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Dealing with death

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I apologize in advance if the following upsets some of you.  I mean no disrespect, I just had to get it out of my chest.

 

Two deaths only a few days apart.  RIP.

 

It's hard enough as it is for us patrollers, some people on the social networks blame the ski patrol for not having been able to avoid these tragedies, for not enforcing the rules enough.  I say we can't be everywhere at the same time, and we can't prevent people from colliding with trees, falling, or performing dangerous stunts.  You can make a ski hill reasonably safe, but you will never be able to make it 100% safe.

 

And our warnings are not as effective as they should.  In today's society, a significant minority of skiers and boarders have been ignoring our warnings, dodging ropes, trying crazy stunts, skiing too fast, skiing while intoxicated, drinking beer and smoking drugs in front of the other clients like it was nothing, showing disrespect to the lift operators and to us, because "it's cool".  We see clients shoving and hitting patrollers and lift operators, we have to call the police because of their aggressive behavior.

 

With that mindset that the patrollers are the enemy and that rules are meant to be violated, I expect a lot more deaths in the future.

post #2 of 8

My state offers free PTSD-type counseling in a group setting to groups like patrollers in cases like what you describe.  My patrol took advantage of it a couple years ago after a death at the area.  It was very helpful for dealing with feelings like you've described, I strongly suggest that your patrol look for something like that.  

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

My state offers free PTSD-type counseling in a group setting to groups like patrollers in cases like what you describe.  My patrol took advantage of it a couple years ago after a death at the area.  It was very helpful for dealing with feelings like you've described, I strongly suggest that your patrol look for something like that.  

 

The ski station has been very helpful and is offering free counseling to all of us who have a hard time dealing with the situation.  Several of us have used the service, and it helps a lot.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

My state offers free PTSD-type counseling in a group setting to groups like patrollers in cases like what you describe.  My patrol took advantage of it a couple years ago after a death at the area.  It was very helpful for dealing with feelings like you've described, I strongly suggest that your patrol look for something like that.  

 

The ski station has been very helpful and is offering free counseling to all of us who have a hard time dealing with the situation.  Several of us have used the service, and it helps a lot.

 

Glad to hear that.  beercheer.gif

post #5 of 8
Nevermind, I was thinking of the one in val st. come.

People on the net say all sorts of shit they would never dare to in real life, just ignore them as you would a lunatic on the street telling you world is ending.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo View Post

With that mindset that the patrollers are the enemy and that rules are meant to be violated, I expect a lot more deaths in the future.

 

Condolences to you and your fellow patrollers.  Luckily were I ski, that mind set is in the vast minority.  Patrollers are our mentors, saviors and friends. We suffered the death of a very poplar member this year and it really drew the community together.  Please be aware that you are appreciated by the majority, no matter where you work.   Thank you for your service.

post #7 of 8

I agree.  Patrollers are appreciated and respected and I'm sorry to hear that doesn't feel like the case where you are.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo View Post
.

 

It's hard enough as it is for us patrollers, some people on the social networks blame the ski patrol for not having been able to avoid these tragedies, for not enforcing the rules enough.  I say we can't be everywhere at the same time, and we can't prevent people from colliding with trees, falling, or performing dangerous stunts.  You can make a ski hill reasonably safe, but you will never be able to make it 100% safe.

 

And our warnings are not as effective as they should.  In today's society, a significant minority of skiers and boarders have been ignoring our warnings, dodging ropes, trying crazy stunts, skiing too fast, skiing while intoxicated, drinking beer and smoking drugs in front of the other clients like it was nothing, showing disrespect to the lift operators and to us, because "it's cool".  We see clients shoving and hitting patrollers and lift operators, we have to call the police because of their aggressive behavior.

That's just BS.  The reason it isn't recognized by everybody as BS is poor parenting.  I was brought up to show respect and assume folks deserved respect until they proved otherwise.  The way I was raised if someone called the tune (skiing too fast, doing dangerous stuff, etc.), and they had to pay the piper, it was on them.    I was brought up to take responsibility for the things I did, and not try to blame someone else for letting me do them.  If you crash your motorcycle doing 180 mph on the back concession, don't try and sue Suzuki for letting you buy a fast bike.

 

  Seems some folks weren't as lucky in the parent department as I was. 

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