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skid turns feet together? - Page 3

post #61 of 69

No way, that is from behind? Just some humor.
 

post #62 of 69

zentune posted the still regarding the discussion of narrow stance, I was unaware who the skier was and was commenting on what I saw without bias towards the person. While I agree that one still shot is difficult and a side shot would be helpful, I still feel the skier in that photo has a functional stance and that he also has much pressure on the inside ski, I wouldn't post photos and not expect feedback, that is like asking a drunk to put down the beer, (humor).

And in my humble opinion white pass turns reinforce inclination and inside ski bias, that was not my intent in the outside ski drill.

Now away I go,

 

Cheers

 

Barry

post #63 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

I didn't write 'anyone can ski on the downhill ski', that was Marcojp, apologies If I have come off as unfriendly. I would heartily agree with you re. weighting the downhill ski, but white pass turns are an excellent exercise for getting the CoM into the turn. But anyhow, zentune didn't ask for MA, and it's quite hard to see too much from one still, so probably best to leave it.

 

Exactly to all of the above,Jim. The whole 'anyone can ski on their downhill ski' was facetious. You must have overlooked the emoticons, Marooned.

post #64 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marooned View Post

zentune posted the still regarding the discussion of narrow stance, I was unaware who the skier was and was commenting on what I saw without bias towards the person. While I agree that one still shot is difficult and a side shot would be helpful, I still feel the skier in that photo has a functional stance and that he also has much pressure on the inside ski, I wouldn't post photos and not expect feedback, that is like asking a drunk to put down the beer, (humor).

And in my humble opinion white pass turns reinforce inclination and inside ski bias, that was not my intent in the outside ski drill.

Now away I go,

 

Cheers

 

Barry

 

 

We'll agree to vehemently disagree over the value of white pass turns, and that's absolutely fine with me as it's a big world with many means of achieving our 'desired outcome.'

post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marooned View Post

And in my humble opinion white pass turns reinforce inclination and inside ski bias,

This is absolutely true ... when the drill is done incorrectly.

post #66 of 69

If balance is accurate, turns made entirely on the outside ski or on the inside ski will look nearly identical. There will be some small differences necessary to keep one ski or the other slightly off the ground, but turns made on the inside ski should not require exaggerated inclination to initiate. If you're good at it, you should be able to leave one ski in the rack, and only people who can actually see your feet will be able to tell.

 

 

So, if you think it's difficult moving from the little toe edge to the big toe edge of your uphill ski to initiate, consider moving from the big toe edge to the little toe edge of your downhill ski. Either can and should be accomplished by tipping the skis, not the whole body.

 

 

Accuracy in a well done white pass turn means you can ski well on either foot, or both feet, as required by intent and conditions.

 

None of this means that you ski with your feet and knees nailed together, with the possible exception of competitive bumping. Even the pivot slip, the total skid, requires functional separation.

post #67 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

If balance is accurate, turns made entirely on the outside ski or on the inside ski will look nearly identical. There will be some small differences necessary to keep one ski or the other slightly off the ground, but turns made on the inside ski should not require exaggerated inclination to initiate. If you're good at it, you should be able to leave one ski in the rack, and only people who can actually see your feet will be able to tell.

 

 

So, if you think it's difficult moving from the little toe edge to the big toe edge of your uphill ski to initiate, consider moving from the big toe edge to the little toe edge of your downhill ski. Either can and should be accomplished by tipping the skis, not the whole body.

 

 

Accuracy in a well done white pass turn means you can ski well on either foot, or both feet, as required by intent and conditions.

 

 

 

^^^^ that! ^^^^

post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

If balance is accurate, turns made entirely on the outside ski or on the inside ski will look nearly identical. There will be some small differences necessary to keep one ski or the other slightly off the ground, but turns made on the inside ski should not require exaggerated inclination to initiate. If you're good at it, you should be able to leave one ski in the rack, and only people who can actually see your feet will be able to tell.

 

 

So, if you think it's difficult moving from the little toe edge to the big toe edge of your uphill ski to initiate, consider moving from the big toe edge to the little toe edge of your downhill ski. Either can and should be accomplished by tipping the skis, not the whole body.

 

 

Accuracy in a well done white pass turn means you can ski well on either foot, or both feet, as required by intent and conditions.

 

None of this means that you ski with your feet and knees nailed together, with the possible exception of competitive bumping. Even the pivot slip, the total skid, requires functional separation.


Total agreement.

post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marooned View Post

And in my humble opinion white pass turns reinforce inclination and inside ski bias,

This is absolutely true ... when the drill is done incorrectly.


And I have resembled this remark thank you.

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