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Recommendations for first pair of skis

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hei Epicski!
 
I'm hoping to buy my very first pair of skis and I'm looking for some recommendations. Since I started skiing again, renting has become a problem for me due to the poor quality and long wait for weekend rental skis in Sweden. I'm an advanced/experienced skier, but by no definition of the word an expert, meaning I struggle on steep bumpy blacks, but still enjoy them. Last year was my first time skiing in 5 years, but I clocked a good 19 days learning to love the sport again.
 
 
Some ski relevant information about me:
Male
26 years old
177 cm (5.8 foot)
62 kg (136 lbs)
~14-15 weeks of experience
DIN setting 5 - 5.5
Located in north europe
 
 
Conditions and places: Because of where I'm located (Copenhagen, Denmark), I only have daytrip access to a minor, but expensive, hill in south Sweden, which means I do my main skiing spending a week or two in the alps each year. Since I therefore have no real local hills, conditions can be difficult to predict and/or buy skis for. For example, I am going somewhere familiar this year, where the groomers are almost always fluffy and dry, but spent last year in France with conditions being varied, but mostly icy crud. Meanwhile, my daytrips to Sweden so far have been either boilerplate hardpacked or slush-ice. 
 
Previous equipment experience: Last year, I skied two different rental skis back to back for a week each, but I didn't note down the name of either, except one was a fischer and the other a dynastar. The Dynastar was softer, which made it, or so it seems to me, a more forgiving and playful ski, but not nessesarily a better ski compared to the harder and faster Fischer. The two days I've been out this year, I've borrowed a pair of Atomic Performers Pro L (2010) from a friend. This was my first experience with a proper ski, i.e. a non-rental, and while I enjoyed them a lot, something about them seems a little off. It's a great ski with very good maneuverability, which I like in a ski, but it also seems sorta stifled, as if with all that racing fronside carver it lacks a little playfulness. Sorry about these terms, I'm not very used to the equipment lingo.
 
Terrain: I mainly ski groomers, but I have booked a sort of beginners guide to offpiste thing for a day this year, which while something I'm hoping to do more, should only be factored into any recommendation at most 10-20%. It's mostly groomers for me, though I love the feeling of the new snow on each side of the piste.
 
Someone on this forum, I think it might have been 'Dawg', said that each pair of skis has something to teach whoever is skiing them and as such, I'm looking for a fun ski to help me move from experienced towards expert. The skis on my radar right now are the blizzard bonafides (mainly because the reviews are off the charts) and the Dynastar Speed Course Ti (because I've been told it's a super fun ski, but still a superb carver). Please note, I'm not choosing between these two skis, so feel free to recommend any ski you'd think would be right for me. I wish I had the opportunity to demo a few, but living in a country without slopes makes that hard.
 
If I left out any information, let me know. It's been a joy reading this forum for the last few weeks.
 
ps. I enjoy speed :)
post #2 of 26
Thread Starter 

I can no longer edit my post, but needed to add: I have my own boots.

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Not to turn this thread into a personal blog, but I've started looking at other skis (wish the edit function didn't disappear). I've gone off the blizzard bonafides, it seems like a great ski, but it's unavailable both in the shops here and from the net, so there's no point debating it further.
 
The Dynastar Speed Course Ti still speaks to me as a great ski (plus, I've found them online for ~350 euros with bindings), but I worry about the skis being too groomer oriented for the above mentioned offpiste beginner tour AND whether or not these skis are simply too 'expert' for me to keep up. Also, are they 'too stiff' to ski the moguls? 
 
I'm also looking at the Dynstar Outland range, focusing on the Outland 80 XT and the Outland 80 Pro, trying to weigh the pros and cons on the added titanium on the Pros, but thinking the pro might satisfy my need for speed better. My only concern is that the descriptions of this range of skis never say playful, but rather 'stable' and 'cruising', which might make short-turns a laborious experience? If that's the case, then the momentum gained over frontside racer carving is lost when I hit those bombed-out-looking crud/icy/powder european blacks with pertruding rocks masquerading as moguls.
 
It's not that I'm exclusively looking and reading about dynastar skis, but it's just the two that stood out. Other than that, my local intersport shop has the Fischer Motive 80s (Maybe C-line, maybe not) from last year on offer, but I don't know much about them, except what I've gleaned from reviews here and on other sites. I've discovered the Fischer Rentals I tried for a week last year to be Fischer Cool Heat RX.

