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How careful are you of your skis/bases/edges - Page 2

post #31 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post

As I mentioned to a friend of mine Saturday, skis are a consumable item.

With that said, it seemed terribly unfair that we both hit rocks that were mixed in with groomed snow on a particular run. nonono2.gif

Been there.. But, it's part of skiing. In fact, I think most of my dings are from that because I am not taking the time to evaluate
post #32 of 61
Sibhusky, I hear you. That people consider $500 - $1000 pieces of equipment as consumables is beyond my wallet as well. The skis I beat on cost anywhere from $15.00 to $300.00 with bindings. I don't get rid of many skis so the older they are, the more beat and thus the more likely they are to come out early season off-piste.

I've take a tumble or two from the conditions. My rule is never to ski faster than I'm willing to hit something. When I know that something could be a tree or a rock, I ski less fast; I can't say I ski slowly except in the most obvious and blatantly poor conditions.
post #33 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess, being poor, skis are not that consumable to me, they are an investment. However, the much bigger issue is that hidden rocks and stumps are not just a danger to the skis, but also to YOU. I speak from experience. So, taking the time to evaluate terrain and snow coverage, other tracks, iffy lumps, etc., can be well worth the savings on medical bills.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post

Sibhusky, I hear you. That people consider $500 - $1000 pieces of equipment as consumables is beyond my wallet as well. The skis I beat on cost anywhere from $15.00 to $300.00 with bindings. I don't get rid of many skis so the older they are, the more beat and thus the more likely they are to come out early season off-piste.

I've take a tumble or two from the conditions. My rule is never to ski faster than I'm willing to hit something. When I know that something could be a tree or a rock, I ski less fast; I can't say I ski slowly except in the most obvious and blatantly poor conditions.

I guess I need to explain what I meant by consumable.

 

By consumable I meant that skis, like anything else, wears out-gets used up over time. Part of the process is one dings up the base, scratches the topsheet and so on. They get consumed over time.

post #34 of 61

I think anything said here can be said about someone's car, and even more so.

 

In another car forum, someone brought up a very apt metaphor that people "go gollum" about "their precioussss" and baby the car and freak out on the most minor dings.

 

Whereas not only is a car (or skis) replaceable/interchangeable with money;  but the monetary value is well established by an open market that has a fair amount of volume.  In the case of cars, insurance adjusters will calculate for you exactly what your car is worth in dollars, with no extra value for your emotional attachment to it.

post #35 of 61
I guess for the westerners edge condition doesn't matter that much, but for easterners we need a sharp edge since we see fresh soft snow maybe a few times a years, especially this winter with the multiple freeze/thaw cycles.

Especially for budget skiers who need their skis to last a few years before replacing.
post #36 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess, being poor, skis are not that consumable to me, they are an investment. However, the much bigger issue is that hidden rocks and stumps are not just a danger to the skis, but also to YOU. I speak from experience. So, taking the time to evaluate terrain and snow coverage, other tracks, iffy lumps, etc., can be well worth the savings on medical bills.

I don't view them as a consumable but at the same time I've come to accept that if I want to ski tight chutes or hit rock drops I'm going to damage my skis. That being said I agree with the second part. I learned that lesson the hard way a couple years ago. Had a hidden rock rip off a ski and slid for 400-500 vert. Luckily it was an open slope and I was uninjured but it certainly scared me. 

post #37 of 61

Well, you are lucky.  And eventually, your number will come up.  I skied for 35 years before a serious injury, caused by a hidden...rock?  stump?  Who knows?  Cost $60,000.

post #38 of 61

Unless they are true race skis, typical gouges and edge dings don't really matter that much anywhere except on really hard, and icy terrain.  That said, it is still worthwhile to give all skis a little TLC, p-tex, and filing along with the occasional base grinds.  I get a lot of personal satisfaction out of cleaning up my bases and tuning the edges before waxing.  However, except on ice, the small to medium gouges really don't matter much performance wise. 

 

And, yes, when on older skis I take more chances heading down trails where coverage may not be that great.  When I'm on my carving skis I avoid the thin looking areas.

post #39 of 61

I take pride in what I do. You make it sound like I am just phoning it in. I will use your analogy. How many chefs spend 8 hours in the kitchen at work then run home to spend another two hours in their own kitchen? Don't make me sound like I don't care. I put in hours of over time fixing and perfecting skis that are in great shape just because people think that one branch they skied over is going to drastically change the way the ski will run. Get over it.    

post #40 of 61

I usually try not to abuse my equipment.

 

That said sometimes its unavoidable to get to where you wanna go

 

I just watch out on traversing across areas where coverage is thin.

