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knee bindings - Page 2

post #31 of 79

That's cause the Chairman was at the boot pro. That's about as far as I'll go on that one. Last year the Mt. had 20 pairs for tryouts. I guess that's over.

post #32 of 79

I've posted this before, but I will post it again.

 

I toasted my ACL on a pair of 194 Faction Thirteens with Salomon s916s and Atomic M110s.  The bindings were set at 13.  Forward pressure and wings and toe height were all set properly.  But in an attempt to gain more volume in my boots, I was skiing without footbeds that day.  Which gave a strange floaty feeling in the boots.  That caused the crash in which I hyper-extended my knee and tore my ACL.

 

Sure, if the bindings were set lower, I probably would have come out of them.  But they didn't cause the crash.

 

I still ski 916s.  Several pairs of them.  But know I ski them at 11/12 and have not had an issue, even in some pretty horrific crashes.

post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

The guy's at the Boot Pro told me that one of the regular's had all the old bindings removed and had these put on all he and his wifes skis.

 




And did he tell you if he LIKED his wife or not?
post #34 of 79

Funny, good one. :)

post #35 of 79

My biggest concern is the developer (ie true knowledge base) of the Kneebinding  is no longer with the company, the only thing new I've seen is new colors.

 

Makes me wonder.

post #36 of 79

I just switched to knee bindings this year from Look Pivots. I notice that most Knee customers have had ACL scares or tears before; in my case I have two artificial knees, still insist on skiing 40+ days a year because I must, but know another bad pre-release or non-release could easily end skiing for me. So a set of Knee Carbon bindings went on my new 180 Blizzard Bonafides this fall, good insurance I thought.

 

All thoughts of it being a safety binding went away once I had the Bones up to speed.  It's a performance binding that happens to sport lateral heel release.  From the solid CLUNK they make when you lock in to the bombproof hold-down until you want out, it's the sturdiest binding I've skied.   No release yet, and I've been out several days on a mix of early season snow, mostly railing groomers. but with a foray or two into some bumps, boilerplate and unkempt snow. On edge, the high binding stand height powers the ski like a GS race plate when carving, and they lost no quickness when I tossed a few rotary turns in for good measure. The whole package just felt solid. How much of that was the three sheets of metal in the Bonafides, and how much the made-in-USA muscle car feel of the Knee Carbons? Dunno, but I got these pups up to barking speed and felt secure doing it, at DIN 7 (190 lb guy).

 

All that made me look at the turntable bindings on my other skis, put in the boot on the bench, and feel how much heel slop they permit (properly adjusted) by comparison to the Knee bindings.  Ouch! Did I really like those for decades?  As an engineer, I'm impressed with Knee's build quality, and solid is something you can feel skiing.

 

PS I'll update my post if and once they release... 


Edited by AlpineImages - 1/26/17 at 2:35am
post #37 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
I'll trust the engineers on this one.

Being an engineer myself, I can relate.  The problem is that one of the engineers, and in my opinion a very good one (my qualifications as an expert witness in this opinion are a P. Eng. and a B.Sc, M.Sc and Ph.D. in civil engineering), has been gagged by the courts from talking about the bindings.  

 

I'll stick with the top of the line Tyrolia racing binding for now.

post #38 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineImages View Post
 

I just switched to knee bindings this year from Look Pivots. I notice that most Knee customers have had ACL scares or tears before; in my case I have two artificial knees, still insist on skiing 40+ days a year because I must, but know another bad pre-release or non-release could easily end skiing for me. So to show some maturity, a set of Knee Carbon bindings went on my new pair of 180 Blizzard Bonafides this fall, good insurance.

 

All thoughts of it being a safety binding went away once I had the Bones up to speed.  It's a performance binding that happens to sport lateral heel release.  From the solid CLUNK they make when you lock in to the bombproof hold-down until you want out, it's the sturdiest binding I've skied.   No release yet, and I've been out several days on a mix of early season snow, mostly railing groomers. but with a foray or two into some bumps, boilerplate and unkempt snow. On edge, the high binding stand height powers the ski like a GS race plate when carving, and they lost no quickness when I tossed a few rotary turns in for good measure. The whole package just felt solid. How much of that was the three sheets of metal in the Bonafides, and how much the made-in-USA muscle car feel of the Knee Carbons? Dunno, but I got these pups up to barking speed and felt secure doing it, at DIN 7 (190 lb guy).

