we're told what we can and can't do.

 

On the mountain, many of us look at something we've never tried and may initially think "I can't do that". Then we realize maybe we can. Then we do it. Then we turnaround and look back up the "impossible" slope we just did, and it's the best feeling in the world.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevez33 View Post

Its the only time i feel free much like riding a motorcycle i dont worry about bills, family, job, nothing for those 7hrs im free
 

So true...

 

Skiing, MTN Biking, Motocross, Cruising around on my old GSXR 750.

 

Its all about that moment, and your Brain is so caught up in it. Skiing in Steep and Deep conditions is by far the best feeling in the world. For me atleast. Run after Run after run. All day long, All Season. 

 

Some people are really missing out on this great sport. 

post #5 of 16

Yes! Spot on with all accounts. You guys "get it." Too bad so many of our friends and family don't. Oh well...I suppose that means more untracked pow for us. Hehe.

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

Yes! Spot on with all accounts. You guys "get it." Too bad so many of our friends and family don't. Oh well...I suppose that means more untracked pow for us. Hehe.

True That.

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

When I lived in Michigan, I recall looking into this bowl from the top and thinking....."I'll NEVER do THAT!"

 

Now I seek out things that are steeper, more challenging, and (need I say it?) much longer than that 5 turn mogul run in Michigan. 

But Wait!  There's more! eek.gif

This, to me, is more than the kick in the butt from tackling more challenging terrain, although that is certainly a dopamine kick in the butt.   Its about the stoke of finding a stash of powder a few days after a storm.  Its about skiing powder in general.  Its about skiing bell to bell because one more run isn't enough.  Its about sharing this with someone you enjoy spending time with 

 

I am such a lucky girl!

post #8 of 16
If it's really in your blood, the thrill thing works in reverse too. What I mean is even as your skills and strength erode with age completing the icy blue square run is as rewarding as the big brawny bump run used to be in your youth. It's the thrill of the chase, even if you're doing it in 3/4 time.
post #9 of 16

The heck with endorphins--we're talking adrenaline.  First time I skied main chute in Squaw Palisades I used up so much adrenaline that when I skied an intermediate groomer (Shirley Lake) to join up with some folks I could barely make it down. I was literally limp. Piece of cake for a lot of folks of course. 

post #10 of 16

I love coming down off the adrenaline/endorphins on the way home from the mountain.  I never feel more zen and at peace with myself and the world than I do on those drives.

post #11 of 16

We had our beer league final race today. Skiing all out and going for it on an icy rutted course of 1 minute plus really gets you going, especially when you beat your friend and rival by .02 of a second for first place in the age group. In Upstate NY this is our gnar...............and I'm still smiling. (maybe it's the post race beer!)

post #12 of 16

Quote:

Originally Posted by core2 View Post

I love coming down off the adrenaline/endorphins on the way home from the mountain.  I never feel more zen and at peace with myself and the world than I do on those drives.


I agree. For some reason I really really enjoy the car ride both ways. Cant count the times I asked someone else to drive, not because I was tired but because I was so zoned out.  It's like I need a couple hours to mentally get over the day of skiing. Crazyness.

post #13 of 16

I like the term "Sensation Seeker". For me it's always been about calculated risk. Never saw myself as a big risk-taker or thrill seeker, but other people may have viewed me as one. I felt that I trained hard and prepared so I really wasn't taking risks. I wasn't very impulsive at all.

 

My endorphin flow isn't related to speed. I started out as a racer, and did fairly well. But I was more for precision--that's probably why I turned to freestyle (ballet, mogul, aerials.)

 

I think I'm always looking for the perfect run. In ballet, you wanted that perfect axle or perfect pole flip. In moguls, you wanted that perfect line and wanted to ride that fine line being on the edge of control. I really wasn't into aerials and gave that part up--big air wasn't a risk I wanted to take, most likely because I didn't have the chance to train for it very much.

 

When I wasn't training, I actually still headed more for the bumps than the powder. It was about precision. I have to laugh when I think about how much powder I didn't ski in Utah. When I came out west I stunk skiing powder since I spent 15 years skiing on my edges on blue ice!

 

Now, 20+ years later. All the skills aren't there, but there is still that elusive perfectly carved turn where you get into a rhythm that makes it almost effortless. Getting on shaped skis for the first time (after skiing slalom skis all my life) was really fun to get the mechanics down and let the skis rebound and work with gravity.

 

Next, I'll start searching for tha perfect powder run and that will keep the endorphins flowing. icon14.gif

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

When I lived in Michigan, I recall looking into this bowl from the top and thinking....."I'll NEVER do THAT!"

 

 

 

     Crystal Mt. MI?

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 

Yup!

post #16 of 16

This was my thrill today:

Had a run with my daughter today, just a quick little burst down a small steep section of trail with bumps. She led the way and as we got into it, I on her tails each turn I could feel this was a great run happening. The flow and rhythm see she was getting was contagious.We both got to the bottom and knew she had nailed it. She told me she was looking further and further ahead and seeing the line she wanted and it was a mix of long and short turns through the bumps, not a bobble at all. To see it being done right in front of me and feel it as I skied the exact line inches from her felt like perfection. I've skied a lot of trails/lines over the years some have been memorable but only a rare few will stick out forever. This was one of them. Thanks for the run Caitlin.

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