or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why do you ski? - Page 4

post #91 of 105
Thread Starter 
It's a new season. More people are frequenting the boards in anticipation of their first tracks or that first big powder day.

So, why do you ski?
post #92 of 105

Because it connects me to the child I used to be.

post #93 of 105

funsies.

post #94 of 105

For the feelings it creates, physical and emotional.

post #95 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post

Because of the FEELING.

Smooth curving movements, acceleration, deacceleration, bouncing, upon a soft smooth substance feeling its softness playing with gravity, can be pleasant neuronal sensations to creature bodies.
This. Just this.

Setting aside the long story of how I got to the point where I had grown away from my old adventurous life where one-pointed focus was just part of the routine, and recovering from an illness that I thought made it impossible to ever get there again, I left the parking lot after my first time skiing in what seemed like forever and immediately had to pull over because I was blinded by tears. I had spent months trying to come to terms with what I thought was the fact that I'd never be able to go outside and use my body to move through a beautiful place, have my whole being focused and engaged, and experience the wonder of being alive in this world of beauty. As pathetic as it might have looked to everyone around me, those few hours tore away the scrim of delusion that I had to surrender all that mattered to me, and I could finally see again how damned lucky I am to be a human being.

Whether it's a good day on skis or a bad day on skis, sunny or windy or snowy or rainy, agony or ecstasy, when I'm skiing there's no barrier between me and the moment. I can trust my body, and the sensations feel better than anything else I've experienced, and I mean anything. wink.gif Skiing is a reminder that all of that is still there. And after all this time and all of the compromise, the fact that I can still experience it means that in truth, I can't surrender it, because the ability to do so is as much a part of me as my beating heart.

So take that, rx2ski! Just think about standing at the top of that first run, with your consciousness and body sense gathering together in preparation. You know what you have to do. You know you'll do it. You've been patient so far, just a little bit more will get you there. I know that "it'll get better" isn't much comfort. But try to imagine what it was like for you out there on the mountain, and hang on, because it's still waiting for you.

Geez, I miss skiing so much that reading this thread and writing that made me tear up. Five more days. I can make it for five more days...
post #96 of 105

I ski because I tried it at the tender age of 13 -  to meet cut guys.  I ski now because I can't stop.  Like others I am an unashamed addict.  In my 20's I decided skiing was important enough to be a dating criteria.  I only dated skiers which, in SoCal, can be a bit limiting. Happily, it was a good rule and it worked out well.  I can't define why I love skiing.  I just do.  It's a driving force that determines all our family vacations, eats up all our "disposable" income, and I wouldn't change a thing.

post #97 of 105

I think I figured this out last night when I went outside and shoveled the driveway at 1am in the middle of a storm.  I love the snow.

post #98 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post


This. Just this.

Setting aside the long story of how I got to the point where I had grown away from my old adventurous life where one-pointed focus was just part of the routine, and recovering from an illness that I thought made it impossible to ever get there again, I left the parking lot after my first time skiing in what seemed like forever and immediately had to pull over because I was blinded by tears. I had spent months trying to come to terms with what I thought was the fact that I'd never be able to go outside and use my body to move through a beautiful place, have my whole being focused and engaged, and experience the wonder of being alive in this world of beauty. As pathetic as it might have looked to everyone around me, those few hours tore away the scrim of delusion that I had to surrender all that mattered to me, and I could finally see again how damned lucky I am to be a human being.

Whether it's a good day on skis or a bad day on skis, sunny or windy or snowy or rainy, agony or ecstasy, when I'm skiing there's no barrier between me and the moment. I can trust my body, and the sensations feel better than anything else I've experienced, and I mean anything. wink.gif Skiing is a reminder that all of that is still there. And after all this time and all of the compromise, the fact that I can still experience it means that in truth, I can't surrender it, because the ability to do so is as much a part of me as my beating heart.