 

All that made me look at the turntable bindings on my other skis, put in the boot on the bench, and feel how much heel slop they permit (properly adjusted) by comparison to the Knee bindings.  Ouch! Did I really like those for decades?  As an engineer, I'm impressed with Knee's build quality, and solid is something you can feel skiing.

 

PS I'll update my post if and once they release... 

Maturity?

Forgive my skepticism, but when someone's first post is an endorsement of a product I have to ask--do you have any connection to the product? (BTW-I have no opinion on knee binding one way or the other.)

post #39 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Maturity?
Forgive my skepticism, but when someone's first post is an endorsement of a product I have to ask--do you have any connection to the product? (BTW-I have no opinion on knee binding one way or the other.)
you don't have to ask, pretty clear this is marketing material from knee binding.
post #40 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineImages View Post
 

I just switched to knee bindings this year from Look Pivots. I notice that most Knee customers have had ACL scares or tears before; in my case I have two artificial knees, still insist on skiing 40+ days a year because I must, but know another bad pre-release or non-release could easily end skiing for me. So to show some maturity, a set of Knee Carbon bindings went on my new pair of 180 Blizzard Bonafides this fall, good insurance.

 

All thoughts of it being a safety binding went away once I had the Bones up to speed.  It's a performance binding that happens to sport lateral heel release.  From the solid CLUNK they make when you lock in to the bombproof hold-down until you want out, it's the sturdiest binding I've skied.   No release yet, and I've been out several days on a mix of early season snow, mostly railing groomers. but with a foray or two into some bumps, boilerplate and unkempt snow. On edge, the high binding stand height powers the ski like a GS race plate when carving, and they lost no quickness when I tossed a few rotary turns in for good measure. The whole package just felt solid. How much of that was the three sheets of metal in the Bonafides, and how much the made-in-USA muscle car feel of the Knee Carbons? Dunno, but I got these pups up to barking speed and felt secure doing it, at DIN 7 (190 lb guy).

 

All that made me look at the turntable bindings on my other skis, put in the boot on the bench, and feel how much heel slop they permit (properly adjusted) by comparison to the Knee bindings.  Ouch! Did I really like those for decades?  As an engineer, I'm impressed with Knee's build quality, and solid is something you can feel skiing.

 

PS I'll update my post if and once they release... 

Maturity?

Forgive my skepticism, but when someone's first post is an endorsement of a product I have to ask--do you have any connection to the product? (BTW-I have no opinion on knee binding one way or the other.)


Hm. Could be. On the other hand, I'd have expected to hear something about the time the binding released during a phantom foot incident.  People who buy the thing get excited about it — seems like a logical development in bindings.

 

I'm neutral, myself. My wife bought a pair and likes them (weight aside), but she's no shredder. People's question about this binding has to do with the fact that they're not TUV certified — there's no data on the force it takes to break an ACL the way there is on bones.  And if the DIN is set low enough to avoid an ACL injury, what's the chance of prerelease?

 

Most of the data is anecdotal at this point. The one ACL incident we know of (here) was by a woman who landed a jump wrong. It wasn't a phantom foot deal, so it's not something the binding is designed to mitigate. Even Rick Howell, the design engineer who's involved in a lawsuit with KB after being forced out, would agree.

post #41 of 79

Not sure about the maturity remark; I'm 59 and have been skiing 45 years.  As to why my first post was enthusiasm about new equipment, some explanation is in order.  I reviewed these bindings quite a bit before deciding on them, but found many old threads and little current feedback from skiers.  Most articles were from folks debating the product's claims and engineering. But I found few that were from skiers telling me how they worked while SKIING.

 

So I took a chance on these, liked them, and decided this was a good forum to share my observations: thus far the Knee's seem rock solid and safe. 

 

And no doubt, one's first post on any blog has to start somewhere. In many other forums, I enjoy blasting products that are designed to break or wear out, difficult to fix, or just plain vaporware. In this case, so far I really like these bindings. 

post #42 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineImages View Post
 

Not sure about the maturity remark; I'm 59 and have been skiing 45 years.  As to why my first post was enthusiasm about new equipment, some explanation is in order.  I reviewed these bindings quite a bit before deciding on them, but found many old threads and little current feedback from skiers.  Most articles were from folks debating the product's claims and engineering. But I found few that were from skiers telling me how they worked while SKIING.

