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Skiing rutted, see-saw "bumps"

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Anyone have tactical approaches to ski see-saw bumps? I'm talking about those "bumps" with flat (rather than curved) shoulders culminating in a point or ridge, and they're usually "long" bumps rather than circular. Often they form in steeper treed runs. They also tend to cluster tightly beside each other, resulting in abrupt troughs with no curvature (think of a sawblade). Some tactics that don't seem to work effectively include skiing the green line(the green line in this case feels more like a side slip, and often the lip up to the next peak is pretty gnarly), driving tips into the bumps (too abrupt of a trough)... 

post #2 of 9
Jump over the trough
post #3 of 9

Once tactic,

Ski the sides of the bumps. Reach for the sides of the bumps in the apex of the turn and use this time to shape and steer the feet across the fall line. absorb the oncoming bump (retract) and as you pass over the ridge, drive the tips down (not all the way into the trough but enough to get your body and COM to move in front of your feet) The retraction can be also used as an edge change, and then reach out to the next bump turn on/against the side of that one. Lots of scrubbing of speed while shaping the turns helps. A blocking pole plant, followed by a driving the hand down the hill with that hand also helps with controlling the upper body from flailing around and getting in the back seat.

 

I usually try first to ski them as "slowly as possible" almost like doing a slow dog noodle down the hill. Then slowly pick up the pace as you develop some rhythm.

 

One wise mentor once told me to "ski to the light" as in "ski on the lit areas of the snow", avoid the dark areas. The above tactic does this.. (of course it only works if there is enough strong light to cast shadows). if the light is very flat or straight over head, this "ski to the light" doesn't quite work.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Anyone have tactical approaches to ski see-saw bumps? I'm talking about those "bumps" with flat (rather than curved) shoulders culminating in a point or ridge, and they're usually "long" bumps rather than circular. Often they form in steeper treed runs. They also tend to cluster tightly beside each other, resulting in abrupt troughs with no curvature (think of a sawblade). Some tactics that don't seem to work effectively include skiing the green line(the green line in this case feels more like a side slip, and often the lip up to the next peak is pretty gnarly), driving tips into the bumps (too abrupt of a trough)... 

Not really.  If you are referring to the bumps I think you are...like we used to get under "Sky Chair" (I think that is what it used to be called)...there really is no smooth technical way to ski them.  The bumps are formed by 1000s of sideslippers, boarders, and just general chaos.  They will always be a rough ride.

 

The best advice, is just to ski them agressivley.  Rod9301 was right, expect lots of air, dont expect to have a lot of rythm, be tactical and use a variety of turn shapes to try and avoid the crap where ever possible.

 

They wont test you on these types of bumps for L3.

post #5 of 9

+ 2 to skiing across the ruts and over the bumps instead of in the ruts and around the bumps. 

 

These ruts get formed by most of the people traversing across the run back and forth edge of trail all the way across to the other edge of the trail instead of linking turns down the fall line.  That leaves kind of an irregular argyle pattern of deep icy ruts. There aren't many, if any good lines to ski down that.

post #6 of 9
Some call those bumps 'canoes'. One of my mentors says, "you wouldn't attack an elephant from the front."
post #7 of 9

My whole thing in the bumps is to try to be smooth, and as much as I'd like to think I can handle every bump, the truth is that some bumps can definitely end up being such a drop off that it is impossible to be smooth over them.  I try to extend (or absorb depending on where exactly the 'wall' is) as quickly as I possibly can.  Usually I see more drop offs on the downhill sides than straight up walls on the uphill side of bumps.  I'm not sure I remember many bumps in recent years that I couldn't absorb the uphill side on.  The more abrupt it is, the more quickly I pull up my feet with my ab's or whatever.  If there ever was an ice cube shaped one that had a straight up wall on the uphill side, I suppose I would jump over the wall onto the top of the bump.  You could always just go around it or something too : )  Earlier this year there was a run I was on that was so rutted out due to lack of snow that I cut out of it because I was afraid my skis would break.  I hope this applies somewhat to the bumps that you're talking about. 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Anyone have tactical approaches to ski see-saw bumps? I'm talking about those "bumps" with flat (rather than curved) shoulders culminating in a point or ridge, and they're usually "long" bumps rather than circular. Often they form in steeper treed runs. They also tend to cluster tightly beside each other, resulting in abrupt troughs with no curvature (think of a sawblade). Some tactics that don't seem to work effectively include skiing the green line(the green line in this case feels more like a side slip, and often the lip up to the next peak is pretty gnarly), driving tips into the bumps (too abrupt of a trough)... 

 

I call these "banana bumps" because each bump is shaped like a banana lodged in the snow.  They are lined up facing downhill close beside each other, their humped backs sticking up out of the snow.  The troughs are long and thin and point downhill too.  

 

The only line to ski them seems to be an almost straight run down a trough, with skis tipped quickly up onto its alternating shoulders.

 

Have I got this right, Metaphor?

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Lots of good tactics here. 

 

In a professional development day today, our course conductor brought us into some see-saw bumps. His tactical suggestion was to avoid riding up onto the "teeth" (tops); instead ski the sidewalls where possible. I believe he also recommended staying out of the troughs where possible as well. (not much of the bump left to ski... lol.) These weren't quite the same tightness of truly nasty seesaw bumps, but the tactic is still valid. 

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