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Just bought used rental skis, did I do ok?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I've been skiing for 2 years now, at Wachusett in Massachusetts. Always been renting from them and today I asked if they sold what they rent. Turns out they do, and I got skis and boots for $130. The skis are Head Alien, obviously look used but seem to be in ok condition. The boots are also Head, and are marked up quite a bit, but so are the ones I'm always renting.

 

So how did I do? How old are these skis? Good or bad deal/decision?

post #2 of 9

Sorry, You should have gone to a good ski shop and bought good low end boots that fit your feet.

 

BOOTS are the most important part. Even if you throw away the boots and find some good shop in your area, may be ask some of the ski instructors who to buy boots from, you can get some good low end boots for under $300.

 

My boot fitter spent 2 hours fitting my GF for her boots, She's a lower level skier, but he's one of the best fitters in VT, her boots were $250.

 

You need to ask around and find a good boot fitter, the skis will be fine for a short time. Those skis are mainly meant for lower level skiers,

post #3 of 9

I don't believe that everyone needs a boot fitter.  It depends on how well the boots fit your feet to begin with and what your natural stance is like. For example, I bought a great pair of boots last season from an expert boot fitter and he spent no more time with me than it took to try on a couple of different boots.  That said, you will grow out of the basic rental gear fairly quickly but for what you paid I think you did fine.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post

I don't believe that everyone needs a boot fitter.  It depends on how well the boots fit your feet to begin with and what your natural stance is like. For example, I bought a great pair of boots last season from an expert boot fitter and he spent no more time with me than it took to try on a couple of different boots.  That said, you will grow out of the basic rental gear fairly quickly but for what you paid I think you did fine.

Huh? Did he measure your foot for length, width, flexabilty, overall volume etc? If yes, he got you the right boot that fit out of the box, which is part of a proper boot fit even if it didn't take long, If he didn't then you don't really know if you have the optimal boot for your foot.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

What about the skis I got? How old is that model?

 

And how do people typically "out grow" skis and boots? I've been happy with rental skis, and I still manage to go 30MPH...and stay in control, assuming I'm not on ice.
 

post #6 of 9

At $130 i don't know how bad it could be.  Even season long equipment leases usually are around $200.

 

I haven't heard of them, you'll def. outgrow them, but considering rental prices, if they are usuable for even just 4-5days, then you've broken even.   If they are working well for you now, that's all the feedback you need.

 

The biggest potential problem I see, is not looking at money already spent, but being too cautious about avoiding spending future money trying to minimize each ski day's expense.

Don't get overly attached to this equipment, probably within a season, the equipment is what will end up holding you back.  When you reach that stage, it's not that you will have less fun on the slopes, but potentially you could be having more fun if you had better equipment.

 

 

Outgrow means for me that when you improve in skiing, you are able to apply more mechanical force into your ski and you expect the ski to be able to respond to your input accordingly.    You will also be able to make a variety of turns, and do not need the ski design to assist you in making the turns as much.

 

The most obvious factor is ski length.  As a beginner, skis are sized shorter as they are easier to manuever and control, but the tradeoff is length that provides stability and control at higher speeds. The edge of ski is what controls movement, and the edge is the control surface.  More length is more control surface-and manufacturers make use of it.  Otherwise you're a passenger on a ski saucer.

Flex and ski design (sidecut) have similar arguments.

An advanced skier who's skis are more optimized for high speed doesn't need the slow speed ski for couple of reasons, 1) they have the skills to manuever at slow skis.  2) it is not as interesting for them to ski at slower speeds, they've already done plenty of that when they were learning.  Exception maybe for ski school instructors where you see that sometimes they take out a short length  intermediate or beginner ski. 

 

Boots have a similar story.  


Edited by raytseng - 2/23/13 at 5:41pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemesis256 View Post

I've been skiing for 2 years now, at Wachusett in Massachusetts. Always been renting from them and today I asked if they sold what they rent. Turns out they do, and I got skis and boots for $130. The skis are Head Alien, obviously look used but seem to be in ok condition. The boots are also Head, and are marked up quite a bit, but so are the ones I'm always renting.

 

So how did I do? How old are these skis? Good or bad deal/decision?

 

Its hard to get equipment that is yours for less, and from that standpoint, I think it is a great deal.

 

As others have said, you would likely see a world of difference being fit into a set of consumer boots. Rental boots are designed to fit many different foot sizes with (hopefully) minimal foot pain, and generally transmit skiing inputs to the ski like there is a west sponge between the boot and ski.

 

BUT.

 

You own your equipment now, and can now choose to upgrade piecemeal at your leisure. So, next season you can drop some cash out boots, season after skis, etc.  The hardest part about transitioning from renting to owning is how hard it hits your wallet buying everything at once.

 

If the rental boots arn't giving you pain, enjoy them, and think about replacing them down the road.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric S View Post

Huh? Did he measure your foot for length, width, flexabilty, overall volume etc? If yes, he got you the right boot that fit out of the box, which is part of a proper boot fit even if it didn't take long, If he didn't then you don't really know if you have the optimal boot for your foot.

lol.  he held my foot in his hands for a minute then measured it then brought me 2 pairs of boots that he thought might work for me... both fit, but one fit better.  I'm pretty sure he found a boot that is optimal for me.  I've been skiing a long time and believe me, my new boots are not holding me back.

post #9 of 9
For the price you paid they are just fine. Remember that many people here wouldn't blink an eye dropping several hundred for a new pair of boots or skis for their inventory that rivals a small shop, so take the "spend more money" suggestions with grain of salt.
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