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Revelation Bowl...can an advanced beginner handle?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Can an advanced beginner handle Revelation Bowl?  I've looked at numerous photos and videos, and it seems that taking Gold Hill and entering it from the side doesn't look all that daunting, especially on a powder day where it a little slower and a fall might not hurt as much.

 

In fact, in all the videos Ive seen the portin of See Forever from the Revelation lift down toward Gold Hill lift scares me more than Revelation Bowl itself.

 

I would LOVE to give this a shot one my trip in 3 weeks...but I'm sacred of the unknown and it is hard to judge from videos.

 

Has anyone ever gone down it wth a beginner or done it yourself?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 17
Yes assuming the light isn't flat and you are correct thr run down the ridge from the top of chair 15 will likely be harder for you than the main bowl shot off of 14.
post #3 of 17

Can you ski bushwacker or the plunge (when groomed)?

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by voriand View Post

Can you ski bushwacker or the plunge (when groomed)?

welp....I was planning on avoiding those runs on the Town side of the mountain, except for may telluride trail.  They just look too steep and too many edges and cliffs.

 

I know Revelation may be just as steep (although the lower entry point between Revelation and Gold Hill lift looks lees steep) but there are no cliffs or trees.  Also, a groomed run scares me more than a powdery one because its harder and faster.

 

So that's kinda what I was thinking.   Honestly, like i said, I'm more scared of the little traverse from the Revelation lift down see forever, which I would ultimately HAVE to come down even if I entered the Bowl from Gold Hill lift.  That section is too skinny and steep...it terrifies me just looking at pics.  I'd have to sideslip down the first part of that or even walk it.

 

Darn,I REALLY want to give it a shot but it looks like it might be a bad idea.

post #5 of 17

Curlydubs,

 

I responded to your other question about Telluride and will be happy to give my two cents here as well.

 

Please don't take this the wrong way...I would encourage you to work up to the point where you are not so afraid of speed and have the ability to carve good turns on steeper terrain before you venture into areas with powder or crud-like conditions.  One of the things that might be a great idea for you is to take a half-day (or full) of intermediate lessons where you can refine your form and increase your confidence.

 

Like a previous poster mentioned, you should first be able to ski down Bushwacker or Plunge when groomed.  Some of your comments don't make sense as the normal progression of skiing ability typically has a skier feeling a lot more comfortable on groomed runs, rather than those with powder.  Even though it has been a while since I skiied Telluride, here is how I would rank the difficulty of the individual trails (at least, those that I have been on), from easiest to more difficult:

 

  1. Meadows
  2. The Peaks
  3. Bridges
  4. Galloping Goose
  5. Double Cabin
  6. Village Bypass
  7. Cake Walk (mostly flat)
  8. Sundance
  9. Boomerang
  10. Telluride Trail
  11. Marmot
  12. Misty Maiden
  13. Butterfly
  14. Pick 'N Gad
  15. Dew Drop
  16. Polar Queen
  17. See Forever
  18. Ophir Loop
  19. Hermit
  20. Peekaboo
  21. Alta
  22. Humboldt Draw
  23. Silver Tip
  24. Smuggler
  25. Woozley's Way
  26. Lookout
  27. Plunge (when groomed)
  28. Bushwacker (when groomed)
  29. Coonskin
  30. Mammoth

 

Those should keep you busy.  I have not been to Telluride since Revelation Bowl has been opened so I do not have an opinion on it.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post

Curlydubs,

 

I responded to your other question about Telluride and will be happy to give my two cents here as well.

 

Please don't take this the wrong way...I would encourage you to work up to the point where you are not so afraid of speed and have the ability to carve good turns on steeper terrain before you venture into areas with powder or crud-like conditions.  One of the things that might be a great idea for you is to take a half-day (or full) of intermediate lessons where you can refine your form and increase your confidence.

