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Born-again skier working on new skills

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I was 54 years of age and +\- 60 lbs overweight, but when the first flakes fell in November, I was touched by the spirit of Ullr, just as I was 40 years ago.

After 15 years absent the joy of sliding, I rediscovered  the wonder.

Ever since, I have been working hard on fitness (with some success, having dumped about half of the blubber), but I have a long way to go.

Every day on the slopes is an exercise in balance: reveling in the fun of skiing vs working on reclaiming form and learning new skills.

With an Eastern skiing background and some racing experience, I am more comfortable on the front side, so I am working on expanding my comfort zone by making a point of trying to ski more off-piste every day.

Having slept through the recent advances in ski design, I need to gear up.

Does it make sense to have a somewhat shorter bump ski in the quiver for days when I really want to work on moguls?

In the old days I skied 205s for slalom and powder days and 210s for GS and cruising the crud.

Yesterday I tried some E98s in a 180, which were a lot of fun, but it occurred to me that it might be easier, particularly in the tighter bumps to go to about a 170 (which are easy enough to try out).

Thoughts?

 

P.S. Forgive me for introducing an equipment issue in a general skiing thread, but it is also a question of skills development.

post #2 of 14

Welcome to EpicSki!  I got back into skiing 8 years ago when my daughter was old enough for ski school.  In my late 40's then . . . first learned in middle school.  The new equipment, both 4-buckle boots and shaped skis, made it a lot easier to improve once I was getting 15+ days on snow.

 

Even though you aren't exactly a beginner, might get some good ideas from this thread:

http://www.epicski.com/t/114722/tips-for-beginners-over-40-or-50-or

 

Where are you skiing?

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

I will hit the usual suspects, but Vail is pretty hard to beat (except for the $18 burger w/fries and the $25 parking fee).

I see you hail from Massanutten. I skied there the year it opened. It was a real step up from Bryce.

post #4 of 14

Lucky you to be starting up again in CO!  My trips out west are usually to Utah.

 

I'm not exactly local to Mnut since it's a 4-hour drive, but for me it's the best place within driving distance of Raleigh for assorted reasons.  A good friend grew up in northern VA, so he remembers the few runs Mnut had when it opened 40 years ago.  They made a lot of improvements to the ski hill in the last couple decades on the way to becoming a major 4-season timeshare resort.

 

What are you using for boots?  Meaning how old are they?  I had rear-entry boots from the 1990's when I started skiing more.  Updating to a 4-buckle boot from a boot fitter made a big difference.

 

Have you read the Epicski articles about buying equipment?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Streak View Post

I will hit the usual suspects, but Vail is pretty hard to beat (except for the $18 burger w/fries and the $25 parking fee).

I see you hail from Massanutten. I skied there the year it opened. It was a real step up from Bryce.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

I am on a pretty soft flexing Nordica that are about 6 or 7 years old. When I bought them, I had Surefoot make custom the foot beds.

Funny you should ask, I have an appointment with a boot fitter this afternoon.

Thinking about a pair of these, which got very good reviews in the wide-foot category. 

post #6 of 14

Blue,

 

I started skiing around 3 years old and it was a huge part of my life until I was 22. I raced and then I turned to freestyle. Aerials wasn't my thing, so I stuck with ballet/acro and moguls. Back then, I never counted the days I skied each year. But looking back, it was a minimum of 60 days a year. One year during college, a friend and I consciously set out for a 100 days and surpassed it. Otherwise, it was around 80 days. It's actually quite easy when you're going to school at the University of Utah and skiing at least 6 days a week. It didn't hurt when the University asks you to start a mogul course for their PE department. They wanted to pay me to ski bumps at Alta and give me a pass? Couldn't turn that offer up?

 

Graduate school and being part of the real world can take you away from the things you love. I'm 45 and just came back after more than a dozen year hiatus. Luckily, coming back was like riding a bike. The skills were there once I figured out the new skis. Just don't have the strength back yet.

 

I'll be the first to tell you that you don't use skiing to get fit--you must get fit to ski. With that in mind, skiing a step below your known abilities to stay safe and healthy is a great way to provide incentive for yourself. It would be nice in life if everyone could just be motivated to eat healthy and exercise since it is just good for you. But in reality, I do better when I have goals. Maybe it's the old athlete in me that was very goal-oriented that needs to drive towards something. I wouldn't let myself do certain things until I dropped to a specific weight or cycled a certain distance.