 

That said, my skis have some large ptex repairs from last years antics in Tahoe

 

Or as King Grump mentioned to me one day

 

Quote:
This year all my ski's are rock ski's
post #41 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro View Post

Hi everybody.  Bit of a philosophical question for you:

How do you balance going out and charging, even on some questionable terrain where the coverage might be thin (in the trees, dropping cliffs, etc), with taking care of your skis?

 

Here's my situation:  I skied Magic Mountain, VT today for the first time ever, and on a brand new pair of Kendos.  I guess I didn't really know what I was getting into: rocks masquerading as moguls, paper-thin snow coverage on many open trails, stumps, sticks, pipes, etc.  I just looked at my edges, and found that they were really eaten up - no surprise. ...


...So what do I do?  Dial it back on days like today in an effort to keep my equipment in better shape for firmer (and less fun) conditions?  Or get while the getting is good, sharp edges be damned?

 

Glad to see nothing much has changed at Magic in over 35 yrs...

 

as mentioned before - Magic Mtn and a few others is why rock skis exist.

NEVER take good skis to Magic. back in the day, 4 yr old Zebras used to make a very distinctive sound when you ran over snow-making pipe... I think it was the cracked edge...

rock skis were always best when they were long cause then you could get that 'zzziiiippp' sound from the P-Tex as you strafed across a rock at speed.

never dial it back

never give up, never surrender

post #42 of 61

I do tend to be more careful on my race skis, staying out of the trees and other sketchy terrain but on my all mountain skis, just about anything goes.  I do seek out tree runs and natural snow areas that might have some base hazzards, but that is the cost of having fun.

 

For the most part, I subscribe to the theory that skis are not an investment to be cherished and protected.  Skis are a consumable that you use up and then buy another pair.

 

Go have fun and don't worry so much about your skis.

 

Rick G

post #43 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess, being poor, skis are not that consumable to me, they are an investment.

 

If you truly believe skis are an investment, then I would hate to see your investment portfolio.  Skis, like cars, depreciate as soon as you carry them out of the store with bindings drilled into them.  They will never be worth as much as you paid for them.  So since they will not appreciate over time, you may as well appreciate them on the snow and have some fun.

 

Rick G

post #44 of 61

For some people, tearing the edge out of their only pair of skis they recently spent $500+ on isn't "having fun".  Investing $100.00 in an additional pair of skis you can use with a lower level of stress on not so great days or not so great trails should always be an option though.  You can have both, the prized possession kit gloves skis and the beaters for the don't give a flip situations.

post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nitro View Post

.....get while the getting is good, sharp edges be damned!

Didn't read the whole thread and I know I'm only echoing sentiments that have already been expressed..... but I changed the punctuation in your quote to better suit my feelings on the issue.

 

Also, it is so, so easy to buy top of the line skis really cheap.  So save a pair for firm and firmer days and go have some real fun on whatever else ya got.

post #46 of 61

Could never wrap my head around the term Rock Skis. Couldn't afford two sets early on.

 

So I work hard not to hit the rocks and traps which damage skis not matter the conditions and when there is no alternative, ski lightly, very lightly.  It does make for a workout and some interesting skiing and body contortions.

 

To date I haven't done and major damage to either bases or edges in conditions I was sure I would get a core shot or two, not to mention the edge damage.

 

Knock on wood.

post #47 of 61
Some days, you just have to go get a set from the rental shack.
post #48 of 61

Boy, am I lucky!  Rocks are rarely a problem where I ski.  I have one repair on a pair of skis that is about 4 years old and that's all of the rocks I've hit on my current skis.  It helps to have as much snow coverage as we do here.  One of these days though...

post #49 of 61

I don't really have a "rock ski" or any desire to take my skis in a thin rocky terrain. I usually wait until later in the season to venture off piste. There has to be snow in order to enjoy skiing. I never understood how some people go and ski snow dusted rocks after first snowfall....

post #50 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I guess, being poor, skis are not that consumable to me, they are an investment. However, the much bigger issue is that hidden rocks and stumps are not just a danger to the skis, but also to YOU. I speak from experience. So, taking the time to evaluate terrain and snow coverage, other tracks, iffy lumps, etc., can be well worth the savings on medical bills.

 

Yeah, that's scary. We had great snow at MLB last weekend, and going up the Headwaters lift I saw a guy bombing down the mountain and hit rocks under the deceivingly good-looking snow. He bit it pretty hard and had about 3 people rush over to help him. I think he ended up ok, but that had to hurt bad. I ended up traversing over to one of the lower chutes and after seeing that guy, I decided to sloooowly enter the chute. Thank goodness, as I ended up having to walk my skis over sheer rocks that were under about a foot of super fluffy pow. The chute skied great once I was in it, but my wife's and my skis were pretty much destroyed. frown.gif Oh well, I guess some skis must be sacrificed for the best terrain. Was totally worth it tho.

post #51 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

For some people, tearing the edge out of their only pair of skis they recently spent $500+ on isn't "having fun".  Investing $100.00 in an additional pair of skis you can use with a lower level of stress on not so great days or not so great trails should always be an option though.  You can have both, the prized possession kit gloves skis and the beaters for the don't give a flip situations.

