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Skiing Mishaps

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

So we've all been on the hill when something unexpected happens, sometimes bad, sometimes good, but either way they usually make for some good stories. 

 

What are yours?

 

 

To start off, today at Stowe I decided to do a little "side country" since the whole resort was already tracked out from the recent storm.  The whole motivation behind doing so was to get some POV film for a movie I'm putting together. I flipped the camera on to capture some of the climb and apparently didn't hit the button hard enough to stop it... So after climbing, quite literally, with nothing but my skis and poles through 2-3ft of snow and buried trees for 45 minutes I finally get to my destination, only to realize that there was no memory left on my card! Well at least I got some nice fresh turns in...

 

 

 

This was also a day ruiner, not my car thank god!

post #2 of 14

Mine wasn't much compared to the flaming car.  Red Lodge Mountain got 18" last night so I headed up, along with half of Montana I guess.  I made a few runs and was skating/poling back to a lift when i realized that one pole didn't seems to be biting into the snow.  When I got to the lift I looked and the tip of one of my nearly new, bought them just before Christmas, Leki Peak Vario Trigger pole was gone.  I had been skiing almost nothing but powder, WTF?  I really like these things and will probably have to use a different pair for several weeks.

 

post #3 of 14

Is there something lurking in the snow in Montana that likes Leki Vario tips confused.gif

post #4 of 14

I went on an multi night Backcountry trip, hiked 6 miles up 4000 vertical spent the night, then summited the next morning only to find out on my first turn that my rear binding was COMPLETELY broken.  It would not hold my boot in at all, just walked out of it.   So I skied down on one leg, packed up and went home....    the end....   Nothing worse then spending the night in freezing temps and getting nothing out of it.....  

post #5 of 14

A few weeks ago we arrived at the mountain to find that I had forgotten our poles.

 

Not the biggest deal in the world overall, but the wife and I weren't happy.   Luckily we were able to make our way over to the rental shack and they borrowed us a pair for free.   Probably the last time I do that...   Wife asks me everytime if we have the poles now!  ;)

post #6 of 14

A few years ago while visiting Mt. Bachelor we were preparing to drive up to the mountain on time for first chair, about a 20 minute drive.  As we were getting ready, Terri's ski pants zipper died.  It wasn't fixable.  CRAP!  We had to go into town and wait for a place to open and then find some decent pants.  So, after the purchase we finally hit the road at about 10:30 with an ETA of about 11:00, two hours later than planned. 

 

As we got within sight of the mountain I realized that in our haste to get out of Dodge, I had forgotten to bring my parka and now it was too late to go back. It was really cold out and there was no way to ski without some kind of shell, so I used an old four button overcoat that was in the back of the car.  We scrounged up some safety pins to hold it together better. 

 

As we began skiing it became obvious that it was way too cold and I couldn't do without the plugs for my helmet that happened to be in the pocket of my parka back at the ranch.  We stopped at the lodge and took some paper napkins which I wadded up and stuffed into the holes in my helmet.  This worked like magic.  I skied the rest of the day wearing a brown overcoat with napkins hanging out of my helmet.  I'm sure that I was quite a sight, but the skiing was just fine.

post #7 of 14

In college one year, I got some nice new gear over christmas - new boots, jacket, gloves.  Had them in my ski bag right there by the garage while the car was warming up.  That's where they stayed all day unfortunately.  I realized it about 40 minutes into my hour long trip, and my buddies weren't going back.  So - I scrounged big time - got what I could from my buddies (which was little more than some crappy rain pants and the thinnest shell you ever saw) then hit up the lost and found for some mismatched gloves, rented boots and was on my way.  Must not have been a great day because that's all I remember about it.  Now, everytime I set out for the hill I say to myself "skis, boots, poles"....and continue on "wallet, keys, etc, etc.....

post #8 of 14

My truck is 2WD and I found out the hard way it can only take low profile chains.  I put on normal chains, all looks well, hit 25 MPH and start hearing SLAP SLAP SLAP.  I get out and both my rear plastic mud flaps are ripped off left down the highway somewhere and the wheel well is pretty bent up where they ripped off.  Thankfully I was able to make it up the hill without the chains that day and promptly ordered some low profile chains that work great.  Funny thing about this is I was up skiing on Saturday near the base area and I hear that familiar SLAP SLAP SLAP sound and what do you know its some idiot driving up the hill with the same truck as mine and ripped up fenders, he didn't stop and take his chains off like I did. roflmao.gif

post #9 of 14

Not really a mishap, but it could have been!!!

 

This weekend I was teaching a 6 year old boy how to ski, and he said, "I see something shiny"!  At first I thought, Oh great!  One of those kids!!!redface.gif.  Then I looked a little more closely, and discovered this with the blade sticking straight up out of the snow!eek.gif

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

A few years ago while visiting Mt. Bachelor we were preparing to drive up to the mountain on time for first chair, about a 20 minute drive.  As we were getting ready, Terri's ski pants zipper died.  It wasn't fixable.  CRAP!  We had to go into town and wait for a place to open and then find some decent pants.  So, after the purchase we finally hit the road at about 10:30 with an ETA of about 11:00, two hours later than planned. 

