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Positioning

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi Everyone,

 

This is my first post here at Epic Ski.

To make a long story short, skiing is my new passion and i don't care how long it takes or how much money i have to spend i just want to improve.

 

I have started skiing last year, i went only once.

This year i have went out three times.

So i am doing the Pizza 60%-70%

My problem is that i can turn naturally when going from right to left but not from left to right.

When i go from left to right i end up doing the pizza again.

What am i doing wrong? Is this a common problem for beginners?

Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Yamin

post #2 of 10

Very common!  Most people have a stronger turn direction, and a weaker one.  

Can you say more about your turns?  Have you taken a lesson, or are you learning from your friends?

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi Liquid, thanks for the reply.

I have never taken a lesson.

I have just seen instructors give lessons while i was skiing but no i have not gotten a lesson.

I am generally learning through friends.

post #4 of 10

Welcome to the slopes and Epicski!  Where did you go skiing?  A lot of places have package deals (lift ticket, rental equipment, lesson) that include beginner lessons that are well worth considering.  Investing a little time and money in lessons now will pay off in the your level of enjoyment pretty quickly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yamhoss1174 View Post

Hi Everyone,

 

This is my first post here at Epic Ski.

To make a long story short, skiing is my new passion and i don't care how long it takes or how much money i have to spend i just want to improve.

 

I have started skiing last year, i went only once.

This year i have went out three times.

So i am doing the Pizza 60%-70%

My problem is that i can turn naturally when going from right to left but not from left to right.

When i go from left to right i end up doing the pizza again.

What am i doing wrong? Is this a common problem for beginners?

Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Yamin

post #5 of 10
I assume you are right handed? It's normal for us to be one side dominated, just keep practicing.
post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 

Yes i am right handed.

I guess more practice is necessary!

Thanks for the reply.
 

post #7 of 10
Quote:
To make a long story short, skiing is my new passion and i don't care how long it takes or how much money i have to spend i just want to improve.

 

If you keep skiing on your own and trying to improve you'll get better.

 

Good lessons can help you get a LOT better a LOT faster.

 

I'd definitely recommend a few lessons from a professional for a beginner.  Friends can be well-intentioned, but unless they know how to teach, are good at explaining the basics, and are really patient they're not always real helpful.

post #8 of 10
Like playing and instrument, practice that problem with an instructor. Once you learn the basics, it's easier to improve quickly
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Just an Update.

I went out to Windham last weekend.

I think i did it. I feel like i finally learned to ski.

The thing i was doing wrong was that i did not go fast enough.

For some reason i thought that i could initiate turns at slower speeds.

Anyways, i was going much faster and my turns were so easy to make...until i hit mixed snow.

Maybe its my skis but i was feeling uncomfortable in mixed snow.

Should i start going on to the blue tracks?

Thanks you all for your help.

post #10 of 10

Glad you're enjoying skiing. I'd echo what the above posters said about taking a lesson. It might cost a bit of money, but you'll be able to ski more terrain and have fewer bad habits to correct later. Think of it as an investment that pays big dividends for the rest of your life. As skiing is your passion, you'll get much more satisfaction (and be able to ski longer and harder) with the help of a good instructor. 

 

Regarding the items you've described (being unable to link turns at slower speeds; losing it in mixed snow conditions), they can be resolved by developing your technique. For many of us, ski improvement can be a lifelong journey. And the journey of continuous improvement is the fun part. 

 

Whether or not you choose to go to blue runs, make sure you're skiing safe! Check out the alpine responsibility code and ensure you understand and apply all the items on the list. An instructor on the mountain could assess whether or not you're ready to go to blues at your particular mountain. 

 

Good luck!

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