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Bumps in P-Tex from Waxing? - Page 2

post #31 of 37

So, Hespe, what is the verdict man??? You going to run them or enshrine them on a wall in a museum somewhere with a plexiglass case around them. Little sign that states " The first pair of skis I messed up by doing my on work". Move on, they are your 'project' skis now. Use them and abuse them, meanwhile it is a learning experience. Get what you can out of them as long as you can. Give them the best treatment you can. Over your lifetime you will save a lot doing your own work, make sure you only mess up on this one pair. save the bindings, edges, some base material and use it on future skis and don't sweat it.

 

Skis, they gonna break, better them than you, my friend!

post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


two things. can you flex the bubble or tap on it to feel if it's hollow, so that it will clamp down. it is remotely possible that adhesive material used to glue the base has filled that space.

 

another fix, if it's less than a mm or so raised, would be to take a sharp chizel and just cut the bubble off flush with the surrounding area, to ski on them for now. If you heated the base up near the edges, you may have a continuing problem.

 

davluri, could you expand on the highlighted bit?  Why is heating the base near the edges a particular problem?  I get that the metal in the edges conducts and holds heat really well (enough to be careful about that), but what else is going on that might be a problem?

post #33 of 37
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by str8d0wn View Post

So, Hespe, what is the verdict man??? You going to run them or enshrine them on a wall in a museum somewhere with a plexiglass case around them. Little sign that states " The first pair of skis I messed up by doing my on work". Move on, they are your 'project' skis now. Use them and abuse them, meanwhile it is a learning experience. Get what you can out of them as long as you can. Give them the best treatment you can. Over your lifetime you will save a lot doing your own work, make sure you only mess up on this one pair. save the bindings, edges, some base material and use it on future skis and don't sweat it.

 

Skis, they gonna break, better them than you, my friend!

Gonna use em.  I didn't get enough use to consider them retired yet.  Found a shop that's confident they can do a good job for about 75 bucks and am considering it but I think I'll see how they ski first.

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowObstacle View Post
  I get that the metal in the edges conducts and holds heat really well (enough to be careful about that), but what else is going on that might be a problem?

 

Sintered HDPE doesn't bond to things very well, including the part of the metal edges that normally sits underneath the plastic (usually  looks like a row of upside down letter Ts).       If whatever bond was achieved by the ski builder is wrecked by heating in one spot, then that spot provides a good starting point for *further* peeling of the base off the ski.     And, close to the edge like that is where snow has the best leverage on any peeled bits of base, as the ski is edged and flexed.

post #35 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

If the bubbles are solid, don't bend easily or at all, get that chizel out(a find person who can use it if necessary) and shave those things off. It's not easy to do, but it can be done. min 1" chizel, larger would be easier to control, and take off a little bit at a time, by starting on the very edge of the bump and moving in toward the center,. good using the good part of the base as a depth guide. good luck.

I would not take a chisel to them. The base structure is going to hold better if it is thicker. I doubt you ever even notice the bubble skiing them. If anything I would do the epoxy injection, but I would not do that unless they got worse. 

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowObstacle View Post
  I get that the metal in the edges conducts and holds heat really well (enough to be careful about that), but what else is going on that might be a problem?

 

Sintered HDPE doesn't bond to things very well, including the part of the metal edges that normally sits underneath the plastic (usually  looks like a row of upside down letter Ts).       If whatever bond was achieved by the ski builder is wrecked by heating in one spot, then that spot provides a good starting point for *further* peeling of the base off the ski.     And, close to the edge like that is where snow has the best leverage on any peeled bits of base, as the ski is edged and flexed.


That makes sense.   Thanks!    And it explains the pattern I get in the wax right next to the edges some times, where it solidifies unevenly, just like inverted T's.

post #37 of 37

Ski them, that's not that bad. I'll bet you won't even notice anything is different about the ski.

 

I bubbled the the tails on my AX3's years ago, they skied fine and I kept skiing them for a another couple years. I had about 10 bumps above the metal edge on both skis, both edges.

 

You don't need perfect bases to ski on. All you need is wax. Ok, flat bases help too.

 

 

 

 IMO people make way to much out of the need for perfect p-tex. But I guess that's how the shops make money...

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