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Another noob buyer lookin for advice!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hey all Ive recently been re-bitten by the ski bug and have decided its time to buy a set of my own rather then rent.  Basically lookin to get into a good all mountain ski that will work good on groomers but has the ability to move into bumps at some point.  I ski'd a fair amount about 10 years ago and was comfortable on blue/black slopes, hadnt got ballsy enough to try blacks yet.  Im sure ive lost some of that but I dont think itll take much to get back there.  I live in the midwest but take vacations to ski in colorado. 

 

I just demo'd a couple different skis this weekend on the little IN hills.  I tried the Elan amphibio waveflex 12's and a pair of Salomon bbr 7.9's, both in the 170ish length.  I liked both for different reasons, I liked how crisp the Elans were and they were fast.  The Salomons were super smooth and easy to ride.  I wanted to try some Head x-shape mtx or stx's but they didnt have any available.   Im 6ft, 200 lbs, intermediate/advanced skier, speed doesnt scare me but I dont blast down every slope either.  I was comfortable on both of the sets I tried and just wondering what suggestions were out there for something a little more friendly to the pocket book.    

 

 

Any input is greatly appreciated!  Skis, boots, bindings, you name it   All I know is what Ive read on the internet lol. 

post #2 of 15
welcome.
My first piece of advice would be to visit a good shop with a good boot fitter and get your boots sorted.Nobody can reccomend a specific boot on a forum and they are a crucial bit of kit.

Second piece of advice would be to just get out there and ski, renting/demoiing for now. Make a note of which skis you liked and look for end of season deals. After you have demoed a ski, do a search here for reviews/opinions. This forum provides a wealth of information and it is my go to ski forum for ridiculously overanalysed ski advice. However, specific ski advice can't really be given unless you provide more info eg. What have you tried and what did you like/dislike etc.

170 is too short for you for an all mountain ski.
Most of my mates are your size or bigger. If they needed to borrow a pair of skis, I would probably dust off my Head Monster 77's (177cm) for them.

IMO, you should be looking for something in the 80to 90mm max. waist width, at least 175cm in length but probably not much longer than 180 at this stage.

Lessons are invaluable, particularly if you are still tentative on black runs.

Hope this gives you something to think about.
Cheers
post #3 of 15

Welcome!

As craigr said, get your boots dialed in before you get serious about skis, then do more demoing.  

There are some good options in the category that you're looking at, including the Elan Amphibio that you mention.  I'm a little surprised that you liked the BBR at your size but then .......I'm not hard to surprise. 

 

Another ski you may add to your demo list since we know they have Salomon, is the Enduro.  

 

.....I'm sure I'll think of a few more.

post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input! Boots are definatly on the top of the list, when I demod last weekend I tried a performance boot and liked how stiff it was. Felt like the skis were easier to communicate with. It was kinda hard on me but it was a rental so no suprise there.

I'd love to provide any info I can, I largely don't know what to add. I also unfortunately don't have the opportunity to demo much. Living in the Midwest limits my skiing, I'm a half days drive to the closest hill.

Couple questions, one what will stretching the ski length do in an all mountain ski? I've read up on it but its been a little hard to decipher what a longer skis benefit vs draw back is lol.

Also just out of curiousity on the bbr, am I to big or small for that ski? I'm pretty athletic and adapt to different things fairly quick. I just don't know a lot on how to pick a "good" ski for me. I know whats recommended for length, the difference between rocker and camber, and some of the other basics I can learn by Internet reading but that's about it.

How different are the two skis I tried? I know the elan felt happier at speed, crisper and more responsive. The bbr was smoother and easier to ski I guess is the best I can describe it. Another drawback to my location is its always icy unless I take a trip to the mountains. Man made snow just isn't the same!
post #5 of 15

There are literally tons of options for all mountain skis, probably too many to cover in one thread. 

 

A longer ski is a more stable ski at speed, you have more material under you and also more edge. At your height and weight I think you would be find on anything under 180cm, but I would not go below 170cm.

 

Alittle more info on what conditions you ski would be helpful since there are skis at opposite ends of the spectrum in that 80-90mm range. If it's mostly ice you may want to skew towards more of a carver ski that can still handle alittle of everything else, rather than a true all mountain ski that won't quite have as much ice performance.

post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowtie View Post

Thanks for the input! Boots are definatly on the top of the list, when I demod last weekend I tried a performance boot and liked how stiff it was. Felt like the skis were easier to communicate with. It was kinda hard on me but it was a rental so no suprise there.

I'd love to provide any info I can, I largely don't know what to add. I also unfortunately don't have the opportunity to demo much. Living in the Midwest limits my skiing, I'm a half days drive to the closest hill.

1- Couple questions, one what will stretching the ski length do in an all mountain ski? I've read up on it but its been a little hard to decipher what a longer skis benefit vs draw back is lol.

2. Also just out of curiousity on the bbr, am I to big or small for that ski? I'm pretty athletic and adapt to different things fairly quick. I just don't know a lot on how to pick a "good" ski for me. I know whats recommended for length, the difference between rocker and camber, and some of the other basics I can learn by Internet reading but that's about it.

