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Volkl Vertigo G3

post #1 of 68
Thread Starter 
I recently demoed the Volkl G3 for a day on Cypress Mountain here in beautiful British Columbia, and was really excited by the ski's snappy performance. As luck would have it I came across the G3 at a great price from a snowboarder who had won it in a contest and was looking to sell quick. So now I'm riding the local peaks on the G3 in the 177cm length. The only problem: It's a great ski, but I think I may have overshot the mark. The review on Peter Keelty's website advises that the G3 is okay for upper intermediates, but it seems a bit too stiff for me to handle well. I'm a solid intermediate, no problem on blue runs, not yet comfortable on blacks, starting to get into powder and steeper stuff. I'm afraid that I will slow down my progress in more difficult terrain by going to a ski that is a tad too stiff/fast. Or should I just work harder at getting comfortable with the G3? How long should it take to get used to a new ski, anyway? Are there some technique adjustments that work well for stiffer boards? I would like to hear from fellow skiers with ideas/suggestions about learning to love the Vertigo G3.
Cheers,
Geoff
post #2 of 68
Geoff

Don't believe all you read.

I was impressed by the reviews for the G31 as a great ski for the advancing all mountain skier and skied them last year. A really intuitive ski. Hard to falt.
This year the G31s were replaced with the G3 under a warrantee issue. The G3's are a great ski as well. I find my 184s too soft! But, they have loads of pop. I really enjoy them in the trees and tough situations in variable snow. They grip like cats!

They were made for skiers like you. Ski them for 5 good days and you will fall in love again.

I sincerly believe a great ski like the G3 can do you no harm no matter what your ability level.

Leave the reviews to the writers. Ski your skis and love 'em.

I ski Volkl P30s at 193, G3 at 184 and Explosives at 180 and I'm lovin life

Worry is interest paid on trouble you don't have.

Don't forget, The tails follow the tips!

CalG
post #3 of 68
G3's are terrific. Ski it center/forward until you feel more comfortable with riding the tails. Shouldn't be too stiff, but you did not include your weight. They are fun skis though I wish I had a pair of fats for the truedeep!
post #4 of 68
Thread Starter 
CalG
Thanks for the positive feedback. Seems like all I need to do is just get to know the G3 better. I can feel the potential energy in the ski but right now it's 3 or 4 nice turns then "What the Hell happened there?!!?" I think the trick for me is to be patient and learn how to ski the G3 to let it do what it was made to. I must admit I like the G3 better than the G31, which I demoed at 188cm and was just too much for me. The softer, turned up tail on the G3 helps a lot.
To JohnJ:
I'm 6ft, 165 lb, 52 years, skiing for 17 years on & off - more on lately - average 20 days on the mountain.
Cheers
Geoff
post #5 of 68
i've run into the same thing before, when going to a stiffer, more demanding ski, though not w/ the g3. it can do wonders for your skiing, b/c you can't get away w/ all the bad habits you could on your more forgiving skis.

stay centered. give 'em some time. be aggressive. they may be more demanding, but they're also much more rewarding once you figure 'em out.
post #6 of 68
Ah.. A fellow Vancouverite! [img]smile.gif[/img]

I had the same experience when I went from a softer intermediate ski to a stiffer expert ski. At first it felt like it was too much ski for me. Now that I've put some real mileage on the ski, I find that it's opened up all kinds of new terrain for me.

I ski Cypress and Whistler. I find that a midfat is too much of a ski for the short confined terrain at Cypress. Your G3 is more suited to the wide open terrain at Whistler. I usually pull out my carving skis for Cypress and save my midfats for Whistler.
post #7 of 68
Thread Starter 
Good point, Wizard
Besides the G3, I also have the Head X-60 in 180cm. I picked it up at Sport Chek earlier this season. It's a middle of the road carving ski and certainly easier to handle on the short runs at Cypress. I will try to get up to Whistler or maybe Mt. Baker and see how the G3 handles on the more wide-open terrain.
post #8 of 68
Geoff,
Aux and others are right on.. Earlier in the season I skied em' ...started out for one afternoon,
but that quickly ended up as three days straight! A lively ski with Volkl edge_hold and (for
NewEngland.....great float) but Yes, a smalllllll sweet spot, which after skiing it for a while..
simply MAKES you a better skier...at least that's what I found out....

