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Trace the nose of the snowboard with your knee!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Recently I have heard this repeatedly. It has been years since I last heard it. I would like to hear opinions on this turn tactic. Personally I find it painful. Ouch!

post #2 of 7

You've heard this many times recently, but not for years? Haha. I've never heard it. I've heard a similar tip, to imagine your knees box and to move them towards the front corners to turn.  I think both of these tips may help keep weight forward, but I don't know why you would want to move your knees in an arc rather than laterally.

post #3 of 7

Funny you mentioned this. I used this drill in a clinic last Sunday. It's never done much for me personally. But it worked a miracle for the lady I gave it to in the clinic. It all depends on where you're at and where you need to go. In the case of my recent victim, she needed to flex her front leg more and move her weight forward more. You can't do this drill with a long and stiff front leg. Timing is important. If you do this move during turn initiation, you spin a flat board  to get the turn started quicker. If you do it in the bottom part of the turn, you can feel the board torque and tighten the turn finish (sensing feedback from the movement is more important here than the effect on turn shape). If you do the movement smoothly throughout the entire turn, you'll either get good results or not really tell the difference at all. It all depends on where you're at and where you need to go.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Rusty, do you use this just as a drill?... or do you (in your victim(s)) advocate it as a way to continue to move during their daily riding?

telerod, I agree with you on "why move them in an arc"? It seems to move the knee sideways (not a hinge joint move).

post #5 of 7

Bryan,

 

I've never done follow up on a victim, but my guess is that this just ends up almost like a "swing thought" in golf. For some people the drill will become how they ride. For some people it's something they think about it until the move is incorporated into their muscle memory. For most people the move gets boiled down to it's essential elements as it gets incorporated into muscle memory and becomes a tool in the tool box as opposed to something done on every turn.

 

Although the knee does not move laterally, if you bend your knees you can move your ankles to shift the lateral position of the knee relative to the feet and this will encourage movement of the center of mass. Personally, if someone told me to do this move through ankle movement, it would never happen. But I can think about either moving my knee or shifting my hip and get the desired result. As instructors we need to find the words that trigger the desired movement. If "Spread peanut butter with your little toe" worked, I'd use it.

 

Tracing the nose also encourages smooth synchronization of weight shift with edge change. A risk here is that upper body rotation is also induced. It's just one of the things we have to watch and adapt to. Some drills "click" with some students. Some students need minor adjustments to get the full effect of the drill. Some students need a different drill. Your Movements May Vary

post #6 of 7

Is there a video for this technique?  Because... I never learned that technique...when I was learning and taking lessons

post #7 of 7

Unless the you are an instructor or the video was done professionally it would be very hard to see this on video. The visible movement of the knee is very subtle and easily lost among other movements that "thinking about tracing the nose of the board" causes. Ideally you would want to see a split screen with one side showing the rider in specific portions of the turn and the other side showing a top down view of the front leg so you could see the knee position relative to the front foot and then show a slow motion clip that has overlays indicating where all of the different movements are happening. It's far easier to just do it. It's one of those things that either works for you or not. It's hard to do the move "wrong".

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