3.How different are the two skis I tried? I know the elan felt happier at speed, crisper and more responsive. The bbr was smoother and easier to ski I guess is the best I can describe it. Another drawback to my location is its always icy unless I take a trip to the mountains. Man made snow just isn't the same!
  1. Stretching the ski length will give you more stability at speed but while you're learning a shorter ski will be more manageable and easy to turn. 
  2. The BBR can be a soft-ish ski and the length you tested seems short for your size.   It may be good for you while you're learning but I doubt that you'll like it in the long run.  But I could be wrong.....I sometimes am
  3. The two skis you skied are really different.  The Amphibio is an interesting concept with the rocker tip and tail on the outside edges and full camber on the inside, making it super easy to turn, and has a strong groomer bias and.   The BBR is an all mountain ski that is designed do a lot of things pretty well and does all of them, ok.  Its target group is someone who wants a ski that will do everything for their 6-10 days of skiing per year. 
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
I definatly fall into the category of 10 days a year. Most of the days will primarily be in a week long ski trip to the Rockies with a couple short day trips to local man made hills. It's fairly unlikely ill ever get into any serious powder skiing, outside of some fresh snowfall on groomed slopes. With as little time as I get per year to do it ill spend my time on the groomers. With that said should I even be looking at all mountain skis?

I also dont guess im really looking for a "here's the perfect ski" kind of answer. Rather what direction or characteristics should I be looking into. Are there brands that clearly stand above the others. I don't want a junk ski as I will likely use them for years before replacing them. I relatively confident I could ski on a large number of different models and makes. Just trying to narrow my focus, there are so many options its overwhelming lol! And my availability to demo a lot is limited. So when I do go demo I'd like to have a good idea of skis to try.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbowtie View Post

I definatly fall into the category of 10 days a year. Most of the days will primarily be in a week long ski trip to the Rockies with a couple short day trips to local man made hills. It's fairly unlikely ill ever get into any serious powder skiing, outside of some fresh snowfall on groomed slopes. With as little time as I get per year to do it ill spend my time on the groomers. With that said should I even be looking at all mountain skis?

I also dont guess im really looking for a "here's the perfect ski" kind of answer. Rather what direction or characteristics should I be looking into. Are there brands that clearly stand above the others. I don't want a junk ski as I will likely use them for years before replacing them. I relatively confident I could ski on a large number of different models and makes. Just trying to narrow my focus, there are so many options its overwhelming lol! And my availability to demo a lot is limited. So when I do go demo I'd like to have a good idea of skis to try.

I'd say if you want to improve your skills and have a ton of fun, you should most definitely get your own boots and skis.  

 

If I were you, (and I used to be in your demographic) I'd get a good all mountain ski that will help you improve your skills and get you set up for your trips to the Rockies.  If you need something more powder specific, you can rent/demo powder skis when you're there.  In the mean time, a good consistent gear set up should help you and you'll save some $$ in the long run. 

 

Consider something like the Nordica Firearrow 80, Blizzard Magnum 8.0, Rossignol Experience 78.......

post #9 of 15

On behalf of the entire ski industry welcome back!!!!  

 

Most of the reply are good because they direct you toward building your experience from the foot on down.  Find a reputable ski store and start asking questions.  Have the salesman get some boots for you and start trying on!!!  It's that easy. Forget brand names and models.  Just find a boot that is comfortable and compliments your skiing style. The rest is gravy.  You can always move in and out of skis.  But boots are the single connection between you and the ski.  If your feet are uncomfortable then you will be uncomfortable.  And remember skiing is all about having fun.  That's why you decided to do it again!!!  

 

Some questions you should be thinking about or any good salesman should ask:

 

Where you do most of your skiing?  How many days?  You mention trips to CO, but how many days are really spent at your local hill?  

 

How do you like to ski: fast, medium, cautious?  How do you like to turn?  short, medium or long?  Do you jam in and out of the fall line or do you like to cruise?  Do you want to mix it up?  Do you want to ski in a laid back tempo and relax, or do you want to work while you ski?  

 

Who do you ski with?  kids, aggressive skiers, slow cruisers, beginners, older people?  

 

What are your goals for skiing? Ski faster, more technically proficient?  

 

You also mention skiing groomers.  Where do you ski on the groomers?  Center of the trail, or the edges?  

 

What is your budget?  This makes a difference.  Light on the pocketbook is different for everyone.   

 

 

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the recommendations trekchick! Ill look those up!

Ill try to answer your questions sorry if I miss some lol.
As for speed I'd say I fall into the medium range most of the time, I tend to like shorter turns, I tend to get in and out of the fall line, not crazy about just Layin back and cruisin. I feel like if I'm not pushing my boundaries atleast a little then I'm not havin enough fun lol

The people I ski with are comparable to my level, actually most of them are boarders rather then skiers. I personally would like to be more technically proficient and fluid. As for where I ski, a little all over the place. I tend to look for where the snow is the best. If its consistent ill stay towards the center
post #11 of 15

Mrbowtie, I've tagged some of the skis mentioned in the right column of the thread.  If you take a look there, you'll find most of the information you're looking for and some reviews by Bears. 

 

 

Tags

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Ohh. As for price. I'd like to be between 400-500 on the skis and bindings together. I'd like to leave room for good boots and a fitting.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Awesome. Thanks!!!
post #14 of 15

Have you checked the Gear Swap area here on EpicSki? 

 

This may be a good option for you. 

http://www.epicski.com/t/117298/fs-rossignol-strato-80ti-170cm-new-with-bindings

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
No I hadn't. But I'll be diggin around I'm there a lot now lol.
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