$.02
Steve
post #9 of 68
Thread Starter 
Wizard
You say you're riding a mid-fat ski at Whistler and saving your carver skis for little ole Cypress. I'd like to know what make and model of skis you are using. Do you stay away from the moguls at Whistler (and their can be a lot of 'em!) when you're on your mid-fats?
Geoff
post #10 of 68
Thread Starter 
To Aux & HSWC:
What I'm hearing is that I have to be aggressive, stay centered/forward, and get in some serious mileage if I want to have a rewarding relationship with my G3's. Stay out of the back seat, in other words. A new ski demands a new attitude, or at least a sharper awareness of what must be done to succeed. Earlier in this string CalG said I should give it five good days - I have gotten the same kind of advice from snowboarders on getting into boarding - give it five days minimum, not matter how much it hurts... No pain, no gain!
Geoff
post #11 of 68
Geoff,

Despite all the good advice and praises for the G3, a rather light intermediate will have a tough time with a 177cm G3. It is definitely more ski than you need (based on how you described yourself). The fact that others ski it with ease is meaningless. In fact, even the Head X60 in a 180cm length is a lot of ski for an intermediate of your weight. You may be able to handle these skis, but you may also build or encourage bad habits. My advice is to take a few lessons to make sure you get off in the right direction. It will save you some frustration.

Good luck and enjoy your new toys! [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #12 of 68
Thread Starter 
Hey, TomB
Thanks for joining in. Your advice to take some lessons is appreciated. Maybe with all this emphasis on gear we tend to blame everything on our skis and spend too much time beating the bushes in search of the perfect ski. But since this is the Gear Review section, what ski would be your personal choice for a skier like myself?
To review:
Skier - Age 52, upper intermediate, like to get out in all conditions, want to be able to ski the whole mountain, both on and off piste.
Terrain - Confident on Blue runs but getting a bit bored, want to push myself and get into Black runs and Powder
Height-6ft
Weight-165lb (180lb day after XMas)
Geoff
post #13 of 68
Hi, Geoff! Looks like you're fairly new here. You've come to the right place, as many who post here are just like you, and many others who post here are professionals, instructors, and/or true experts. I'm one of the people more like you - we're sort of at the middle of the mountain, so to speak, and we want to get to the top. Someome already mentioned lessons and that's right on. But you came here asking about skis.

First, some sales people or others will tell you to buy a ski that you'll "grow into". Balderdash! While some skis will surely suit you even as you get better and better, you'll go nowhere on a ski that you haven't yet "grown into". Choose a ski that works NOW.

It has been my very great pleasure, and avocation actually, to demo skis continually. Although I just bought a new pair of skis with which I am in love, I will continue to demo skis every chance I get. So I've been on a few pairs of skis, and I believe I've found some that you can enjoy right now - but they also will be great when you become an expert. I know this because even though they work really well for me, experts also love them and choose them.

My criteria for selecting these skis are (1) You can enjoy them right now as an intermediate. (2) You can continue to enjoy them as a true expert. (3) They are capable of helping you both on groomed slopes and in ungroomed snow such as powder, crud, bumps or trees. Here they are:

Dynastar Intuitiv 71 - This is a new, mid season introduction from Dynastar. For a person of your size and skills, the 167 cm length is all you'll need. These are the favorite skis of Stu Campbell, the instruction editor of Ski Magazine. He weighs about 190, is a primo instructor, and he skis them in the next longer length, 175 cm. Here are their positive charactaristics: Smooooth, and solid at any speed, including very fast. You will feel amazingly more confident going fast on these skis. They turn easily, both short turns and long turns. They turn easily at both slow speed and fast speeds. They are wide enough to handle natural snow, although obviously not at the same level as an all out freeride ski - but they're versatile. About the only "negatives", and I even hesitate to call them that, are that they are not super quick edge to edge, and they do not handle deep, heavy snow as well as some of the wider skis - but these really may be less important considerations at your level. Do not be surprised if the Dynastar Intuitiv 71 is named Ski of the Year. The feeling of these skis on snow is just luxurious.

