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Newbie needs help on finding the right gears

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I am beginner in Ski and want to buy full gears for myself as I already fell in love with this sport. 

 

I was surfing the internet and found the following item which was selling at a deep discount, so I pulled my trigger:

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/blizzard-the-origin-alpine-skis-twin-tip~p~3509h/

 

Below is the description on the skis for those who can open the URL:

Lightweight and snappy, The Origin skis from Blizzard feature solid sandwich wood core and twin tip design for amazing performance in the park or pipe.

  • Ideal for park and pipe or freestyle
  • Designed for the intermediate-to-expert level skier
  • Fiberglass top sheet and sandwich wood core construction
  • Twin tip and equipped with a Metal Tail Protector
  • Sidecut dimensions: 116/80/107mm
  • Turn radius: 16.5m
  • Weight: 6 lb. 12 oz. (based on 171)
  • Core: Wood
  • Edge: Steel

 

However, after taking a closer look at the item I found that this twin tip skis are designed for advanced skier. My question is 1)should I keep this skis or I should just return it? 2)will the risks of getting injury become a lot bigger if I use this skis (again, I am a beginner) 3) If I decided to keep the skis, should I purchase a binding that is designed for beginner or one that is for advance skier since the skis are for advance skier? Any recommendation for ski binding.

 

Sorry for asking a lot of dumb questions. I really know nothing about ski and your suggestions are highly appreciated. 

 

Thanks,

Song

post #2 of 9

Welcome to Epic,

 

Starting and learning on beginner equipment is best.

 

The many function is that it easy to initiate the the skills required in skiing and that the equipment is forgiving when mistakes are made (as you will make them as you start out).  This helps you develop the skills need to improve by allowing you to make errors and not be punished by them.

 

As you move up the level , the equipment becomes more responsive and less forgiving.

 

Even higher up the equipment becomes responsive to the point of twitchyness (as it has little or no forgiveness on errors made).  A good example of this is full blown race skis (tuned to the max), fast and precise as can be, but you so much lose concentration they will bite you (HARD).  Trying to learn on this just doesn't work as you can't initiate the skill set without being punished for it as a beginner as the skill set has to be perfect (remember slightest mistake, extremely hard and immediate punishment)

 

The other issue purpose, beginner skis are designed to be all around carving skis for the most part.  You want to get good basic skills first.  Park skis, twin tips, powder skis etc are designed for more specific applications and in some cases can greatly limit your ability to learn proper technique.

 

So, consider the following:

 

1. Good fitting boots (you don't have to break the bank, but don't buy something at this point to far beyond your ability).

2. Bindings (anything where you fall within the DIN range (very important) to prevent injury.

3. Skis honestly consider something in the beginner/intermediate range and no more at this point.  (used in some cases can be OK, depending you how fast you are looking to progress).   Also get the skis more towards a general application to start, specialize on the next set maybe.

 

Something that might be better could be something like this (again without knowing your age, ht, wt and sex, yes women's skis can be different) I'm only giving an example:

 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/skis/k2-amp-force.aspx#image=43276.Size.LengthCM_153_Image.jpg

 

for about the same as what you paid for the other ones (and bindings are included).  Local shops can on occasion have similar deals and at that point support them.  Don't forget they are looking to get your repeat business and they will provide your technical support.

 

Boots, get fitted at a good shop, the few extra dollars are worth the investment (not that I'm against buying on line, but you really have know what you are doing here, and even the most experienced have problems on line as it is about fit and product knowledge),  If you are comfortable you will want to ski more and improve faster.

 

The advantage of having your own equipment is that is the same and well maintained which again makes it easier for you.

 

I hope that some of the Supporters and very experience people in this site chime in and give you some more specific advise and product knowledge.

 

Also read through some of the other posts on this topic, you'll be surprised how many others are asking similar questions.

 

Good luck.

post #3 of 9

I think those skis may work for you. Most park skis are fairly soft & relatively forgiving.

What is your height & weight? How long are the skis?

oldschoolskier offers some good advise - your boots are the single most important piece of ski gear you own. Get to a decent ski shop & ask their advice based on you size, foot shape and skiing style. Once you get a pair of boots that work for you, you can give those new skis a try. If you don't have s hop close by, you may have to wait until you visit a resort to buy a pair of boots. Again...a firm, comfortable FIT IS CRITICAL, so don't settle for a boot that either hurts or allows your foot to slop around.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thank you and Oldschoolskier for giving me the advice. 

 

I am 5'9, 170lbs male. The skis are 171cm long. Do you still think the skis I purchased would work for me? If so, will this binding a good fit to the ski? 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/alpine-ski-bindings/marker-the-squire-110mm-brakes-2011.aspx#image=35212.Color.Hardgoods_WhiteBlack_Image.jpg

 

Thanks for helping me on this, much appreciated! 

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice, Oldschoolskier. 

 

I actually looked at the ski package your suggested before, they are good value but 153cm seems too short for my height. I am a male, 5'9 weighted 170lbs, and Evo is recommending 165-170cm skis. 

 

Again, thanks for your suggestion!

post #6 of 9

153cm is not too short for a beginner.  If you were an intermediate or better, the Evo recommendation would be correct.  You'll find the 153cm skis much easier to turn and that makes a huge difference when you're first learning.

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Got it! Thanks

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by songtan View Post

Thanks for the advice, Oldschoolskier. 

 

I actually looked at the ski package your suggested before, they are good value but 153cm seems too short for my height. I am a male, 5'9 weighted 170lbs, and Evo is recommending 165-170cm skis. 

 

Again, thanks for your suggestion!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

153cm is not too short for a beginner.  If you were an intermediate or better, the Evo recommendation would be correct.  You'll find the 153cm skis much easier to turn and that makes a huge difference when you're first learning. icon14.gif icon14.gif

What he said  ^^^^^,  Thanks mtcyclist.

 

As to the length my shortest is a 165 in a slalom ski and I'm 6' 170lbs, I even considered a 155 because of what the intended application was for, it just so happened that the 165 came up first for the right price.  My 14yr old son is 5'8" 165lbs and on 160 Beginner/Intermediate skis (hand me downs several times over) and progressing nicely.  I suspect next season I get him something in the low advanced range because he will be ready for it.

 

I think the park skis (while ski-able because they are softer skis) at this point might not be the best for development.  See the comment about learning to carve first, after that choose your poison as they say. 

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by songtan View Post

Thank you and Oldschoolskier for giving me the advice. 

 

I am 5'9, 170lbs male. The skis are 171cm long. Do you still think the skis I purchased would work for me? If so, will this binding a good fit to the ski? 

http://www.evo.com/outlet/alpine-ski-bindings/marker-the-squire-110mm-brakes-2011.aspx#image=35212.Color.Hardgoods_WhiteBlack_Image.jpg

 

Thanks for helping me on this, much appreciated! 

Haven't used the binding and at this point don't have a need for it so I know very little about it. For bindings,  I'm a little more of a get the screw gun out and screw the the skis to the boot kinda guy.  Don't want any pre-release or binding failure (and yes I know the risks) wink.gif

 

What I have and use or am interested in I learn in detail (to the extent of matching the elite), the rest I'll leave to the experts.  My brain might explode if I knew everything eek.gif (blue screen of death kinda thing).

 

Go out, ski and have fun.  You'll be at this point soon.

 

G

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