 

I love your "touched by the spirit of Ullr" and "Born-Again Skier" terminology. I guess skiing is the only place I get that "runner's high". (I've never understood that one since I've never seen a runner smile when running.) I was describing my obsession for moguls today and a friend called me an addict--it's true. For me, it's being high on life. I don't drink, I've never done drugs, but I do ski. For me, it's for physical, mental, and emotional health.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hey, thanks for the thoughtful reply.
You are right on so many things.
Nothing motivates like a great day on the slopes.
I was fortunate enough to enjoy a good afternoon at Vail today, skiing with a good friend and great skier,
My first western ski adventure was to Alta (38 years ago), and it will always be the seminal pilgrimage.
Epic snow? Oh yes! It was incredible.
Skills to match? Not so much.
But it was a magical time.
post #8 of 14

Now 60yrs old and have been in and out of sking since the late 60's.Most of the 70's and 80's I spent bombing on 190 SL type skis. Made my 1st reentry in 1998 and bought K2 Merlin IV at 193 lenth my 1st pair of the new shaped skis. Home Mt. Holiday Valley/Kissing Bridge.

 

In 2001 I moved to Richmond,VA skied Wintergreen,Massanutten,and SnowShoe a few time. In 2006 bought Volkl Supersport 6 S. Took them on a 10day trip to SteamBoat. They really didn't work well in the chamepaine powder out there. I really didn't ski much while living in VA.

 

Fast forward to today. Moved to Concord,Ma in Sept. I went to a local ski shop to up date my skis. I ended up on a set of Line Profit 90's. I've skied them about 10 times at Wachusetts and one day at Breton Woods NH

 

For those that are interested, here's my take. The P 90's are a good all mountain ski they are best in real snow with some depth to it. At Wachusetts I've been skiing mostly hard packed groomed, not sure what to call it, mostly machined man made  powder/corn etc. These arn't the best conditions for the P 90. The ski really doesn't edge all that well, compared to my 6 Stars or the K2 Merlin

 

This is in terms of the stif SL's that I've spent most of my yrs sking on. I unfortunatly gave my 6 stars to a friend and sort of wished I had them back. To that end I tracked down a pair of 5 Stars to use on those hard pack days.

 

My knees aren't in great shape so I'm spending a fair bit of time skiing the groomers while I get back in shape.

 

It feels great to be on the skis on a weekly basis again!

post #9 of 14

OffPeak:  Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm skiing at Massanutten and Wintergreen these days.  Know Concord well because I went to school at Concord Academy quite a while back.

 

Did you notice there is an EpicSki Gathering in Vermont in early March?

http://www.epicski.com/t/114012/2013-northern-vermont-gathering

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OffPeak View Post

Now 60yrs old and have been in and out of sking since the late 60's.Most of the 70's and 80's I spent bombing on 190 SL type skis. Made my 1st reentry in 1998 and bought K2 Merlin IV at 193 lenth my 1st pair of the new shaped skis. Home Mt. Holiday Valley/Kissing Bridge.

 

In 2001 I moved to Richmond,VA skied Wintergreen,Massanutten,and SnowShoe a few time. In 2006 bought Volkl Supersport 6 S. Took them on a 10day trip to SteamBoat. They really didn't work well in the chamepaine powder out there. I really didn't ski much while living in VA.

 

Fast forward to today. Moved to Concord,Ma in Sept. I went to a local ski shop to up date my skis. I ended up on a set of Line Profit 90's. I've skied them about 10 times at Wachusetts and one day at Breton Woods NH

 

For those that are interested, here's my take. The P 90's are a good all mountain ski they are best in real snow with some depth to it. At Wachusetts I've been skiing mostly hard packed groomed, not sure what to call it, mostly machined man made  powder/corn etc. These arn't the best conditions for the P 90. The ski really doesn't edge all that well, compared to my 6 Stars or the K2 Merlin

 

This is in terms of the stif SL's that I've spent most of my yrs sking on. I unfortunatly gave my 6 stars to a friend and sort of wished I had them back. To that end I tracked down a pair of 5 Stars to use on those hard pack days.

 

My knees aren't in great shape so I'm spending a fair bit of time skiing the groomers while I get back in shape.

 

It feels great to be on the skis on a weekly basis again!

post #10 of 14
Private ski lessons are the best
post #11 of 14
I too am just getting back into the sport. 39 now and just back on the slopes after a 20 year hiatus. My oldest who is 5 was my driving factor. I also have twin 3 year olds itching to learn. I wish I had not missed the past 20 years. Forgot how much fun it is. I ended up getting myself some Fischer Watea 84. Very fun ski. And man are boots more comfortable now. I was a pretty serious racer back in the day. I now just want to enjoy myself and have fun with my family. Good luck to you by the way.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

Update: I bought some new Rossignol Experience Sensor 110 boots, which are a big improvement. They still need some fine tuning, but they feel great!

I also scored a pair of 2012 Salomon Lords mounted with a set of 2012 Rossignol Axial II bindings at a second-hand store for $127.50! No kidding.

The edges were pretty rusty, but after a stone grind and a little hand tuning on my part, they look good.

Their maiden shred was 10-12" of fresh last week at Vail, and I have never had more fun on a pair of skis.

The moral of the story is that there has never been a better time to ski, and the journey back to the sport has been a tonic for an aging body and a tired spirit.

post #13 of 14

Way to go, Blue Streak!

post #14 of 14

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