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I wonder if this is being used WC skis yet?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

post #2 of 23

that coating would probably last on skis for about 30 seconds before it's completely rubbed off by the snow when skiing.

post #3 of 23

It wears off quickly due to abrasion
 

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwiski View Post

It wears off quickly due to abrasion

You guys know this ... how? How do you see it being fundamentally different from fluorocarbon waxes and coatings being applied and corked in on World Cup skis, as far as wear and durability and abrasion are concerned?

It's an interesting ad, and I maintain a healthy skepticism too, but I would not make a claim like that without citing some real evidence.

Best regards,
Bob
post #5 of 23

Even if it doesn't work on ski bases, I wouldn't mind having a pair of ski gloves coated with that stuff. 

post #6 of 23

Would it work on a dog? biggrin.gif

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroGravity View Post

Would it work on a dog? biggrin.gif

Could be that you may have a "N"ever dry wet dog smell ! roflmao.gif

post #8 of 23

Their instructional video has some more information, such as saying that abrasion can reduce performance.  It's supposed to withstand 30 below zero, so it might keep snow from sticking to things like crampons or snowshoes.  Interesting stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ord6dTARWfo
 

post #9 of 23
The stuff is $53 per quart and on some materials purportedly lasts for years. Someone could paint it into some old skis and see what happens. I'd be happy if the stuff keeps snow off the bottoms of my boots and off my bindings, keeps mold from growing in a shower, etc. no snow on the bottom of biots and sticking to bindings equates to safer binding releases and skiing, If you paint it into grout and don't need harsh chemicals to clean it, that would be a plus and potential cost savings.
Edited by quant2325 - 2/11/13 at 7:14am
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

The stuff is $53 per quart and on some materials purportedly lasts for years. Someone could paint it into some old skis and see what happens. I'd be happy if the stuff keeps snow off the bottoms of my boots and off my bindings, keeps mold from growing in a shower, etc. no snow on the bottom of biots and sticking to bindings equates tomsafer skiing, If you paint it into grout and don't need harsh chemicals to clean it, that would be a plus and potential cost savings.

 

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post


That is funny. I guess they should have named it "Sled Wax," with special packaging for snow sports. WTH, I may buy a quart today.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroGravity View Post

Would it work on a dog? biggrin.gif
LOL!
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 

 

 

Best scene in the entire movie. Makes me cry I laugh so hard, especially the sparks going across the parking lot

post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 

lol. Christmas Vacation was the first thing I thought of too when I saw the video. It would probably also work well as a non-nutritive cereal varnish...

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post


You guys know this ... how? How do you see it being fundamentally different from fluorocarbon waxes and coatings being applied and corked in on World Cup skis, as far as wear and durability and abrasion are concerned?

It's an interesting ad, and I maintain a healthy skepticism too, but I would not make a claim like that without citing some real evidence.

Best regards,
Bob

 


It works differently than waxes.  Waxes are absorbed by the micro-pores in the bases.  Skiing friction is generally caused by electromagnetic (static electricity) forces and chemical bonds.  The hydrocarbon and flourocarbon in waxes do not react with water molecules and so it reduces the chemical friction.  Certain aspects of wax and proper brushing helps reduce electromagnetic friction.

 

The nano-coating in this video is hydrophobic because of a nanostructure that it creates.  Basically, at a microscopic level, it forms a surface that is full of "hairs" and makes it so water cannot bond to it by reducing the amount of water that can come into contact with the surface it's adhered to.  On a ski though, these nano-hairs would quickly get destroyed by the abrasive snow.

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by majortato View Post

that coating would probably last on skis for about 30 seconds before it's completely rubbed off by the snow when skiing.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by majortato View Post

 


It works differently than waxes.  Waxes are absorbed by the micro-pores in the bases.  Skiing friction is generally caused by electromagnetic (static electricity) forces and chemical bonds.  The hydrocarbon and flourocarbon in waxes do not react with water molecules and so it reduces the chemical friction.  Certain aspects of wax and proper brushing helps reduce electromagnetic friction.

 

The nano-coating in this video is hydrophobic because of a nanostructure that it creates.  Basically, at a microscopic level, it forms a surface that is full of "hairs" and makes it so water cannot bond to it by reducing the amount of water that can come into contact with the surface it's adhered to.  On a ski though, these nano-hairs would quickly get destroyed by the abrasive snow.

Thanks for the explanation...I did poorly in science.  30 seconds--even 5 seconds at the start of a DH-- is a very long time at the start of a ski race, but I guess we have no idea right now if it could work as an overlay.  How long do you think this stuff will last on the bottom of a ski boot or on a fabric (e.g., a ski glove)?  The demo videos look cool, but there nothing to promote how durable it is.

post #17 of 23

The problem is after the stuff wears off, where does that leave the bases?  Because the coating doesn't necessarily 'wear off' completely.  Rather the nano structure is destroyed.  So now you might end up with all these hairs and debris clogging up the base structure.  The ski base and wax won't work effectively....so maybe you could gain a few tenths at first, but lose a lot more time after that.

post #18 of 23
post #19 of 23

So who is gunna try it on their skis first?

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post


You guys know this ... how? How do you see it being fundamentally different from fluorocarbon waxes and coatings being applied and corked in on World Cup skis, as far as wear and durability and abrasion are concerned?

It's an interesting ad, and I maintain a healthy skepticism too, but I would not make a claim like that without citing some real evidence.

Best regards,
Bob


People know this because this has been posted/discussed to death on other sites.

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

So who is gunna try it on their skis first?


I tried it.  It was a total disaster.  It repels water TOO well.  The bases (AND EDGES) floated an inch or two above the surface.  As a result there was no ability to get any edge contact and control my direction, much less my speed.  On the bright side, my 64mm underfoot SL skis floated ABOVE the bottomless powder way better than any fat skis ever made do.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


I tried it.  It was a total disaster.  It repels water TOO well.  The bases (AND EDGES) floated an inch or two above the surface.  As a result there was no ability to get any edge contact and control my direction, much less my speed.  On the bright side, my 64mm underfoot SL skis floated ABOVE the bottomless powder way better than any fat skis ever made do.

 

That made me laugh. Maybe if you just put it a strip in the center? Also how long did it last, was it only for a short while like some others thought?
post #23 of 23

Someone should try it on water skis. It'd be like Jesus skis

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