 

As we got within sight of the mountain I realized that in our haste to get out of Dodge, I had forgotten to bring my parka and now it was too late to go back. It was really cold out and there was no way to ski without some kind of shell, so I used an old four button overcoat that was in the back of the car.  We scrounged up some safety pins to hold it together better. 

 

As we began skiing it became obvious that it was way too cold and I couldn't do without the plugs for my helmet that happened to be in the pocket of my parka back at the ranch.  We stopped at the lodge and took some paper napkins which I wadded up and stuffed into the holes in my helmet.  This worked like magic.  I skied the rest of the day wearing a brown overcoat with napkins hanging out of my helmet.  I'm sure that I was quite a sight, but the skiing was just fine.

 

ROTFLMAOROTF.gif  What a great story.  Almost as good as the Hutterite girls I see at RLM wearing Carhartt jackets and ankle length skirts.

post #11 of 14

A few years ago some of the resort staff decided to hang out at the top of the mountain until dark, then ski down by the light of the full moon.

 

It had been a warm day, soft wet snow, and I had no trouble climbing up to join them on my cross country gear.

 

But during the time spent socializing and sipping from the warming flask, the forgiving snow turned to ice and frozen death cookies.

 

The journey down involved some of the ugliest survival skiing ever seen, except it wasn't seen, because it was dark.  Enhancing the experience was my choice of the shortest route - an ungroomed black run (too many sips from the flask?)

 

Never happier to be at the bottom.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stvbck View Post

A few years ago some of the resort staff decided to hang out at the top of the mountain until dark, then ski down by the light of the full moon.

 

It had been a warm day, soft wet snow, and I had no trouble climbing up to join them on my cross country gear.

 

But during the time spent socializing and sipping from the warming flask, the forgiving snow turned to ice and frozen death cookies.

 

The journey down involved some of the ugliest survival skiing ever seen, except it wasn't seen, because it was dark.  Enhancing the experience was my choice of the shortest route - an ungroomed black run (too many sips from the flask?)

 

Never happier to be at the bottom.

Survival skiing is definitely not my cup of tea either!

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by stvbck View Post

A few years ago some of the resort staff decided to hang out at the top of the mountain until dark, then ski down by the light of the full moon.

 

It had been a warm day, soft wet snow, and I had no trouble climbing up to join them on my cross country gear.

 

But during the time spent socializing and sipping from the warming flask, the forgiving snow turned to ice and frozen death cookies.

 

The journey down involved some of the ugliest survival skiing ever seen, except it wasn't seen, because it was dark.  Enhancing the experience was my choice of the shortest route - an ungroomed black run (too many sips from the flask?)

 

Never happier to be at the bottom.

the best powder I have ever skied was on top of loveland pass in the middle of the night, moonlight mania!!!   

post #14 of 14

I was on Ski Patrol at Stevens Pass in the 70s.  One year we hosted a regional competition where teams from ski areas throughout the region came to compete in things like toboggan course, orienteering, etc.  At the end of the competition our patrol put on a dinner for the team members at the warming hut at the top of Barrier Chair.  (Since then it has been replaced by Skyline, and the warming hut is gone.)  The regular patrol members like me were told that only the competitors could take part in the feast and we had to fend for ourselves.

 

The evening before the event there was a large snow storm that covered all of Western Washington all the way down to sea level.  The lowlands were buried in unexpected snow and the roads were awful, people were asked to stay at home.  We were already at the ski area so it didn't really have an unusual effect on our operations but few people actually made it to the hill. It turned out that no other teams besides the couple that Stevens entered showed up.  Their fees had been paid, so there was no problem but they weren't there to take part so it was kind of lonely for the Stevens teams.

 

At the end of my shift, about 5:00, I was stepping out of my skis at the ski patrol building when a patroller came out and asked me what I was doing.  Apparently the big ending feast had been paid for and prepared, but there was nobody to eat it since none of the teams showed up.  We were all invited to the warming hut to chow down for free!

 

Being a young man in my early 20s I was not about to turn down an offer of a free meal, so I clicked back in and made a beeline for the chair lift.  The food was really good (lots better than my usual TV dinner) and to top it off there were all the free drinks we wanted!  Well, I was not about to pass up such a fantastic offer and I imbibed freely.  When it was time to go I was experiencing some "minor" balance issues, but there was only one way down, at least in my foggy thought processes.  I was chagrined to note that I was in full Patrol uniform, crosses, fanny pack, radio and I had to ski down the mountain drunk as a skunk.  I remember looking straight ahead and praying that there would be no accidents along the way.  I had decided that I would have to ignore one if one appeared.  Luckily, none did.

 

This was the first and last time I ever skied drunk.  It was really stupid and I learned my lesson well.  Never again.


Edited by Posaune - 2/14/13 at 7:40am
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