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NNN BC Bindings

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Just getting started with XC skiing. Found some good/cheap skis with NNN BC bindings, and they're working well for me so far. Mostly doing flats at this point, but starting to nibble on rolling terrain and some small hills. And mostly staying vertical, but occasionally take a tumble. Getting back up can be, er, interesting.  ;-)

 

Anyway, since the stuff I'm doing is flat and slow not that concerned about damaging myself, but I do wonder when things go in different directions how well those bindings will hold up? Seems like they could get torqued by a fall and perhaps rendered inoperable?

 

These are the type bindings I have...

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

Seem reasonably substantial, but ... any hard-earned wisdom to share?

post #2 of 18
That's a durable binding. The BC stands for backcountry. The standard touring Nordic binding is similar, but less beefy. Enjoy these. They are good bindings and will give you extra control on downhills over the non-BC NNN binding. Not sure if you're worried about damaging the binding or yourself. You're not likely to damage the binding, but like all XC bindings, they do not release, so your foot stays connected during a fall. Not much you can do about that, but I think it's safe to say you'll fall less on BC skis and bindings than on narrower touring skis. Consider yourself lucky you were able to find a cheap pair of BC skis.
post #3 of 18

Seconding ADKS' commentary.  Those are solid bindings.

 

I like my NNN BC setup so much, I just gave my old touring skis to a friend.  I only bought the BC skis last year- I should have made the switch long ago.

 

I think one of the things I really like about the BC stuff is the beefier boots.  I'm playing around in the local woods, not doing endless tours so I will gladly take the extra bit of weight that comes with a more supportive boot.

 

Enjoy!
 

post #4 of 18

Those bindings are called the Magnum. They are actually the beefiest of the major two models available for NNN BC. I have the automatic version of what you have above, slightly narrower, but the bar is still NNN BC length. 

In total, there are 3 bar sizes that I know of:

Skating

NNN

NNN BC

 

Most free heel bindings are not designed to be released at all. The same is true for telemark skiing. I have taken major falls at even high speed... the beauty behind telemark / cross country is that it's pretty hard to twist a knee. You can face plant, etc... and I am sure you could totally damage your knees if you tried hard enough, but seriously doubtful. 


When things get sketchy, bend your knees (okay, bend them even more). Most falls will take place on your butt, so go ahead: lean forward a bit more. 

 

Enjoy these bindings for a lifetime... just place some grease into the mechanism at the end of each season. 

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludovic View Post

In total, there are 3 bar sizes that I know of:

Skating

NNN

NNN BC

 

Are the bars different in length only or in diameter also? Just being curious whether you can use a BC boot (longer bar) in the regular or skate bindings which are narrower...

post #6 of 18

The bar is a bigger diameter as well. The difference is pretty substantial when you look at them side by side. edit: the spacing and size of the ridges that run the length of the binding are different, too. There's no way you could use a bc boot in a track/touring binding.

 

 

To the OP:

 

I've been nordic backcountry skiing on nnnbc and bc magnum bindings for almost a year now. I'm still pretty nervous on downhills, but have gotten a lot better. I fall several times almost every time I go skiing. Knees and bindings are all still in tact. The magnums, like you showed above, give a small, but noticeable amount of extra control when putting the skis on edge. If you want to work on going downhill and turning, find a mellow sledding hill and use it when there's noone else there. I did that earlier this winter and it made a ton of difference. I went from barely being able to step turn without falling to making somewhat passable stem christies after a few sessions. 

post #7 of 18

Great binding.

 

The bars on the boots are different in both length and diameter.  You cannot use an NNN BC boot with a non-BC NNN binding.

 

-Zohan
 

post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks all for the feedback/advice!   icon14.gif

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

Are the bars different in length only or in diameter also? Just being curious whether you can use a BC boot (longer bar) in the regular or skate bindings which are narrower...

no.

 

Both the bars /and/ the sole pattern are differently dimensioned.   A NNN-BC boot won't fit in a touring binding even if you grind the bar down and put washers on the ends.

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

Couple of good overview pages...