 

If a ski is good enough to instill confidence on sketchy terrain and the edges are intact, I'm always going to give a flip.

post #52 of 61

I was pretty adamant that my edges and bases stayed in pristine condition on my new skis this year. That train of thought bit the dust pretty quick though, way more fun to ski hard all day and worry about the damage as it happens. Still haven't had any major, performance impeding damage yet though, and at 108 underfoot they were never a hard snow ski to begin with.

 

The Pursuit's will be a different story though...

post #53 of 61

The hardest part is over. Those first couple of scratches on that brand new pair of skis that you spent weeks researching are the most painful. Once they're there, your skis are no longer plastic-perfect, so go get after it in whatever terrain you want. 

 

Usually, I don't worry about it in the early season because there are exposed rocks all over. Then when the snow base fills in, I get a good tune. This year, though, the base never filled in and there are rocks, weeds and such everywhere. My board is torn to crap, but it's a lot more fun just riding everything I like to ride than sitting in the lodge staring at a pristine base. 

 

Sibhusky makes a good point, though, hidden rocks and such are more of a worry for your health. 

post #54 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I think anything said here can be said about someone's car, and even more so.

 

In another car forum, someone brought up a very apt metaphor that people "go gollum" about "their precioussss" and baby the car and freak out on the most minor dings.

 

Whereas not only is a car (or skis) replaceable/interchangeable with money;  but the monetary value is well established by an open market that has a fair amount of volume.  In the case of cars, insurance adjusters will calculate for you exactly what your car is worth in dollars, with no extra value for your emotional attachment to it.

Cars are a bit different than skis thanks to the fact that the chassis/powertrain/running gear doing the actual driving are separate from the aesthetic body people baby. Dings and such aren't an inherent part of driving whereas they are in skiing. It's perfectly possible to own a beautiful sports car, drive it to its limits on a regular basis and still have a show-floor worthy piece when you're done. 

post #55 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

Cars are a bit different than skis thanks to the fact that the chassis/powertrain/running gear doing the actual driving are separate from the aesthetic body people baby. Dings and such aren't an inherent part of driving whereas they are in skiing. It's perfectly possible to own a beautiful sports car, drive it to its limits on a regular basis and still have a show-floor worthy piece when you're done. 

Rock chips, and scrapes on things affect cars too.  

I've had a friend who would not drive his somewhat low car to san francisco just because he didn't want to scrape on potential steep hills/driveways.  Or certain drivers who bought a sports car but never ever run their engine past half throttle (due to fear of damaging their engine, not because of fear of control issues).  It's common knowledge that people drive the heck out of rental cars but they don't do the same on their own cars.  Even though with proper maintenance driving a car hard should cause no permanent wear.

 

But, even throwing out the debate about cosmetic dmg and functional dmg, I think the same psychology shows up in people regardless of the type of damage.

Go over to the tuning/maintenance area and all the first-time ski owners that are panicking over topsheet or cosmetic base dmg, so I'm just saying you see the same behavior as with car owners. 

post #56 of 61

I buy a pair of used skis, beat the crap out of them, slap some rub on wax on after every trip. Then I buy another pair of used skis the next season and do the same thing. biggrin.gif

post #57 of 61

God invented ptex to deal with these problems.

 

If you're not going to use them, just stay home.

post #58 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

God invented ptex to deal with these problems.

 

If you're not going to use them, just stay home.

 

 

Ptex doesn't fix a blown edge.  Having already trashed a pair of skis in this way, that is my one fear.

post #59 of 61

Those going to Big Sky for the gathering will gain a new perspective on what you can do to a pair of skis in a day.

post #60 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post

 

If a ski is good enough to instill confidence on sketchy terrain and the edges are intact, I'm always going to give a flip.


Maybe so, but I NEVER pay current year full price skis simply because knowledge that I'm risking $600+ anywhere on the mountain would decrease my fun and joy tremendously.  Even with a pair of 4 year old skis that came still in plastic and cost $90 delivered I wouldn't do anything extremely foolish, but I did lightly hop across the lightly sanded ski house road several times.  If it looks moderately OK I'll go for it.,  But, the more expensive the skis and newer they are is a strong factor in determining "looks moderately OK".  I don't own a pair of skis that cost me more than $250 delivered including bindings.  At the same time, none of them have any core shots..  But, having it happen wouldn't phase me much knowing I've gotten my money's worth out of all of these..  even the ones that have two days on them.

 

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