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Made a vid of me skiing

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I made it miself so I had to hold the camera in my hand, so you probably can guess it was not the optimal for seeing me ski, but still..

Anyway im relatively new to skiing, self taugh miself, went few times and this is pretty much where im at now.

So I was hoping you guys can see what im doing wrong or what im doing good, or what I should change or improve to ski better etc..

I hope you guys can see well from this angle, otherwise I guess I at least tried.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwBSLE8y4Bk&feature=youtu.be

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4y61jei7w_8&feature=youtu.be


Edited by iLoveSkiing - 2/11/13 at 8:10am
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 

Nobody?

post #3 of 10

Not the easiest thing to do with what the video shows but I'll take a stab at it.

 

First, since you're holding the camera to film yourself, it isn't a true showing of your skiing.  It is best to see the entire skier and have some reference of the terrain.  Looks like its a groomed green trail.  

 

Based on the way your skis are twisting side to side independent of each other and the fact your knees are behind your toes the entire time, it looks like you're in the back seat.  Your skis (for the most part) should act like the front wheels off your car; independent suspension but they turn at the same rate at the same time.  This isn't an absolute truth but from the looks of the terrain in the video, I would expect it there. 

 

For your body position, get more pressure to the front of your skis by trying to get your knees to touch your toes.  I know it isn't possible but is a directional goal or target.  The angle at the front of your ankle, back of the knee and front of the hip should be close to equal.  This should put your shin and spine parallel and femur perpendicular to them.  I hope that makes sense.

 

it also looks like your stance is a little wide; not a lot but could come in some.  Your feet should be no further apart than your hips.  This will help with your skis moving as a team too.  Your ankle, knees, and hip should be stacked.

 

the good news is you've done pretty good for teaching yourself.  You're maintaining control, are linking turns and can stop.  This isn't the easiest thing for people to pick up on their own.  Aside from the fact that I'm an instructor, I would urge you to take a lesson or two because you will have more of the mountain opened to you.  There is a big difference between getting down a trail and skiing it well.  This is a life long pursuit and the better your foundation skills, the more fun you will have.

 

keep at it and see if you can get someone else to video you showing your entire body.

 

have fun,

 

Ken

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Not the easiest thing to do with what the video shows but I'll take a stab at it.

 

First, since you're holding the camera to film yourself, it isn't a true showing of your skiing.  It is best to see the entire skier and have some reference of the terrain.  Looks like its a groomed green trail.  

 

Based on the way your skis are twisting side to side independent of each other and the fact your knees are behind your toes the entire time, it looks like you're in the back seat.  Your skis (for the most part) should act like the front wheels off your car; independent suspension but they turn at the same rate at the same time.  This isn't an absolute truth but from the looks of the terrain in the video, I would expect it there. 

 

For your body position, get more pressure to the front of your skis by trying to get your knees to touch your toes.  I know it isn't possible but is a directional goal or target.  The angle at the front of your ankle, back of the knee and front of the hip should be close to equal.  This should put your shin and spine parallel and femur perpendicular to them.  I hope that makes sense.

 

it also looks like your stance is a little wide; not a lot but could come in some.  Your feet should be no further apart than your hips.  This will help with your skis moving as a team too.  Your ankle, knees, and hip should be stacked.

 

the good news is you've done pretty good for teaching yourself.  You're maintaining control, are linking turns and can stop.  This isn't the easiest thing for people to pick up on their own.  Aside from the fact that I'm an instructor, I would urge you to take a lesson or two because you will have more of the mountain opened to you.  There is a big difference between getting down a trail and skiing it well.  This is a life long pursuit and the better your foundation skills, the more fun you will have.

 

keep at it and see if you can get someone else to video you showing your entire body.

 

have fun,

 

Ken

 

Thanks for your reply Ken.

 

I have also feelt miself that the weight of my body is too "back" sometimes, so I will work on trying to correct that.

I will also try to keep the skies more together next time, and I will try to get someone to record me so it will give a much better view on my skiing.

Im also planning to get some instructions but atm im a bit short on money, but when I can il try to take 2 hours or so, so I can get some help from the instructor.

Thanks again for the tips.

post #5 of 10

I agree with most of what L&AirC said except the stance width.  I feel like the stance width is pretty good for modern skiing.  It looks about hip width apart....maybe slightly wide.  But at this point of your development, trying to get your skis close together is not a good thing to focus on.  I think there are much more important factors. 

 

It really is hard to tell from the vantage point of the video, but here are a few cracks at it

 

You're not really turning much...just kind of slightly putting the skis at an angle to the fall line to slow down a bit while basically going straight down the hill.  If you imagine how far your body moves across the hill from turn to turn..how far is it? a few feet maybe?  I want you to try and practice finishing the turns so that your body moves 15+ ft across the hill on each turn.  Your skis should be pointed almost horizontal to the hill at the end of the turn and maybe your speed will be almost 0 by the end of the turn.  This is OK for now.  The turns don't even need to be linked.  But get used to really finishing the turn.  Don't try to turn fast...turn well.  Keep your body facing mostly downhill while doing this.