Salomon Crossmax Pilot 10 - These are a new breed of skis in which the bindings and skis come as a set. No holes need to be drilled in the skis to attach the bindings. Each ski has two axles that go through the ski from left to right - one to attach the toe piece and one to attach the heel piece. The result is that the bindings do not inhibit the free flexing of the ski. Although they are marketed as basically an expert ski for groomed, most people I know who've tried them say that they do fine off piste as well. One of the moderators of this site, dchan , calls them his "Superman skis". Your best bet is the 170 cm length. You will not need longer, which also would not be as nimble; and shorter will feel unsteady to you. I loved these skis from the instant I got off the lift. Why didn't I buy them? Because I wanted a pair of skis more biased to go off piste. If I were to be skiing 20% or even 30% off piste and 70% to 80% on groomed, I'd want these skis. Because I did not give these skis the same "wringing out" that I gave to the others mentioned in this post, I'd better just stop right here.

Rossignol Bandit XX - OK, these are what I bought. Why? Because: (1) They are smooth and stable as a rock at high speed. (2) They are 74 mm under foot, and the width and stiffness let them bust through any kind of snow. (3) They are probably some of the quickest turning skis I've been on (4) Even though they're marketed for 50% off piste, 50% on piste, they actually do very well on groomed slopes - better than I would expect a ski of this sort to do. (5) They are lively and quick edge to edge - more than the Dynastar Intuitiv 71, but not more than the Salomon Crossmax Pilot 10 [although they feel livelier and crisper than the Crossmax Pilot 10]. (6) If I had to have just one pair of skis to do everything, forever, the Bandit XX would be it. These are true expert skis - but I, Mr. Mediocre himself, have a blast with them. They will be exactly the same next season as they are this season - no changes. Try finding them to buy right now - they're sold out. Wonder why? Your length and mine in the Bandit XX is 170 cm. Rossignol will say you should go longer - please don't. The 170 is all the ski you will need, and a lot more fun for a skier at your level - and, I believe, even for true experts. Experts who have skied the previous model of Bandit XX frequently ski this 2002 model a size shorter than the previous model. I first tried the 177 and hated it - but I love the 170. The 170 cm won't let you down.

Use the "search" feature to locate reviews of these skis on this "Consumer Gear Reviews" forum. Also, use the search feature on other forums on this site as well to learn more about these three models.

I'll be very interested in learning what you decide and what progress you make, so please keep in touch - both on EpicSki and at my direct e-mail: bgreene@law66.com