 

Like a previous poster mentioned, you should first be able to ski down Bushwacker or Plunge when groomed.  Some of your comments don't make sense as the normal progression of skiing ability typically has a skier feeling a lot more comfortable on groomed runs, rather than those with powder.  Even though it has been a while since I skiied Telluride, here is how I would rank the difficulty of the individual trails (at least, those that I have been on), from easiest to more difficult:

 

  1. Meadows
  2. The Peaks
  3. Bridges
  4. Galloping Goose
  5. Double Cabin
  6. Village Bypass
  7. Cake Walk (mostly flat)
  8. Sundance
  9. Boomerang
  10. Telluride Trail
  11. Marmot
  12. Misty Maiden
  13. Butterfly
  14. Pick 'N Gad
  15. Dew Drop
  16. Polar Queen
  17. See Forever
  18. Ophir Loop
  19. Hermit
  20. Peekaboo
  21. Alta
  22. Humboldt Draw
  23. Silver Tip
  24. Smuggler
  25. Woozley's Way
  26. Lookout
  27. Plunge (when groomed)
  28. Bushwacker (when groomed)
  29. Coonskin
  30. Mammoth

 

Those should keep you busy.  I have not been to Telluride since Revelation Bowl has been opened so I do not have an opinion on it.

Awesome man, this is great info....thank you!

 

I hear what you are saying as far as the normal progression of things goes and that groomers are considered easier.  However, my biggest fear are steeps and speed, and basically the inability i would have to slow down on steeps.  I know powder can be challenging, but I feel like it would slow me down and allow me to sort of do that quick, back and forth hopping sort of thing with greater ease and less fear because it is bascially softer and thicker.  

 

However....I went to Canaan Valley, WV this weekend and I gotta say, it was a bit of a breakthrough for me.  I'm pretty excited.  We skied Timberline, WV on Friday and it was my first tme on skis since last March and was immediately bummed b/c I felt like my turning had regressed.  With my T-Ride trip looming I immediately began thinking that my terrain choices there were shrinking with the way I was skiing.   But I got back on track after a while, and by Sunday morning I was skiing several different blues at Canaan that would have TERRIFIED me last year.  I even skied a piece of a black at the bottom of a run.  It terrified me at first, but I just worked my turns, controlled speed and made it.  I found that I still had that fear standing on the edge of the run, but as soon as i dropped into it and successfully made my first turn....it was basically cake.  I just have to trust myself a little bit.  

 

So, not only did I feel great about that in and of itself, but I now feel that my world of possibilities at T-Ride opened up a bit.  I know I can do  See Forever now, at least the portion from the top of Apex lift.  I know I can handle Telluride Trail.  I know I can handle that first steep part on Stella.

 

I'm now thinking I should readjust my goal and maybe make it to ride up the Gold Hill lift and take a gander at Revelation Bowl.  Just kinda checking it out would be cool....the I can take see forever from there.

 

Anyhow.....departure is 10 days away and I am absolutely STOKED.  They are supposed to get another 2-3 feet by end of this weekend, too.  

 

I just can't wait!

post #7 of 17
Quote:

Can an advanced beginner handle Revelation Bowl?

...

I know powder can be challenging, but I feel like it would slow me down and allow me to sort of do that quick, back and forth hopping sort of thing with greater ease and less fear because it is bascially softer and thicker.  

 

 

Realize this is like a Doctor giving diagnosis over the Internet, not enough information on hand. But maybe you'll find some of this useful. smile.gif

 

Generally, advanced beginners suck at skiing powder. How are you defining powder? You are correct that powder can slow you down and makes speed control easier. However, powder skiing requires greater carving skills than skiing on a groomed run. In particular, proper turn initiation and lack of pronounced skidding and proper leg weighting (more advanced skills.) Also, ungroomed snow out West can get heavier due to sun exposure and above freezing temps. This type of snow is called crud, and is maybe the most difficult snow you can try to make a turn in. It may look like powder from a distance.