 

So I took a chance on these, liked them, and decided this was a good forum to share my observations: thus far the Knee's seem rock solid and safe. 

 

And no doubt, one's first post on any blog has to start somewhere. In many other forums, I enjoy blasting products that are designed to break or wear out, difficult to fix, or just plain vaporware. In this case, so far I really like these bindings. 


Sorry Alpineimages, you walked into a minefield. The topic's pretty controversial here, as I'm sure you know from other threads. People get skeptical fast.

post #43 of 79

Thanks, Ghost.  Your street cred outranks me; I'm just an EE and CEM, and the EE part is growing some mold. But I've played fail mode analyst at nuclear facilities, turned a wrench for 40+ years, mounted lots of bindings in that time, and have learned to sense good build quality.  Purely from a handling standpoint, these bindings feel stouter than anything I've been on save a late 80's Geze race binding. But I'm open minded, do know that a rift between the designer and the company owner exists, but unless I hear him tell me that he thinks his design unsafe, I can only evaluate how they ski and how they hold up.  You are also welcome to clue me in, as I suspect you've evaluated these yourself.

 

My only question of the engineer thus far is why the force needed to open the heel is so high. 

post #44 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineImages View Post
But I'm open minded, do know that a rift between the designer and the company owner exists, but unless I hear him tell me that he thinks his design unsafe, I can only evaluate how they ski and how they hold up. 

 

I believe the designer made that claim, though I'm not going back to that thread to verify it. A very, very long thread.

post #45 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineImages View Post
 

I just switched to knee bindings this year from Look Pivots. I notice that most Knee customers have had ACL scares or tears before; in my case I have two artificial knees, still insist on skiing 40+ days a year because I must, but know another bad pre-release or non-release could easily end skiing for me. So to show some maturity, a set of Knee Carbon bindings went on my new pair of 180 Blizzard Bonafides this fall, good insurance.

 

All thoughts of it being a safety binding went away once I had the Bones up to speed.  It's a performance binding that happens to sport lateral heel release.  From the solid CLUNK they make when you lock in to the bombproof hold-down until you want out, it's the sturdiest binding I've skied.   No release yet, and I've been out several days on a mix of early season snow, mostly railing groomers. but with a foray or two into some bumps, boilerplate and unkempt snow. On edge, the high binding stand height powers the ski like a GS race plate when carving, and they lost no quickness when I tossed a few rotary turns in for good measure. The whole package just felt solid. How much of that was the three sheets of metal in the Bonafides, and how much the made-in-USA muscle car feel of the Knee Carbons? Dunno, but I got these pups up to barking speed and felt secure doing it, at DIN 7 (190 lb guy).

 

All that made me look at the turntable bindings on my other skis, put in the boot on the bench, and feel how much heel slop they permit (properly adjusted) by comparison to the Knee bindings.  Ouch! Did I really like those for decades?  As an engineer, I'm impressed with Knee's build quality, and solid is something you can feel skiing.

 

PS I'll update my post if and once they release... 

 

I have a local ski maker friend that I really trust who first told me about how much he liked these a few years back, and sold me on the theory of the lateral heel release.  When I next needed bindings I started reading a little about them and found very mixed reviews, and a lot of stories about poorly timed ejections.  I discussed these with my friend, who has quite a lot of experience mounting them, and he basically said they are a little more difficult to mount, but if the person mounting them knows what they are doing they shouldn't have problems.  I happened to run into him on the hill and he easily out-skied me in his, so I got a pair and had him mount them and they have been very solid since.  I can't say that they work any better than any of my other bindings (I, luckily, haven't had the opportunity to test the lateral heel release specifically), but they certainly perform no worse to date.  I've ridden ~25 days on them so far.  They are on fat powder skis.

post #46 of 79

Please don't let this thread turn ugly, please don't let this thread turn ugly, please don't let this thread turn ugly........

post #47 of 79

Update.

 

I told the few followers of this thread I'd report back once I had a release, either needed or pre-release.  Unfortunately, neither has occurred yet.  Ten days in on these skis / bindings, and I've flopped over in the trees twice thus far, but no drama yet.  They remain reassuringly solid and unsexy.  And my knees are still intact.

