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Forward pressure indicator on Marker bindings for integrated K2

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

The SO received a gift a couple of years ago of a pair of brand-new K2 skis in the "Luv" series, with bundled Marker bindings.  She didn't feel comfortable enough with her skiing to use her own skis, until yesterday.  Next time, she wants to go out on her own skis, so I am trying to get the bindings set up.*

 

The skis come with a preinstalled set of rails and the bindings are secured to those.  One screw for the toe piece, two screws for the heel piece.  Easy enough, given the markings on the rails and knowing her boot sole length.

 

I know her DIN setting, and can dial that in.  So far so good.

 

The problem I'm having is finding any visual indicator of latched-in forward pressure.  As far as I can see, there are two screws in the rear--a black recessed one for dialing in the DIN setting, and a bright one that ratchets the heel piece fore and aft.  Neither screw seems to move to any great extent when the boot is latched in vs. when it is out.  I also don't see any needles, windows, etc.  Consequently, I don't know where exactly to check to make sure the heel piece is ratcheted to the correct location in terms of forward pressure.

 

I have searched the forums, and the best posts I found so far on the subject were in the thread: http://www.epicski.com/t/114515/adjusting-demo-bindings-to-different-boot-length

 

However, the Rossignol bindings whose instructions were linked have a window with some sort of force indicator, and in that same thread, the Marker bindings discussed have a screw that is supposed to sit flush.  I don't see anything like that on these bindings.  Could I get some help on this?

 

I've attached photos.  Hopefully they're useful, and if not, I'll provide any other photos suggested.  Thanks for any help.

 

*The following is for people who would rather tell me to take these to a professional.  The advice to see a "professional" is often given, and fine if someone doesn't have the mechanical aptitude to do what's necessary.  I'm an engineer.  I figure if I pay attention to details, understand the principles, and trust myself to do things like changing brake rotors or calipers on my cars or my loved ones', I'm OK to install some bindings.  I also know my limits, and wouldn't attempt to, say, tune skis without the appropriate tools.  Not to mention many of these "professionals" are high school kids not necessarily intent on being very precise with their work.  OK, disclaimer off!

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 12

The lower of the two screws in the rear of the heel is the fwd pressure adjustment (the upper screw being the din adjustment). When you you turn it the heel moves fore/aft etc. When the boot is out of the binding the silver screw proturdes about 4mm from the rear face of the heel piece. Adjust so that when the boot is installed the head of the silver screw is flush with the rear face of the heel piece. Remove the boot when turning the screw that reinstall the boot to test etc. Simples!

post #3 of 12

Screw circled in red should be flush with the black housing when boot is clicked in.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

spyderjon and huhh :

 

Thank you very much!  Got it.  My mistake was as I latched in the boot previously, I could see the toe piece "wings" on top deflecting, and some of the molding flash on the boot sole heel got scraped off, so I thought I'd already tightened things up into the correct range.  Apparently, it was still too loose.  Once I advanced the heel piece another 4-5 clicks forward, I saw the behavior you guys described and the screw went inward upon latching in.

 

Thanks again.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Screw circled in red should be flush with the black housing when boot is clicked in.

 

 

correction:  the back of the screw should be flush for someone with a DIN 5 and over. the heel housing should line up with the etched circle for people 4.5 and lower. always set the forward adjustment screw to where it should be, release boot, click back in then check again. dont just set it and forget it. that will give you an accurate reading.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by dictoresno View Post

 

 

correction:  the back of the screw should be flush for someone with a DIN 5 and over. the heel housing should line up with the etched circle for people 4.5 and lower. always set the forward adjustment screw to where it should be, release boot, click back in then check again. dont just set it and forget it. that will give you an accurate reading.

 



I'd like to see your source...

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

 



I'd like to see your source...

 

markers have always been that way. ill check our shop manual, but for as long as i have been adjusting markers, the inscribed line has always been for 4.5 and under and 5 and over has always been flush.

post #8 of 12
One comment to the engineer: Every shop I've ever visited relies on the described adjustments for the INITIAL setting of forward pressure, but they use a torque measuring type of tool to TEST the actual release adjustments. If you're happy with some Asian factory workers paid $1 an hour actually getting every part of the binding system correct so that your spouse's legs are safe, then go for it. Otherwise, I'd go where the proper testing can be completed.
post #9 of 12
Where's the delete button for duplications?
post #10 of 12

Working in a shop for over twenty years and a former Salomon Rep, I've dealt with just about every binding out there on the market, and with Marker? you do have to pop the boot in and out a few times due to the fact that it changes a few times before settling in. The best advice I can give as well? just to add to the comments? is to take it to a shop where Kneale Brownson did mention that all shops use a torque wrench to test the bindings. To test that they fall within release values. I have had a few NEW bindings fail, and test way too high, which means that it would take double your weight in order to come out, rather then the normal release values. With older bindings its good to test them every season or every thirty days of skiing in order to assure that the bindings are functioning correctly and working within there release values. I know there are those who do work on there own bindings out there, and the only thing I can say? Do you drive without insurance? kinda the same thing, just to be on the safe side, take it to a shop and let a technician test them to make sure they are working properly.

post #11 of 12

Here is the Marker Bindings Technical Manual 2013-2014 link:

 

http://www.markercanada.com/pdf/manual/13%2014%20Tech%20Manual%20USA.pdf

post #12 of 12
I don't know what kind of engineer you are, but it hardly matters. Unless you know what a well trained, intelligent and diligent shop monkey knows instinctively, you're taking risks with your beloved's life. Let's hope she doesn't take a bad fall and prove you wrong just so you can save a few bucks or have fun with a novel do it yourself project.

Good luck, whatever you do.
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