 

Quote:

However....I went to Canaan Valley, WV this weekend and I gotta say, it was a bit of a breakthrough for me.  I'm pretty excited.  We skied Timberline, WV on Friday and it was my first tme on skis since last March and was immediately bummed b/c I felt like my turning had regressed.  With my T-Ride trip looming I immediately began thinking that my terrain choices there were shrinking with the way I was skiing.   But I got back on track after a while, and by Sunday morning I was skiing several different blues at Canaan that would have TERRIFIED me last year.  I even skied a piece of a black at the bottom of a run.  It terrified me at first, but I just worked my turns, controlled speed and made it.  I found that I still had that fear standing on the edge of the run, but as soon as i dropped into it and successfully made my first turn....it was basically cake.  I just have to trust myself a little bit.

 

I'm a season's pass holder at Timberline and I ski Canaan Valley a bit. What trails at Timberline caused you problems? What lower section of a black did you ski at Canaan?

 

I don't know Telluride, but I've skied a lot out West.

 

Congrats on making a breakthrough at CV, keep it going. But given what you've posted, you may be trying to take too big a jump.
 

post #8 of 17

So I haven't been to Telluride but I saw that you kept mentioning that you thought powder would make things easier. It does in a way mentally but it also creates a lot of problems. Deep powder like anything over 12" or so starts necessitating that you ski steeper terrain and at higher speeds or you simply won't move or be able to turn. Also once terrain starts getting skied out it becomes very difficult ski as you start constantly accelerating and slowing down.

 

Now that's not to discourage it's just that as much fun as powder can be it's actually quite difficult to ski. You will crash constantly (I still do), so don't get disheartened. You will question why people like it so much and you will get stuck in a flat section that requires so miserable hiking. It's all part of the experience :) and if you are lucky enough to start being able to ski a couple times a season you will get better.

 

I don't know if you have ever tried snowboarding but learning powder is very similar lots of crashes and frustration the  first few times and then it'll click and be a blast.  

post #9 of 17
This sounds like a bad idea.
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL View Post

 

I'm a season's pass holder at Timberline and I ski Canaan Valley a bit. What trails at Timberline caused you problems? What lower section of a black did you ski at Canaan?

 

I don't know Telluride, but I've skied a lot out West.

 

Congrats on making a breakthrough at CV, keep it going. But given what you've posted, you may be trying to take too big a jump.
 

 

I was running mostly on Valley Vista from the midstation, which didnt really scare me at all.  The challenge was the black that it turns into....Face.  I didn't know it was a black at the time....but that last part was pretty darn steep for me.  But I entered it slwly and just did my turns and it worked.  After 2-3 times I was really getting the hang of it.

 

However, while riding up the lift I kept eyeing upper canaan curve and the the runs that drop off it like chute.  They looked scary, but I felt like they were doable.  Finally got up the courage....although i did skip chute and ran down to ski daddler, then snofield, then face again.  It was great.  I paused for a moment at the top of ski daddler and had a real moment of regret.  But I also could see that after that initial steep part it flattened out a bit....so I dove in quick and it was no problem.

 

I also see what people are saying about powder.  I like it, but it does change your speed and can cause a lack of control/slipping.  I almost ate it on the northern side of valley vista last weekend where there was about 6-8 inches of some untracked powder.  It was tough, but i like it.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

This sounds like a bad idea.

ha!  I think you're right.....its more a dream than anything.  I'll tell you what though, NEXT time I'm in Tride I'm going down into that bowl come hell or highwater.

 

What I'm going to do is ride the gold hill lift and just cjheck it out with my own eyes (never really seen a ski bowl like that in person) and then just run down see forever, which after this past weekend i know i can handle.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

So I haven't been to Telluride but I saw that you kept mentioning that you thought powder would make things easier. It does in a way mentally but it also creates a lot of problems. Deep powder like anything over 12" or so starts necessitating that you ski steeper terrain and at higher speeds or you simply won't move or be able to turn. Also once terrain starts getting skied out it becomes very difficult ski as you start constantly accelerating and slowing down.