 

  http://www.nordicskisource.com/Ski-Bindings-Explained-s/264354.htm

 

  http://skinnyskis.com/bootsandbindings

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anrothar View Post

 

I've been nordic backcountry skiing on nnnbc and bc magnum bindings for almost a year now. I'm still pretty nervous on downhills, but have gotten a lot better. I fall several times almost every time I go skiing. Knees and bindings are all still in tact. The magnums, like you showed above, give a small, but noticeable amount of extra control when putting the skis on edge. If you want to work on going downhill and turning, find a mellow sledding hill and use it when there's noone else there. I did that earlier this winter and it made a ton of difference. I went from barely being able to step turn without falling to making somewhat passable stem christies after a few sessions. 

 

Sound advice - I've been thinking along the same lines. I've done some skinning up at resorts after hours/close of season to get some experience on an AT setup in a benign environment. Have been eyeballing the beginner ski/snowboard area at local resort for XC learning purposes. Now that the days are getting longer figure I might hit that for some laps going up and down the gentle incline. Find the balance and explore how to navigate the downhill - right now when out I just traverse and cut the angle to the point where I'm not picking up a lot of speed.

 

Will enjoy learning to turn on XC gear, but am having a great time just being out in the woods gliding along. Good stuff!  ;-)

post #11 of 18

Plenty strong enough.

 

In a cartwheel crash my son trashed a pair of my skis with NNN-BC bindings.  Broke a ski and pulled the binding screws out!

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

OK, I guess them bindings gonna hold up, even if the body parts might not!  ;-)

 

Don't plan on rag-dollin' while XC skiing anytime soon, but I may still throw some duct tape and baling wire in my pack for those times when I'm gonna be more than a 1/2 mile away from terra firma. Hopefully could put/keep things together enough to slide out in a worse-case scenario, and not have to post-hole home.

 

Cheers.

post #13 of 18

When they get 10+ years old, keep an eye on the housing plastic.    Also, some of the older  2-piece ones (heel plate separate from toe section) that aren't mounted too terribly well (as in: heelplate screw pullout and core rot).     Your boots are more likely to delaminate before that tho.

post #14 of 18

So how much snow is needed to use a bc ski setup?  i bought everything 2 years ago and it hasn't snowed here since.  Rumor has it ther is snow coming to NJ.  Might try to go up and down the block.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post

So how much snow is needed to use a bc ski setup?  i bought everything 2 years ago and it hasn't snowed here since.  Rumor has it ther is snow coming to NJ.  Might try to go up and down the block.

 

1.5 inch, maybe less if the pavement is cold before the snow starts.    2 inches is the threshold around here for warmish paved paths and golf course-short meadows.

 

BUT, if you want some real fun, find a snow emergency route that has an uphill section on it and ski the snowplow slough.     

 

That can be awsum fun, but you have to grab it fresh before it lump-crusts over.

post #16 of 18
Go to Highpoint XC center in NJ or, even better, Mohonk Mountain house or Minnewaska State Park near New Paltz, NY. There should be plenty of snow, according to the latest forecasts. I will be at Belleayre all weekend.
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADKS View Post

Go to Highpoint XC center in NJ or, even better, Mohonk Mountain house or Minnewaska State Park near New Paltz, NY. There should be plenty of snow, according to the latest forecasts. I will be at Belleayre all weekend.

Not driving to use these skis. These were purchased for when the MTB trails have too much snow to ride on. If I drive that far, there better be a chair lift.

post #18 of 18

Possibilities are Endless...

Here in Canaan Valley (WV), locals can be found using all sorts of gear to enjoy the outdoors / the snow. 

At the top of the list, I believe everyone has at least one pair of xc skis. 2"+ inches of snow, and we are out playing. 

The same skis can be used to climb (steep mountains) and come down making turns (telemark turns). Of course, it will take you a while to get the hang of a telemark turn, especially on steep slopes, but we totally enjoy it. 

Next on the list, lift access resorts: Telemark specific gear. Think of it as a regular alpine skis but your heels are never attached. You go up with a chair lift or skin up. The way down is almost strictly telemark stance. 

Alpine Gear is the norm, that's what most people would call "I am going skiing" and it's the most-often-used piece of gear here too. Toes and heels are "locked" in the binding. 

Snowboarding can and is also used on the chairlift, but I know many people who climb with snowshoes and ride down. 

 

Back to the NNN BC bindings, or xc setup... there are several of us who climb plenty here, but once in a while, we'll play on the groomed surface as well. Chairlift up, ski down. For the most part, our xc setup don't even have metal edges. 

 

Here's a quick video - jump to 2:07 and you for the XC setup going downhill

(that's a Black Diamond trail that's starting to be bumped up). 

 

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