[ April 19, 2002, 06:56 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #14 of 68
Geoff,
...and to add $.02 to the advice...I'm 155 and
I stayed on the 170s!...if I can't explore the
little nooks & crannies off-trail at medium speed in the thick stuff...the boards don't stay on my feet that long! I can't remember the last
time I was on a 170 ski...but as mentioned, length reallly matters..as far as knowing how you'd like to ski it...and then sensing the ski's
true character. Get on a ski that, for your
weight, requires you to fly every second of the
trip for it to rebound, hey...it's just not YOUR
ski...as has said time after time...DuH
$.02
post #15 of 68
It is all good advice. Probably the reminder about instruction more to the point. I'm 6'2", 185 lbs. and on the 191cm. Maybe that is wasted in the Midwest, but out West, it is great. It is a fast ski, but a 177 with your height and weight does not seem excessive. It would seem versatile. But then I am probably behind the curve in relating to the NewShortness? Anyway, again the instruction reminder....
post #16 of 68
Maybe 177 in the Bandit single X - but 170 in the Rossi Bandit XX, Salomon Crossmax Pilot 10, and 167 in Dynastar Intuitiv 71. "To thine own self be true." 170 or shorter in the skis I've listed. Be nice to yourself. You have nothing to prove, and everything to enjoy.
post #17 of 68
Thread Starter 
Hey, oboe
Thanks for the reviews on skis you have recently demoed. I was going to request further details on the Rossi Bandit XX, but I looked into your posting entitled "Rossignol Bandit XX - Big Surprise!" and found all the answers to my questions. Man, you really rave about those Bandits! Makes me want to run out and demo a pair again. I say "again" because I have been on both this year's Bandit X and XX. As the Mountain Gods would have it, conditions on the day I demoed the Rossi's at Hemlock Mountain here in BC were not good. The entire mountain was covered in a sheet of ice with no actual snow to be seen. The groomers did what they could but only managed to break it up into ice chunks of various sizes (I think some skiers call this stuff "chicken heads"). Absolutely nobody was skiing off-piste that day. It was cold and windy with heavy cloud cover so the ice didn't have a chance to soften up. The only thing I can say about the XX was that I found it to be more stable than the X while handling well for a wide ski. The X I didn't like at all. It didn't want to skid, and skid was about all one could do with the afore-mentioned ice chunks. It seemed to want to hunt for a turn, find a path, and then stick to it no matter what I wanted to do. But it's foolhardy to form an opinion based on so little evidence. I demoed last years Bandit X and loved it. Also, I demoed both skis in the 184cm length, which as I am beginning to realise is my downfall - miles too long for an intermediate like myself. I look forward to my next opportunity to have a go on the Bandit XX (shorter next time!), with hopes of forming a better opinion. It was interesting to note your differing opinions of the 177cm and 170cm lengths. Length really makes a big difference, something that I have overlooked. One last question: Have you had a chance to try the Volkl Vertigo G3? I'm not yet ready to throw in the towel on the G3. Those two or three good turns I managed to squeeze out were so sweet I wanna do it again, only all the way down the mountain this time. Thanks to John J who offers encouragement by commenting that the G3 in 177cm should be "versatile". More mileage is required, and lessons, mustn't forget the lessons. If I had spent as much money on lessons as I did on equipment, I'd probably be an expert by now, Dammit!
Tune in next season, as all the mountains in this neck of the woods are now closed. (Thanks for coming, please call again, and don't forget to check your Ski Bunnies at the door....)
Now how do I set this alarm clock to go off in precisely 7-1/2 months?.....
Geoff
post #18 of 68
Geoff, I did ski the Volkl G3, and in a length that should be appropriate. The G3 is not a ski I'd encourage you to buy - not because there's anything "wrong" with it, but because I believe that it's not a good fit for you and me. All of the skis I listed above will be available to you for trialing when the snow flies again. My experiences with these have all been on the same versions that will be sold next season. Having skied the G3, the skis I listed above, and a SLEW of others, I will stand by my recommendations as to skis and lengths, and I do not see the G3 as a choice even nearly as good FOR YOU as the ones I've listed above. Again, please keep in touch - I hope you'll put my e-mail into your address book and let me know what happens: bgreene@law66.com

[ April 22, 2002, 04:43 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #19 of 68
Anyone skied the Vertigo Motion? How did it compare to the G3?
post #20 of 68
Geoff,
My carving skis are Rossi Salto's and my midfat are Salomon Xscreams. The stiff tail on the Xscreams took a little getting used to in the moguls. But now that I'm no longer a back-seat flaying fool, moguls are not a problem anymore

The Salto's are quite a bit softer flexing and a lot more fun when ripping up the groomers. I can really feel the edge when I crank them over vs the Xscreams which feel overly damp. On the other hand when skiing off piste at Whistler, the Xscreams really shine because they don't get tossed around as much and cut through the rough stuff a lot better.