 

No drama is a good thing, which our moderator was hoping for.

 

But it's been dumping here, we're off tomorrow for Vail, so I'm back on the Line Bacons and Look Pivots for now.  Deep snow rules!

post #48 of 79

New time poster so I know I some won't take me seriously. I've read the forum for years but never had anything to say till now. I skied one pair of Knee Bindings on one of my skis for 3 seasons roughly about 100 days on those bindings. I liked but didn't love the performance of them, when they were able to perform. To back up a little, I am a 200 lb gorilla that can throw my weight around like the best of them. I ski mostly lower VT NH and NY. I had the bindings (Knee Core) center mounted on 183 4frnt Click skis. The skis are an extremely soft ski that helped me make the mountain my playground.

 

They obviously sit higher than most bindings which didn't take too much to get used to. The feeling from boot to ski was not lacking, at first, at all. After about every 10-15 days I had to re adjust the heels forward pressure do to the screw loosening up on me. I had some releases that I was really happy about. Never tore an ACL in the past but I have some other minor, compared to others, knee problems and instabilities. With the advertising videos they post those I had a fall or two similar to them. Whether I would be injured without those bindings I couldn't tell you, I am certainly not a medical professional. 

 

I do like the technology it provides, I do like the performance, and I do like the thought of the engineering. They use a 2 screw solid toe mount and excuse me for ignorance on nomenclature, a spool type rivet that the binding floats on so that when the ski flexes you don't get a pre release. But that "rivet" is where it went south, for me at least. Having the soft ski and being a guy who probably should cut down on beer I ended up ripping the toe piece solid state screws out of the ski. I feel that it is because there is only two instead of the traditional 3 solid state mounting points. With my mechanical thought process this would allow at any point, because of the floating rivet, just one of those screw mounts to take a full sheer load. That IMO is a lot of force on one mounting screw, screw hole, and point of ski where the ski is mounted to.  

 

I tried to helicoil them but to my avail the wood in the ski was a little too beat up to get a good enough bite for me. Now there are a number of factors here that could have caused the failure, my skiing, my weight, the flex of my skis, possible core stress fractures in the ski itself, my thoughts of how the force (it surrounds you) can be shifted on the mounting points, or the occasional lemon of issues that could have happened.

 

I want to hear others takes based off personal experiences or insightful thought on the circumstances of if they think my issue was a fluke or if it has to do with the binding itself.

 

Purl  

post #49 of 79
Prior ACL reconstruction in 1984 (basketball), am now 53, 235 lbs., have some arthritis in both knees, I still wear my ACL brace while skiing for peace of mind, and with my former Tyrolia and now Marker Griffon bindings, I have never once not released when I should have and have 100% confidence in my modern heal toe bindings. I set my bindings according to DIN, and if anything I have occasionally popped out when I wished I hadn't (going down a steep on one ski and knowing I'll have to climb back up or hope a friendly is above me). I also fall down once or twice a day: old school--if I'm not ever falling, then I'm not pushing myself enough. I have strained my knee while continuing down the fall line with no skis remaining on my boots, but that's a matter of velocity and going faster than a 52 year old really ought to be going.

My personal opinion is that the vast majority of knee injuries occur because bindings aren't set properly, or the skier has never learned how to fall properly. Not trashing knee bindings, just saying that the modern heal toe binding systems are very, very trustworthy (IMO). If you're concerned about knees, don't deviate from DIN. What does an occasional early release really hurt other than pride? (I fully acknowledge there are extreme and expert skiers who that theory does not apply to).

I'll post my recent discovery of the greatest product ever made for aging knees on another thread, because it really is that good.
post #50 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by RecontraBacan View Post

 
My personal opinion is that the vast majority of knee injuries occur because bindings aren't set properly, or the skier has never learned how to fall properly. Not trashing knee bindings, just saying that the modern heal toe binding systems are very, very trustworthy (IMO). If you're concerned about knees, don't deviate from DIN. What does an occasional early release really hurt other than pride? (I fully acknowledge there are extreme and expert skiers who that theory does not apply to).
 

