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Do they still exist???????

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Back when I joined this forum 13 years ago I had just ordered some fat skis for powder. They were some Salomon Supermountains with a waist a whopping 78mm wide & were about the fattest skis anyone on the forum had. Being one of the first proponents of fatter skis I was often ridiculed & attacked with the usual argument that I didn't need fatter skis, I needed lessons but most often the argument against fatter skis was the poster knew a Colorado ski instructor (usually in Aspen) that skied everything, by choice, on shorty slaloms. So my question is, 13 years later, are their still Colorado ski instructors that ski everything, by choice, on their shorty slaloms?

post #2 of 18

I'm a Whistler skier, and an instructor (though not at Whistler) and I enjoy skiing the entire mountain on 75mm skis. I don't like bumps or more than 6" of powder on my slaloms (my slaloms are too stiff). That said, one instructor friend at Hemlock and one at Whistler, ski the whole mountain in all conditions on their 65mm slalom skis. 

post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

Back when I joined this forum 13 years ago I had just ordered some fat skis for powder. They were some Salomon Supermountains with a waist a whopping 78mm wide & were about the fattest skis anyone on the forum had. Being one of the first proponents of fatter skis I was often ridiculed & attacked with the usual argument that I didn't need fatter skis, I needed lessons but most often the argument against fatter skis was the poster knew a Colorado ski instructor (usually in Aspen) that skied everything, by choice, on shorty slaloms. So my question is, 13 years later, are their still Colorado ski instructors that ski everything, by choice, on their shorty slaloms?


 Probably, but if you cornered one of them to ask, the terribly important question is what they define as "everything" and how much of one of their days off, in what conditions, do they actually ski "everything."

 

A good skier can take pretty much any set of skis down anything inbounds and make it work. What's telling is whether they are lapping the type of terrain that is generally considered appropriate for "shorty slaloms," or the current crop of fat skis.

 

I would say at least 95% of instructors that spend most of their days off piste are skiing fat skis on those off piste days.

 

Its been years and years since I have seen a Colorado ski patroller on anything other than fat skis, which I think says more about the benefits of ski technology than what instructors choose to do with their free time.

post #4 of 18

I don't think that statistics pulled out of your butt help answer the OP's question of if there are still Colorado instructors on shorty slalom skis. 

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I don't think that statistics pulled out of your butt help answer the OP's question of if there are still Colorado instructors on shorty slalom skis. 

you'r right because physical observation is absolutely worthless and never used for anything but arguing on internet forums rolleyes.gif

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

Back when I joined this forum 13 years ago I had just ordered some fat skis for powder. They were some Salomon Supermountains with a waist a whopping 78mm wide & were about the fattest skis anyone on the forum had. Being one of the first proponents of fatter skis I was often ridiculed & attacked with the usual argument that I didn't need fatter skis, I needed lessons but most often the argument against fatter skis was the poster knew a Colorado ski instructor (usually in Aspen) that skied everything, by choice, on shorty slaloms. So my question is, 13 years later, are their still Colorado ski instructors that ski everything, by choice, on their shorty slaloms?

Yes.

 

I've been lectured in the Instruction forum on here quite recently that frontside carvers were the way to go, for everything.  By a Colorado ski instructor.

 

The insularity is fascinating of itself.  Roughly on a par with the wide-stance misinformation you often see on here.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

I'm a Whistler skier, and an instructor (though not at Whistler) and I enjoy skiing the entire mountain on 75mm skis. I don't like bumps or more than 6" of powder on my slaloms (my slaloms are too stiff). That said, one instructor friend at Hemlock and one at Whistler, ski the whole mountain in all conditions on their 65mm slalom skis. 

 

Wow, Whistler on slalom skis, really? Do they ski powder? How and why?

 

Most of the instructors I've seen are on fat skis on snow days. Saw a guy teaching on 193cm Cochise (might have even been Bodacious couldn't tell).

post #8 of 18

bottom line is,,,, no matter how much you love your daily driver 98mm or 88mm (or in my case an 84mm), nothing turns as quick as those darn skinny skis!  :) 

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramboh View Post

 

Wow, Whistler on slalom skis, really? Do they ski powder? How and why?

 

Most of the instructors I've seen are on fat skis on snow days. Saw a guy teaching on 193cm Cochise (might have even been Bodacious couldn't tell).