The right ski depends on what kind of terrain you like to ski.
post #21 of 68
Thread Starter 
Wizard
Nice to hear from someone with the Rossi Salto - an under-rated ski in my opinion, but a real bargain for those of us who don't want or need the latest product off the Bandit assembly line. I also like the X-Scream. I agree with your opinion -a great ski off-piste but not lively on groomed. For carving the groomers I have the Head X-60(180). I demoed it waaay back in 1999 when it first came out and finally bought Sport Chek's very last pair in March for $299.00 I also have the Elan X-2000(183) but the stiff tail keeps me away from the bumps (I'm not so hot in bumps anyway). Still looking for the perfect mid-fat all mountain ski - I have the Volkl G3 but it will take some getting used to. What are your specs - weight, length you ski, etc?
Cheers
Geoff
post #22 of 68
[ahem] The Rossignol Bandit XX is terrific both on AND off piste. It is constructed with a tapering metal sheet which is wider at the ski's shovel and tapers to a narrower width at the tail. The result is a ski which can, if desired by the skier, intiate a turn either instantly or gradually, while the tail allows easier exit from the turn. It is so surprising that a ski so wide, which excels in off piste skiing, also is so quick edge to edge on the groomed as well, and has such great grip on harder snow. "XX is the one ski to have if your having only one". Humble apologies to the copywriter who composed the jingle of thirty-five years ago for Schaeffer Lager Beer: "Schaeffer [rest rest] is the [rest rest] one beer to have [rest] when you're having more than one"]

[ April 23, 2002, 04:52 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally posted by oboe:
Geoff, I did ski the Volkl G3, and in a length that should be appropriate. The G3 is not a ski I'd encourage you to buy - not because there's anything "wrong" with it, but because I believe that it's not a good fit for you and me. All of the skis I listed above will be available to you for trialing when the snow flies again. My experiences with these have all been on the same versions that will be sold next season. Having skied the G3, the skis I listed above, and a SLEW of others, I will stand by my recommendations as to skis and lengths, and I do not see the G3 as a choice even nearly as good FOR YOU as the ones I've listed above. Again, please keep in touch - I hope you'll put my e-mail into your address book and let me know what happens: bgreene@law66.com
Oboe - I read your excellent reviews on Bandit XX and would be interested to hear your opinion about G3. I demoed both, in different condition, - skied G3 on powder day and it shined there. The strange thing I noticed (I think I posted it somewhere) is the tip: couple of times it got stuck in the pile of snow and one time I fell over. Never seen this in any other skis.

Otherwise - loved them.

Wanted to hear your opinion (is it the skis or my technique to blame here?)
post #24 of 68
NM, I really want to be fair to all, so let me refine my remarks a bit. The first time I skied the Volkl G3 was at the dealers trade show at Stratton in early February. The conditions were primarily "dust on crust" - eastern very "firm" snow. The second time was at Smugglers Notch on an ice day. Now, it could have been the tune, it could have been the conditions - and I'll tell you this, I take my hat off the to the SKI and SKIING magazine testers who need to come to a conclusion about a model of ski in a few runs on limited choice of lengths. I have NOT trialed the G3 to the same extent that I have trialed the Bandit XX or the Dynastar Intuitiv 71. However, the skis I listed as favorites are skis that were great from the get go, and just kept on being great trial after trial after trial - meaning on many differnt days. The Salomon Crossmax Pilot 10 I skied at Stratton and later at Smugglers Notch, and it always was a nifty ski. The G3 always felt more ponderous to me, but as I say, I have my suspicions it could have been the tune and the conditions.

Now as to you sticking the ski tip into the snow, it would depend on how many times it happened. My K2 Mod 7/8's [todays Axis no X] is a SUPERB natural snow ski. Yet, on a difficult day, I managed to jam that into a pile of snow - never would have believed that could happen with that ski! So, as I say, it depends.

On the other hand, the Bandit XX, once I zeroed in on the length best suited for me and learned to adjust to its charactaristics, just does everything well and never has problems. Tested on the same day on the same trails on the same snow, the XX was head and shoulders above my K2's and the Dynastar Intuitive 71. It also was quicker in the trees - and all this came as a complete surprise to me.

I'm not sure I've answered your question, and I'm not sure I can. I will say that jamming the tip into the snow is going to be more likely if you are not centered. Of course, not everyone has the time, the facilities or the inclination to demo skis to the extent that I do. Nevertheless, there's no better way to zero in on YOUR ski than to demo to the hilt - not one day, but many days. Not in one kind of condition, but in many kinds of conditions.