As far as most knee injuries being due to bindings not being set properly, I don't think there's any evidence to support that; my opinion is that in most cases the bindings are set properly. As far as falling properly, whenever I've fallen I'm on the snow before I knew what's happened. The only way to learn to fall properly is to practice because it happens too fast to think about, and I suspect that more people would be injured practicing falling than would be saved from injury by having practiced. Knee injuries occur because it takes less force to injure a knee than to keep a boot in a binding during normal skiing.  The idea behind the knee binding makes sense to me; whether the idea actually works I have no idea, and I've never skied with knee bindings.

post #51 of 79
Hmmm. Shouldn't post. Shouldn't post. Oh hell.
Recontra, I'm lot older than you and routinely hit speeds higher than I ought to in the gates. (Run Look bindings.) All depends on the skier, his/her body, chance. One time, in my 30's tried to keep up with Stein Erickson in his 60's as he flew down a bumpfield while talking to his friends. And singing. I couldn't. Keep up, let alone sing. Rest my case.

Ghost, after all these years didn't realize your full set of letters. Tip of the helmet to ya. But yeah as much as said designer is irritating, quasi paranoid and oblique, I do pay attention when he's concerned about his own product.,Whatever decade this concern is made fully public will be interested in details.

Finally, to all testimonials: Will you guys please understand that negative evidence, e.g., the absence of an event like blowing out your knee, is not proof of a alternative conclusion, that a binding prevented it. Not A, therefore B is a logical fallacy. Period. At best, we would need truly massive numbers of events, for various skiers, locations, conditions, and gear (not just bindings) to even show statistically significant differences cell to cell. And that's not causality.

This new prospective study by the U of Denver, although not without several apparent flaws, at least has the idea right. Let's see.
post #52 of 79
The kind of injury KB is supposed to prevent results from a phantom foot fall. Standard bindings won't release in a phantom foot event.
post #53 of 79
Not sure you're addressing my comment, but my point was not an engineering one - what a binding can or cannnot do - rather a logical and epidemiological one. The relevant question is not about traditional bindings and Phantom Knee injury. It's whether the Knee Binding can in fact do what it's designers claim. Negative evidence doesn't bear on this question, nor do engineering parameters of either non-Knee or Knee bindings.

Footnote: Also unclear, at least as far as my orthopedic surgeon knows - and he covers a number of college teams in a number of sports, including skiing - precisely how Phantom Knee occurs. Again, engineering models using cadaveral tissue are not equivalent to on-slope events. They necessarily rest on simplified assumptions that do not cover all forces.

All good; to be fair, bridges and cars and pencils are made using simplified assumptions from a reduced set of forces.

That means that Knee Bindings should be considered successful in their own claims if they significantly reduce the frequency of the most common kind of ACL trauma. I look forward to scientific studies that test that. But they won't prevent all ACL trauma, and may have no impact on risk of some types, let alone MCL etc.
post #54 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Not sure you're addressing my comment, but my point was not an engineering one - what a binding can or cannnot do - rather a logical and epidemiological one. The relevant question is not about traditional bindings and Phantom Knee injury. It's whether the Knee Binding can in fact do what it's designers claim. Negative evidence doesn't bear on this question, nor do engineering parameters of either non-Knee or Knee bindings.

Footnote: Also unclear, at least as far as my orthopedic surgeon knows - and he covers a number of college teams in a number of sports, including skiing - precisely how Phantom Knee occurs. Again, engineering models using cadaveral tissue are not equivalent to on-slope events. They necessarily rest on simplified assumptions that do not cover all forces.

All good; to be fair, bridges and cars and pencils are made using simplified assumptions from a reduced set of forces.

That means that Knee Bindings should be considered successful in their own claims if they significantly reduce the frequency of the most common kind of ACL trauma. I look forward to scientific studies that test that. But they won't prevent all ACL trauma, and may have no impact on risk of some types, let alone MCL etc.


Totally. People have reported (anecdotally) appropriate releases, but there's been at least one report (here) of an ACL tear on KB caused by a non-phantom foot fall, which Howell (the design engineer) said specifically that the binding wouldn't prevent. According to KB, 70% of ACL injuries are phantom foot events.

 

The question is how do to determine DIN for a ligament? That's the issue. What's TUV going to do with that? (If they get a chance.)

post #55 of 79

epidemiological:

 

"relating to the branch of medicine which deals with the incidence, distribution, and control of diseases."

