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How to have fun skiing in dense fog - Page 3

post #61 of 62
How to have "fun"? Redefine it!

Jump in with both feet and savor the uniqueness of the experience. Sure, you can change your goggle lens, find some trees, and apply some of the other suggestions above to try to add some visibility. But you can also shift your paradigm a bit and experience something truly different. Perhaps you cannot buy a great turn in a true whiteout--but there are plenty of other things for sale! You cannot see, there is very little to hear, if it's powdery there isn't much to feel either. Sensory deprivation is weird, frightening, and confusing, and it's easy (and normal) to tense up, hold back, even panic a little. You can't tell up from down, can't tell how fast or slowly you're going--or even sometimes if you've come to a stop. It's wild! You can wish it was different and curse your misfortune. Or you can seize the opportunity to experience the oddness of it, to tune into the kinesthetic subtleties, and to let the weirdness captivate you.

You wouldn't want to do it all the time, I'm sure. And if you are in unfamiliar terrain, especially if it may include cliffs or other truly dangerous "features," you can really get in trouble. But if you know that you are in essentially safe terrain, then tighten up your "core" a bit, drag your poles like whiskers, take a deep breath, and indulge yourself in an exotic, strange, intense adventure. The very freakiness of the experience--and how we react to it--can be fascinating, if we let it.

And remember--if there's something you need to see, don't worry--you'll feel it!

cool.gif

Best regards,
Bob
post #62 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

How to have "fun"? Redefine it!

Jump in with both feet and savor the uniqueness of the experience. Sure, you can change your goggle lens, find some trees, and apply some of the other suggestions above to try to add some visibility. But you can also shift your paradigm a bit and experience something truly different. Perhaps you cannot buy a great turn in a true whiteout--but there are plenty of other things for sale! You cannot see, there is very little to hear, if it's powdery there isn't much to feel either. Sensory deprivation is weird, frightening, and confusing, and it's easy (and normal) to tense up, hold back, even panic a little. You can't tell up from down, can't tell how fast or slowly you're going--or even sometimes if you've come to a stop. It's wild! You can wish it was different and curse your misfortune. Or you can seize the opportunity to experience the oddness of it, to tune into the kinesthetic subtleties, and to let the weirdness captivate you.

You wouldn't want to do it all the time, I'm sure. And if you are in unfamiliar terrain, especially if it may include cliffs or other truly dangerous "features," you can really get in trouble. But if you know that you are in essentially safe terrain, then tighten up your "core" a bit, drag your poles like whiskers, take a deep breath, and indulge yourself in an exotic, strange, intense adventure. The very freakiness of the experience--and how we react to it--can be fascinating, if we let it.

And remember--if there's something you need to see, don't worry--you'll feel it!

cool.gif

Best regards,Bob

Thanks Bob for the additional information. I believe you don't need to see to ski...ski post #6

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