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Bindings Question

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I just bought my first pair of skis and had my local shop mount the bindings. During my first day on the hill I noticed that the bindings were extremely difficult to get out of....to the point where my poles wobble violently when attempting to step out of them (something I never experienced with rentals). Is it normal for brand new bindings to be so tough to undo? Or does it sound like they are just too tight and need to be loosened? Several times throughout the day I thought I was gonna snap my poles.

 

'12 K2 AMP Force

Marker M3 10.0

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 19

I've never had a hard time releasing bindings.

What  DIN release number is your binding set at?

How spindly are your poles?

post #3 of 19

Maybe your forward pressure is too high. Did you take it to a reputable shop?

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

Yes i did take it to a reputable shop....not at the mountain but here in Austin.

 

DIN - 7

 

poles are 2012 k2 Comp ( I tried with a different set of poles, this time metal, and had the same difficulty)

 

Im gonna let someone at Telluride Sports look at them when I go in two weeks....I was just wondering if anyone else knew of newly installed Marker's being hard to get out of... (I really dont know anything about bindings which is why I'm asking)

post #5 of 19

I've found Markers to be harder to get out of than other bindings I've used, but not that hard.. ( Even harder to click in.) It's worth checking the forward pressure yourself.  

You can check the forward pressure yourself.  On the back of the heel piece there should be a small screw protruding maybe 3/16 inch. (Not the big screw that adjusts DIN).  With your boot in the binding the end of the screw should now be flush with the back of the binding.  If it's not you probably shouldn't use the skis until you have a shop fix it. If there's too much forward pressure (end of screw inside heel piece) the bindings won't release properly. 

post #6 of 19

There are numerous reports of people with shorter boot lengths - i.e., mostly women - having trouble releasing Marker Griffons and Squires. There is a big long thread on it at Ski Diva. In fact when I was considering new bindings Philplug advised me of the issue.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
The forward pressure seems to be ok...the screw is flush when the boot is in
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanny View Post

The forward pressure seems to be ok...the screw is flush when the boot is in

Don't use your pole. I usually step on the heel lever with my other ski and then use the free boot to step on the remaining ski.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

Don't use your pole. I usually step on the heel lever with my other ski and then use the free boot to step on the remaining ski.


I can't believe someone who cares as much about ski tuning as you wrote this.

post #10 of 19

Aren't all the surfaces plastic or encased in plastic or rubber? hope so, been doing that forever.   I'd have to go back to twisting my toe out, and I'm not sure my knees would still be happy with that.

post #11 of 19

I step on my heals and have never done any damage, but i also use my ski's so I'm more interested in the big scratches or the core shot at the end of the day.  IMO it's the best and easier way to get out of the binding, especially more difficult bindings with high DIN values.

post #12 of 19

   I recently broke off the tip of one of my composite ski poles while trying to release the heel piece of a 20 din marker binding....nonono2.gif  I wonder if the OP's poles are composite or aluminium.

 

      zenny

post #13 of 19

Are you by chance keeping significant weight on the boot you are trying to release? Just trying to not miss the most obvious.

post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 

haha no ^^^^^^ when checking the forward pressure I had the boot in the binding by itself and it was difficult to release pressing down on it it with my hand...

post #15 of 19

the DIN is set based on your information, including boot sole length....not how easy it is to get in and out. you dont "loosen" them to aide that either. if the shop set your DIN properly, and your forward pressure, then dont touch it. also, some of the newer markers are a little tempermental. the way the heel lever is designed is alot harder to open then previous years models.

 

and stop using your poles to open them before you snap them in half. reach down and use your hands.
 

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post


I can't believe someone who cares as much about ski tuning as you wrote this.

 

That's what happens when an Atomicman skis Heads. nonono2.gif

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Aren't all the surfaces plastic or encased in plastic or rubber? hope so, been doing that forever.   I'd have to go back to twisting my toe out, and I'm not sure my knees would still be happy with that.

Not really... at least not on race models of Tyrolia (Fischer/Head/Elan). I still do this when I'm working, since I have no poles with me at that time, but when skiing, poles are only way to get out of first ski (boot does it good for second ski). They bend (at least carbon ones does), but they are never even close to breaking, even though I most likely ski with higher DIN settings then most of people. Besides... racers ski with much much higher settings, and majority is on carbon poles, yet I don't remember anyone who would break poles getting out of ski ;)

post #18 of 19

The K2 Force uses a lower model binding where with this new "system" I find it hard to get an accurate Forward pressure setting, not like a "flat" binding that you use a regular template to mount. With any of these "systems" you get a "guesstamate" where the forward pressure is set. I know typically the lower the DIN, the more back of the screw can sit just behind where its supposed to sit, or more inside, meaning moving the heel piece more forward toward the toe in order to give a tighter fit. The problem I have its either or, no in between, giving the technician a less accurate fit. In answer to getting out of the binding? that does sound like the forward pressure is greater then usual, but its the only way it will function without you just "walking" out of the binding.

post #19 of 19

Have them double check the forward pressure and test them on a calibrated machine.

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