 

Perhaps it could be stretched to include injury,  but I am not so open ...

post #56 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Hmmm. Shouldn't post. Shouldn't post. Oh hell.
 
But yeah as much as said designer is irritating, quasi paranoid and oblique, I do pay attention when he's concerned about his own product.,Whatever decade this concern is made fully public will be interested in details.
 

Your first instinct was correct. The second highlight gets trotted out ALL. THE. TIME. it is bullshit. Yes, he did claim the (original, 1st generation/ 1st season) Kneebindings, if not recalled, would KILL!!! someone... that sounds like a claim that should be referenced by an educated science enthusiast 8 years later. Totally reasonable. Death by Kneebinding.

 

Gosh, I remember the winter of '08, all those poor souls lost to Kneebinding. The Lawyer/ Dentist/ Mid-level Exec professions lost some promising people that season on the blue groomers... It was horrible! (I should start a GoFundMe to 'help the families left behind' probably pay for that trip to Hokkaido I can't afford)

post #57 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by RecontraBacan View Post

Prior ACL reconstruction in 1984 (basketball), am now 53, 235 lbs., have some arthritis in both knees, I still wear my ACL brace while skiing for peace of mind, and with my former Tyrolia and now Marker Griffon bindings, I have never once not released when I should have and have 100% confidence in my modern heal toe bindings. I set my bindings according to DIN, and if anything I have occasionally popped out when I wished I hadn't (going down a steep on one ski and knowing I'll have to climb back up or hope a friendly is above me). I also fall down once or twice a day: old school--if I'm not ever falling, then I'm not pushing myself enough. I have strained my knee while continuing down the fall line with no skis remaining on my boots, but that's a matter of velocity and going faster than a 52 year old really ought to be going.

My personal opinion is that the vast majority of knee injuries occur because bindings aren't set properly, or the skier has never learned how to fall properly. Not trashing knee bindings, just saying that the modern heal toe binding systems are very, very trustworthy (IMO). If you're concerned about knees, don't deviate from DIN. What does an occasional early release really hurt other than pride? (I fully acknowledge there are extreme and expert skiers who that theory does not apply to).

I'll post my recent discovery of the greatest product ever made for aging knees on another thread, because it really is that good.
bindings are designed to prevent breaking your bones, they do nothing to save ligaments or cartilage, unless you set the din at 1 or lower.
post #58 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RecontraBacan View Post

Prior ACL reconstruction in 1984 (basketball), am now 53, 235 lbs., have some arthritis in both knees, I still wear my ACL brace while skiing for peace of mind, and with my former Tyrolia and now Marker Griffon bindings, I have never once not released when I should have and have 100% confidence in my modern heal toe bindings. I set my bindings according to DIN, and if anything I have occasionally popped out when I wished I hadn't (going down a steep on one ski and knowing I'll have to climb back up or hope a friendly is above me). I also fall down once or twice a day: old school--if I'm not ever falling, then I'm not pushing myself enough. I have strained my knee while continuing down the fall line with no skis remaining on my boots, but that's a matter of velocity and going faster than a 52 year old really ought to be going.

My personal opinion is that the vast majority of knee injuries occur because bindings aren't set properly, or the skier has never learned how to fall properly. Not trashing knee bindings, just saying that the modern heal toe binding systems are very, very trustworthy (IMO). If you're concerned about knees, don't deviate from DIN. What does an occasional early release really hurt other than pride? (I fully acknowledge there are extreme and expert skiers who that theory does not apply to).

I'll post my recent discovery of the greatest product ever made for aging knees on another thread, because it really is that good.
bindings are designed to prevent breaking your bones, they do nothing to save ligaments or cartilage, unless you set the din at 1 or lower.

I believe the point is to design a binding that DOES save ligaments and cartilage. A worthy enterprise. Whether the KB is it remains to be seen. 

post #59 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

bindings are designed to prevent breaking your bones, they do nothing to save ligaments or cartilage, unless you set the din at 1 or lower.

 

Bindings in general, of course, won't. KB is a different animal, designed specifically to prevent ACL tears caused by the most common injury mechanism. There's a web site.

post #60 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

 I do pay attention when he's concerned about his own product.

 

It's hard to know what that was all about — or any of it was about. He made those comments after being forced out. No way of knowing what motivated them.

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