 

Now that's not to discourage it's just that as much fun as powder can be it's actually quite difficult to ski. You will crash constantly (I still do), so don't get disheartened. You will question why people like it so much and you will get stuck in a flat section that requires so miserable hiking. It's all part of the experience :) and if you are lucky enough to start being able to ski a couple times a season you will get better.

 

I don't know if you have ever tried snowboarding but learning powder is very similar lots of crashes and frustration the  first few times and then it'll click and be a blast.  

Have tried it yet but I definitely want to.  I'm trying to ski as much as possibl;e and really expect to make some progress after 4 days at TRide.

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

and by the way, regarding Canaan Valley....LOVED the place and Timber Trail has got to be the best beginner trail on the east coast, or one of them.  totally awesome.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by curlydubs View Post

I was running mostly on Valley Vista from the midstation, which didnt really scare me at all.  The challenge was the black that it turns into....Face.  I didn't know it was a black at the time....but that last part was pretty darn steep for me.  But I entered it slwly and just did my turns and it worked.  After 2-3 times I was really getting the hang of it.

However, while riding up the lift I kept eyeing upper canaan curve and the the runs that drop off it like chute.  They looked scary, but I felt like they were doable.  Finally got up the courage....although i did skip chute and ran down to ski daddler, then snofield, then face again.  It was great.  I paused for a moment at the top of ski daddler and had a real moment of regret.  But I also could see that after that initial steep part it flattened out a bit....so I dove in quick and it was no problem.

I also see what people are saying about powder.  I like it, but it does change your speed and can cause a lack of control/slipping.  I almost ate it on the northern side of valley vista last weekend where there was about 6-8 inches of some untracked powder.  It was tough, but i like it.

Canaan is a great area and a great place for you to develop the skills to handle terrain like Revelation Bowl (in a safe manner.)

Knowing the trails you mentioned, you are not ready for Revelation Bowl (by a large margin.) The entire Valley Vista/Face/Canaan Cuve is a green run @ Snowbird. An open single black bowl out west is much steeper than those runs.

Timberline has an outstanding ski school. A few lessons there will greatly help to advance your progress. I'm the ambassador for both TL and CV. PM me if you have any questions about their ski schools.
post #15 of 17

Yes, the easy way to answer this question is to get a lesson and tell your instructor what you want to ski. If s/he is any good they won't take you anywhere you can't handle. This is one of the main benefits of doing lessons in my opinion. 

 

Have fun!

post #16 of 17

I agree with JohnL on the steepness of The Face and Vista View.  The Face would be a moderate blue out West.  Skiing powder you also should have good parallel skiing technique.  In powder you're skiing in the snow, not on it, so any irregularities in stance and balance are less forgiven compared to skiing groomed runs.  Non-parallel skis will continue in the direction of travel; i.e. you will do a face plant.

 

The below website can sometimes be helpful in making decisions on where to ski and the relative challenge of the slopes.

 

http://3dskimaps.com/telluride/

 

 

Having said all this, congratulations on the progress you are making.  Canaan Valley was my "breakthrough" ski resort 35 years ago.  What helped me most was being able to ski three days in a row, and 30+ inches of snow over those three days in mid-March.  We may be lucky and get a dump yet before Canaan closes in a few weeks, so you may have a chance to refine that powder skiing closer to home.

post #17 of 17

Bees Run, skiers right in Revelation Bowl is named after an elderly woman (in her 80's) who I met skiing the Plunge last week. Your not going to be out skied by an 80 year old woman are you?

 

The middle of Revalation Bowl is a steepish groomer. If you are having problems off piste, stick to the middle. That said, if you can't ski the groomed middle, you will have difficulty getting back from up there and really shouldn't be up there.

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