So take that, rx2ski! Just think about standing at the top of that first run, with your consciousness and body sense gathering together in preparation. You know what you have to do. You know you'll do it. You've been patient so far, just a little bit more will get you there. I know that "it'll get better" isn't much comfort. But try to imagine what it was like for you out there on the mountain, and hang on, because it's still waiting for you.

Geez, I miss skiing so much that reading this thread and writing that made me tear up. Five more days. I can make it for five more days...

 

Litterbug, I think I'm going to have to print out your post and put in in my pocket and read it before I take my first run back on skis! Thank you!

post #99 of 105

Because it is as close to flying as one can get, without leaving the ground.

 

Becase it is like dancing with the mountain.

 

Because it is the most fun one can have without taking one's clothes off.  

post #100 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post
 

I can't define why I love skiing.  I just do. 

 

This. Does anyone else see the first flakes and smile and feel better...and feel that way anytime it snows? For as long as I can remember, even as a little kid in Wisconsin, when the first weather reports would mention snow, I would sit by the window and wait...and wait...and wait...brother and sister in bed, mom reading...and me just sitting and staring out the window. There seems to be a difference btwn "people who ski" and "skiers." When I was a kid, I remember walking into the lodge at closing and getting yelled at b/c my family had been waiting to leave for an hour or so....nowadays, my friends who ski, get really sick of me yapping on and on about skis, ski gear, boots, ski movies, mountains, etc.  I don't know what it is...but it's something that's inside that believes that skiing and snow is magical and good for us.

 

One other reason: since I started him skiing at the age of 4 (my son is almost 9), we've been bonded by it. We can go skiing together and everything seems the way it should be. We don't need to be at the same level to ski together...it just works the way it should be. If he messed up in the a.m., once we're riding the lift, I put my arm around him and everything seems the way it should be. If I yelled at him and I shouldn't have, once we're skiing, it seems to go away and everything is the way it should be. Skiing connects us and I hope it always will...just the way it should be.  

post #101 of 105

For the pure pleasure of it.

 

If I couldn't do it anymore I would find something else that feels good physically, but I wouldn't be as happy

post #102 of 105

Well lots of reasons I ski, I'll bet most of 'em have already been listed.  However, I've been reading this thread:  Time for the Code of Conduct to be updated and it's reminded me of another reason I love skiing.

 

So, the thread is a discussion of right of way on a crowded slope.  Many of the posters have stated that 'defensive' skiing is key.  That is, to assume that the folks you're sharing the hill with are going to do any and all sorts of stupid, random stuff, oblivious to their surroundings.

 

Which makes me think, this is often how I'm forced to think in my professional life and it's how I think when I'm driving in traffic and once in awhile it's how I feel I need to think in my personal life.  But, ya know, I kinda like the feeling of leaving that behind when I'm on the mountain.  I love the feeling of kinship between snow sliders, the feeling of being among my own kind, the spirit of cooperation, the feeling that the oblivious folks ya gotta watch out for do not inhabit my favorite places.

 

I understand.  I've skied on crowded groomers and I've even had a couple of close calls, I know the value of defensive behavior in these situations.  But if this is how I had to behave the majority of my time on skis, I don't think I'd be to awfully drawn to it.

 

So I guess I'll say that one of the reasons I ski is that when I'm in the bumps, trees or on a sweet empty groomer.... or in my fave parking lot, I feel like I'm with like minded peeps and the dummies are back down there closer to sea level.

post #103 of 105

Cuz it's teh funz, duuuh?

post #104 of 105

When I ski nothing else in the world matters.

post #105 of 105
Massive surge of endorphins.....I'm addicted and obsessed. If I couldn't ski, I would still need to be near snow. My hubby and I already planning our retirement as ski bums. We want to ski in both hemispheres. We bought a condo in Canada this year and hope to one day buy a place at Hotham in the Oz Alps. I also plan to do XC skiing and go out jogging in snowshoes. I keep fit so I can ski. Skiing makes me very happy. I giggle when I ski; I feel like a kid being chased in a game of tiggy (tag).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion