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What is meant by 'instep'?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Probably a dumb question, I know, but it's not a term I normally use. I ask because I got some Zipfit liners fitted the other day to replace the packed out liners in my Head Raptor 115 RS boots. The boot fitter observed that width-wise the 98mm last was OK for my rather narrow, skinny feet, and length-wise the shell fit was OK (probably a little under 15mm, slightly less than I had thought, which explains why the next size down was unworkable for me). My main problem issue was actually to do with instep, by which he meant, I think, that my foot was too 'shallow' for most boots to provide a snug fit - there would be likely to be a little room above my foot unless I buckled down very tightly (which is indeed my experience).

 

I haven't had a chance to ski with the Zipfits yet but I hope they address this problem. If they don't fully address it, what recommendations are there for boots which are likely to provide a snug fit for a 'shallow' foot (I'm sure there's a better word than that)?

post #2 of 6

J2R,

 

     You could/should put a shim (dense cardboard) under the liner, this will push the liner and your foot upward from front to rear and you would not then be required to over tighten the lower shell (over tightening the lower shell distorts it). Do you have custom foot beds?

 

mike

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

I have actually been using volume reducing shims for some time, not cardboard but ones I made myself from flexible vinyl floor tile (the ideal material for this, IMHO, as it's durable and non-compressible and can easily be cut to shape). There is presumably a difference in the mechanics of the boot, though, between taking up space below or above the liner? How thick a shim could I use before starting to put the moving parts of my feet and ankles in the wrong position relative to the moving parts of the boots?

 

As regards footbeds, I do actually have some Conform'able custom ones which I had made up last year. I find I actually ski better in some off-the-shelf DownUnders instead, though, so they are what I tend to use.

post #4 of 6

Comfortably push the foot upward against the shell and then, don't tighten the boot downward over the foot, then it won't go to sleep.  Tighten the ankle buckle till it hurts then back off till it is just comfortable, this will hold your heel/foot in the back of the shell and provide good control.  

 

the floor tile makes sense to me.

 

mike

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestions.

 

But to get back to my original question, "what is meant by instep". For the situation I'm describing above, am I looking for a boot with a high instep or a low instep or what? Or is it me that has the instep (presumably low), not the boot?

post #6 of 6

You have the instep---the boot has a generic shape that is presumed to fit a given group of foot shapes---if you have a lower instep than the boot you purchased you may need to adapt (use a shim) to get the correct fit.  If you use the lower 2 buckles to pull the shell downward against the foot you will usually end up with uneven pressure under one of the buckles.  It is not necessary to clamp the foot to get good control.

 

mike

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