 

Totally different sensation skiing a narrow ski in powder versus a fat ski. A narrow waist ski keeps you on your game. I actually find a narrower waist ski (72-75mm, but not narrower) fun in new snow, and I do believe it will make you a better all mountain skier as it requires more precise balance and pressure control.

 

My theory is that most skiers feel the fun and ease of use of fat skis outweigh the gains they achieve on narrow-waisted skis. (...and I think most people's experience with narrow waists is limited to garbage rental gear rather than high performance gear.) 

 

I believe skidude said he skis the cochise on new snow days. He's a high level instructor.

post #10 of 18

I had a lesson with a strong skier this morning, he actually asked why I was on my usual teaching skis (175, Fischer WC RCs) as opposed to fat skis. I ski those because I can ski better everywhere on them than I can on my next ski (98mm), probably I would have preferred the bigger skis for that class, as we only skied powder, but with new clients I never know exactly what they want to work on. Freeskiing here I typically ski 195 AK JJs (120mm underfoot), so it's not like I'm against big skis. 

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

Back when I joined this forum 13 years ago I had just ordered some fat skis for powder. They were some Salomon Supermountains with a waist a whopping 78mm wide & were about the fattest skis anyone on the forum had. Being one of the first proponents of fatter skis I was often ridiculed & attacked with the usual argument that I didn't need fatter skis, I needed lessons but most often the argument against fatter skis was the poster knew a Colorado ski instructor (usually in Aspen) that skied everything, by choice, on shorty slaloms. So my question is, 13 years later, are their still Colorado ski instructors that ski everything, by choice, on their shorty slaloms?

Two words for you..Bob Barnes. 

post #12 of 18

The way I look if you follow the true PSIA teachings, you should know how to chose the proper tool for the conditions.

 

I like my 88mm Kendo's and enjoy skiing them everywhere, I will bring out my fat skis for powder day's.

 

Oh, yea, I'm no ski god instructor either. Just ask me...I have a buddy that skis his Mantra's everyday except for powder day's at Okemo. It's all about what you enjoy doing...

 

Oh, yea, I'll admit to the fact that I can remember those Supermountains too.

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

Totally different sensation skiing a narrow ski in powder versus a fat ski. A narrow waist ski keeps you on your game. I actually find a narrower waist ski (72-75mm, but not narrower) fun in new snow, and I do believe it will make you a better all mountain skier as it requires more precise balance and pressure control.

 

My theory is that most skiers feel the fun and ease of use of fat skis outweigh the gains they achieve on narrow-waisted skis. (...and I think most people's experience with narrow waists is limited to garbage rental gear rather than high performance gear.) 

 

I believe skidude said he skis the cochise on new snow days. He's a high level instructor.

 

I grew up racing on straight skis (quit in 97 which was before more pronounced shapes and shorter lengths were used). I remember one particular deep day at Blackcomb on Rossi 9S slalom skis (190ish with a race plate). Sure it was fun, and the sensation is different, but I can't imagine going back to that now. You ski a lot slower and use more energy, but to each their own :).

post #14 of 18

narrow waisted skis aren't the same as straight skis. 

post #15 of 18
Here in Tirol, and notably in the BC touring, you see lots of skinny (<70mm), short skis w tech bindings coming down in multiple feet of powder making perfectly symmetrical tight turns.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

narrow waisted skis aren't the same as straight skis. 

You have skis that measure exactly the same at tip, waist and tail???

Every ski I have ever seen has had a narrower waist...

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ricochet112 View Post

You have skis that measure exactly the same at tip, waist and tail???

Every ski I have ever seen has had a narrower waist...

I think what he means is straight skis vs a narrow shaped ski.  

post #18 of 18

I got a pair of Atomic Theory's and they ski a lot easier than I thought for being 95mm's wide (i've never skied a wide ski).  I saw some reviews on here that they weren't good.  If I wanted a stiff long ski, I'd ski on my volkl 182 six stars, or a racing ski, which is better for groomers.  But you can pretty much do anything on the Atomic Theories, and I like they have some flex, not as good going fast, but an engineering marvel imo.  I'll probably use them every ski day, minus just a couple.  In choppy snow there's no way a narrow ski is good.

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