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Best $490.00 spent in a long time (1/2 day private)

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I just took a 1/2 day private to work on bumps and tracked out tight terrain. I came away with just a couple tweaks that have changed my skiing. I need to engrain these new skills but it has already improved my skiing and will no doubt continue to do so.  So although it seems like a lot of cash (and it is) consider how much you spend on everything to go skiing and not ski as well as you want to.......  it becomes a bargain....  oh, and don't forget the tip too.  icon14.gif

post #2 of 13

Last year I did a morning group lesson that wound up being an accidental audition, followed by a two hour afternoon private.  It was a great investment -- fixed things that were getting progressively worse in my skiing and got me back on track.  Total cost (with a big tip) was a little over half what you paid (with a big tip).

 

I agree, privates are an amazing luxury, and amazingly effective.

post #3 of 13
I agree, Fin.

So, what were those tweaks?
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgeib View Post

I agree, Fin.

So, what were those tweaks?

 

1- start runs standing up fully- I have a tendency to enter/start with legs flexed.  keeping fully extended really gets things started off correctly and in much more balance and control especially when dropping down the side of a cat track into tighter trees

2- stop upwards movements, let legs do the retraction extension. I had a bad habit of too much upward movement to get edge release and movement into the next direction.

3a- stay extended going into compression/rut/bump- absorb and then pull back feet as you extend and pushing the tips down on the backside of whatever you are going over/around/down (that could be a bump/log or steeper drop).  I still have a harder time pressing the tips down but I did find that I was starting to do this much better. It was more of a timing issue to get in front of the turn as you pull the feet back, letting your body move far enough over the skis so that its much easier to tip down.

3b- useful pole plant with good countering and head/body movement leading into turn, keeping body in the fall line. I tended to not counter enough going left to right.  Some of this is left over from the fall last season. I still have a very painful area on my lower shin into the ankle that I am dealing with.

 

That's about the best I can explain. I can tell you that it was pretty much what I do on the groomed already; he just got me to translate to the bumps and trees. I find it's much easier for me to do this in the trees than in a bump field for some reason but I do have mental issues... 

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

 

1- start runs standing up fully- I have a tendency to enter/start with legs flexed.  keeping fully extended really gets things started off correctly and in much more balance and control especially when dropping down the side of a cat track into tighter trees

2- stop upwards movements, let legs do the retraction extension. I had a bad habit of too much upward movement to get edge release and movement into the next direction.

3a- stay extended going into compression/rut/bump- absorb and then pull back feet as you extend and pushing the tips down on the backside of whatever you are going over/around/down (that could be a bump/log or steeper drop).  I still have a harder time pressing the tips down but I did find that I was starting to do this much better. It was more of a timing issue to get in front of the turn as you pull the feet back, letting your body move far enough over the skis so that its much easier to tip down.

3b- useful pole plant with good countering and head/body movement leading into turn, keeping body in the fall line. I tended to not counter enough going left to right.  Some of this is left over from the fall last season. I still have a very painful area on my lower shin into the ankle that I am dealing with.

 

That's about the best I can explain. I can tell you that it was pretty much what I do on the groomed already; he just got me to translate to the bumps and trees. I find it's much easier for me to do this in the trees than in a bump field for some reason but I do have mental issues... 

 

I think, for me, it's much easier to choose a line in the trees.

 

How did you work on the "head/body movement leading into the turn"?

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

well, I pretty much do that on the groomed so it wasn't really a new thing for me,  when you are keeping a good counter and facing the new turn it's pretty much intuitive, You just look where you are headed wink.gif  so this pic is pretty good example, I am poling to the left and turning my head and upper body at the same time; which effectively leads the turn, I have created countering (skis are to the right) my upper body is leaning to the left, lower body is still to the right and my eyes are already where I am going to end up once I extend the legs and release the edges. this is also where you can pull the feet back which pulls your mass into the new direction

 

 

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

well, I pretty much do that on the groomed so it wasn't really a new thing for me,  when you are keeping a good counter and facing the new turn it's pretty much intuitive, You just look where you are headed wink.gif  so this pic is pretty good example, I am poling to the left and turning my head and upper body at the same time; which effectively leads the turn, I have created countering (skis are to the right) my upper body is leaning to the left, lower body is still to the right and my eyes are already where I am going to end up once I extend the legs and release the edges. this is also where you can pull the feet back which pulls your mass into the new direction

 

 

A question, if I may: As you say, your eyes are where you will end up once you release and extend. Is that far enough ahead? Or do you want your vision farther downhill?

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

 

A question, if I may: As you say, your eyes are where you will end up once you release and extend. Is that far enough ahead? Or do you want your vision farther downhill?

I would say that depends on the terrain, speed and your objectives. for fast open groomers, absolutely. for picking through trees and tight spots not as far. Keep in mind this is a 1/1000 of a second in time.  My head is in this direction at this moment, but before my skis are through the turn, I am already into the new direction/turn after I have already looked across the line and decided where and when to turn. I may have ended up going straight, making another right to left turn or set an edge and pivoted left to right.  

post #9 of 13

Favorite line of mine is "look where you're going to be going."

 

I find that even with intermediates that I'm coaching this helps.  It doesn't rotate the shoulders, but often just having them look in the new direction and the hips follow automatically.

 

"Once you're in a turn, that turn is over, forget about it.  Start moving into the next turn."

 

Glad you had a great lesson Finn.  

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Favorite line of mine is "look where you're going to be going."

 

I find that even with intermediates that I'm coaching this helps.  It doesn't rotate the shoulders, but often just having them look in the new direction and the hips follow automatically.

 

"Once you're in a turn, that turn is over, forget about it.  Start moving into the next turn."

 

Glad you had a great lesson Finn.  

 

yeah, I like that!  Eric Lipton (demo team) once told me while in the lodge to go walk through a door way.  I did and then he said did you look to the left or right? Did you look at the sides of the door or just right through the opening..  Deep...  wink.gif  it's so true though.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
Eric Lipton (demo team) once told me while in the lodge to go walk through a door way.  I did and then he said did you look to the left or right? Did you look at the sides of the door or just right through the opening..  Deep...  wink.gif  it's so true though.

I like this for trees.

I might modify it to make a point and have people walk through a doorway while staring at the door jamb - since that's what they tend to do in trees - stare at them instead of the space they're skiing into. I just tried it - it's very odd and weird. It takes effort to walk through the space staring at the jamb and once through, it's "now what?" - you're not prepared for the next move.

If you look at the white space you're skiing into, then you see only the few trees that define a path, not the whole damn forest.

post #12 of 13

I've said before, but I always ask, " how we're those trees?" The correct answer is always, "what trees?"  The idea being of course to focus on the white stuff. smile.gif

post #13 of 13

Yes, look at the white stuff!

 

Try this:

 

http://youtu.be/nkn3wRyb9Bk

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