Let me know, if you will, what you eventually conclude. And on my part, when I have the chance [have to be next season, though] I will do a better job of wringing out the Volkl G3, the Motion version of that, and the Salomon Crossmax Pilot 10. And that is even though I had such confidence in the Rossignol Bandit XX that I just had to buy it. I have no doubt that I will never regret it. As I have said, this ski is SOLD OUT!!! Gotta wonder why.

[ April 23, 2002, 09:05 PM: Message edited by: oboe ]
post #25 of 68
Thread Starter 
NM:
Check out Foot Loose Sports review of the Volkl G3 (www.footloosesports.com) They recommend it for "bigger skiers or the technically gifted." To me that means you either have to be heavy enough to bend the thing into the turn or you need top-level skills to figure how to ski it. I found the G3 to be a demanding ski, no relaxing allowed. It won't come to you, you have to work with it. As always, the best thing is to demo, demo, demo. But of course I'm incapable of taking my own advice. I bought the Head X-60 based on a mere 1/2 day of testing, and got lucky. The X-60 is great. I did the same thing with the G3, with somewhat different results. But what the heck. Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer chances! On a brighter note, Oboe's excellent reviews in support of the Bandit XX have convinced me that my life will be incomplete until I have thoroughly tested it in both 170 and 177 cm lengths. Fortunately for me Mt Baker is still open for business. I plan to check out their high performance rentals this weekend.
Geoff
post #26 of 68
Oboe, Geoff - thanks for your detailed response.

I think I have narrowed my choices to G3 and XX, and this is the reason I am keen on hearing others opinions.

It seemed I had all sorts of falls/mistakes while skiing, but I had never experienced this issue with the tips, and this makes me puzzled, because otherwise I would have bought G3 - it was light, quick and very precise for me, much easier to hanlde the tracked pow than my Series. I also loved XX, but G3 felt more precise and powerful. I am not heavyweight (122 lbs), it just feels like it fits my skiing better.
post #27 of 68
NM,
I'm curious as to what length you demoed when trying the G3 and the XX? I ski a 160 xscream myself being a lightweight 140 lbs.
post #28 of 68
Quote:
Originally posted by wizard:
NM,
I'm curious as to what length you demoed when trying the G3 and the XX? I ski a 160 xscream myself being a lightweight 140 lbs.
wizard, my series are 169 cm, and G3 and XX I demoed were 170 cm.
post #29 of 68
Thread Starter 
NM:
At 122 lb, you are 15 lb lighter than my 12 yr old son and definitely qualify as a lightweight. He's a good skier and zips down the mountain on board 160cm Bandits. You have demoed the G3 and XX in 170cm. That could be a bit long, you should try the next shorter length. I'm 6 ft, 165 lb and have skied the G3 (177cm) in heavy West Coast powder (why do I even call it "powder"?) and haven't had the problem with the tip that you describe. Maybe you're too far forward and the tip is diving in the powder. Best thing is to have a good instructor critique your technique ("critique your technique" - how poetic!) to see if you have a bad habit that you're not aware of. Put this on your "To Do" list for next season.
Cheers, Geoff
post #30 of 68
Quote:
Originally posted by Geoff Prescott:
NM:
At 122 lb, you are 15 lb lighter than my 12 yr old son and definitely qualify as a lightweight. He's a good skier and zips down the mountain on board 160cm Bandits. You have demoed the G3 and XX in 170cm. That could be a bit long, you should try the next shorter length. I'm 6 ft, 165 lb and have skied the G3 (177cm) in heavy West Coast powder (why do I even call it "powder"?) and haven't had the problem with the tip that you describe. Maybe you're too far forward and the tip is diving in the powder. Best thing is to have a good instructor critique your technique ("critique your technique" - how poetic!) to see if you have a bad habit that you're not aware of. Put this on your "To Do" list for next season.
Cheers, Geoff
My current skis (series) are 169 and I do not feel they are too long for me. When I demo'd XX and G3 in 170 I also did not feel any lenght issue, but it may be because I never skied anything shorter..

Regarding the tip problem - the SKIING mag also reports 'light tip that can get twitchy', but for Vertigo Motion...Well, I know this happens because of my technique, just do not want to admit it [img]smile.gif[/img]
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