 

Another thing is to practice hockey stops...if you can, get a bit of speed at the bottom of each run and try to hockey stop.  Don't just slow down and then snowplow to a stop.

 

When turning, focus on putting pressure on the outside ski.  Don't lean into the turn.

 

Finally...get forward forward forward.....99 out of 100 skiers on the hill ski in the back seat.  If you think you're forward, you're probably still not forward.  Get your hands, and most importantly, your hips forward.  Most people will try to put their hands forward, but in doing so, end up sticking their butt out back...don't do that.

 

Get lessons if you can!  Good luck!

post #6 of 10
As the others noted, the videos are next to useless. For example, the fact one can see your toes may depend upon where the camera is????? Is it in your right hand ahead of your body or is it on your helmet?

I see no ski performance I'd want to have.

First get someone else to hold the camera.

No, wait, first, get some lessons. Being self-taught is like deciding to remove your own appendix. You may get over it, but it ain't going to be pretty.

THEN get someone else to hold the camera.
post #7 of 10

A bit harsh, Kneale?

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by majortato View Post

I agree with most of what L&AirC said except the stance width.  I feel like the stance width is pretty good for modern skiing.  It looks about hip width apart....maybe slightly wide.  But at this point of your development, trying to get your skis close together is not a good thing to focus on.  I think there are much more important factors. 

 

It really is hard to tell from the vantage point of the video, but here are a few cracks at it

 

You're not really turning much...just kind of slightly putting the skis at an angle to the fall line to slow down a bit while basically going straight down the hill.  If you imagine how far your body moves across the hill from turn to turn..how far is it? a few feet maybe?  I want you to try and practice finishing the turns so that your body moves 15+ ft across the hill on each turn.  Your skis should be pointed almost horizontal to the hill at the end of the turn and maybe your speed will be almost 0 by the end of the turn.  This is OK for now.  The turns don't even need to be linked.  But get used to really finishing the turn.  Don't try to turn fast...turn well.  Keep your body facing mostly downhill while doing this.

 

Another thing is to practice hockey stops...if you can, get a bit of speed at the bottom of each run and try to hockey stop.  Don't just slow down and then snowplow to a stop.

 

When turning, focus on putting pressure on the outside ski.  Don't lean into the turn.

 

Finally...get forward forward forward.....99 out of 100 skiers on the hill ski in the back seat.  If you think you're forward, you're probably still not forward.  Get your hands, and most importantly, your hips forward.  Most people will try to put their hands forward, but in doing so, end up sticking their butt out back...don't do that.

 

Get lessons if you can!  Good luck!

 

You know what?  I watched the videos on my PC monitor tonight (iPad in the morning) and I agree with majortato; you needn't worry about the width of you stance just yet.  Optical illusion on a smaller screen.  Nice camera by the way.  The video is very crisp.

 

I understand the concern on the cost of lessons.  There is lots of information here at epic to get you going though.

 

Here's one thing you can start applying;

 

Perpendicularity - An easy way to turn a ski is when it is flat and your weight is over your foot.  If on flat terrain, standing still, you stood on one ski and wiggled your toes side to side while in this position, your ski should do the same and it would make an impression in the snow looking like a bowtie; skinny in the middle where your foot is and wider at each end.  Your body would be perpendicular to the surface.  When you get on a slope, you need to be able to do the same thing (get the ski flat).  This means you must lean down the hill.  This is counter intuitive as we seek balance to the center of the earth and not the slope we're standing on (i.e. standing on a slope you will lean into the hill so you don't fall over.)

 

Keep having fun,

 

Ken

post #9 of 10

LOL, That's actually an interesting exercise just being able to look at the feet. I agree with Majorato about balance to the outside ski. What I saw is that when it apeared you were turning to the right that the right ski tracked and there is that little speed wobble in the left ski and vice versa. This tells me that your balance is over the opposite foot that it should be and likely as Majorato concluded you are leaning. To increase your ability to turn and tighten your arc try tapping the foot that is on the inside of the turn on the snow as you move through your arc. This will force you to make an adjustment to how you are standing over the skis. The goal is to have the movement come from joints in the leg without disrupting your balance in the upper body. Continued practice will enable you to begin tapping sooner and continue longer through the arc, potentially being able to ski only on one foot or the other albeit there are other things you could do while attaining that degree of proficency, it's something you can always come back to and improve as it's a core skill in skiing. Love to see more video.


Edited by pdxammo - 2/13/13 at 10:20am
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Don't worry guys, in the next 2 weeks sometime, im going to get someone to video me from the outside, so you can see everything perfectly, meanwhile if I go skiing few times before that, il try to work on what you guys are telling me.
 

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