Edited by prinneh - 1/28/13 at 2:40pm
post #4 of 26

A Scandahoovian!

 

Just fyi, I work for a Danish company and had two colleagues out at Whistler 2 weekends ago. They approved of the beer, and the hill. Danes are great to work and play with - good group of people!

 

Oh, skis, well, I'm not a groomer guy, so can't help you there, but hope you get some feedback.

post #5 of 26

I'm currently in Italy doing freelance photography with a former Danski guide and friend of mine, from Oesterbro. We both ski groomers 90% of the time with some off the sides, and occasional fresh. She daily drives Dynastar Omeglass Speeds and I'm currently renting Kastle MX78s. Her mogul/bump/short turn ski is the Head Magnum. For mostly groomers at speed, the Dynastars are awesome, as are the Kastles.

 

I'm slightly taller than you and a fair bit heavier, but I'm currently looking for the same kind of ski and I also have 15 week's skiing. I haven't yet tried them, but the Experience 88 would be on my list to demo if you can find a pair. The Kastles are unlike anything else I've tried and I love them! You really need to demo as much as possible before you settle on a purchase. That would be my advice. And if you want to come to centre of the known universe for Danes in Italy, come down to Sestriere and say hi smile.gif

post #6 of 26

Welcome to EpicSki.  If you're looking for a playful ski, consider the Nordica Steadfast and Elan 888.  I ski the Steadfast and my son skis the Elans.  We both love our skis.  And there are quite a few people on here who like both.  And you would want about 170cm in either ski.

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by prinneh View Post

The skis on my radar right now are the blizzard bonafides (mainly because the reviews are off the charts) and the Dynastar Speed Course Ti (because I've been told it's a super fun ski, but still a superb carver). 

Neither of these are what I'd call a fun ski for on-piste. The Speed Course Ti is a serious club level race carver, and it expects some skill sets. It will not want to go off piste. The Bonafides are a great ski, prolly fun in soft snow, but not for what you say you want on frozen piste, or for your level. I like ^^^^ suggestions if you want to aim more than 50% off-piste, for mostly on-piste would suggest the Blizzard 8.0 Ti if you like a livelier feel, or the Outland 80 Pro for a damper one. 

post #8 of 26

You really need to provide more information to get an adequate recommendation.  I question the logic of some responses because they fail to address some of the most basic questions.  Honestly I'm not sure how anyone can make a worthy and serious recommendation without asking for more basic information.

 

For example, how do you like to ski: fast, medium, cautious?  How do you like to turn?  short, medium or long?  Do you jam in and out of the fall line or do you like to cruise?  Do you want to mix it up?  Do you want to ski in a laid back tempo and relax, or do you want to work while you ski?  

 

Who do you ski with?  

 

What are your goals for skiing? Ski faster, more technically proficient?  

 

You also mention skiing groomers.  Where do you ski on the groomers?  Center of the trail, or the edges?  

 

You talk about skiing boiler plate when your at home.   Is this the place where you do most of your skiing?  How many days do you really think you'll spend skiing in those ideal conditions vs the vacation trips? Are you confident on those conditions?

 

 What kind of boots do you own?  What is your budget?  

 

All of these questions make a huge difference in the type of ski that people should suggest. 

 

  

post #9 of 26

The kind of boots you own make a difference in what skis you should get?  Seriously?roflmao.gif

post #10 of 26

Come on dude.  That is a terrible reply and you should know better.  This guy is trying to find a good ski.  Matching a ski with the boot is correct.  Maybe not for this guy, but does it make sense to match a weak/soft boot with a stiff ski and vice versa?  But you're probably correct that it doesn't matter here.    

 

I used to work in a shop and I like to know all the pieces before giving advice.  When trying to pick the ideal ski there are so many variables to consider.  Glad that you and your son have had a positive experience on the Elan and Nordica but what does that mean for another guy?  Granted this is not a sales forum and the guy is just looking for a good ski, but there is so much to know to consider when choosing new gear.  With so much info in this community and on the internet that determining what is the "best" is complex.  

 

I could write something as superficial like "consider a Volkl RTM series"  but what's the point of that?  If the goal is to get this guy and all other new/returning skiers to ask different questions and get them thinking before they walk into a store then it seems like all of our advice works.  I'm sure no one wants here to see this guy upsold by some salesperson and that's what I try to avoid with my answer.   

 

Don't you think if you had said I like the Elan and Nordica and explain how your reason matches his skiing style that your answer would have greater depth?  Not trying to be a jerk. 

 

That said, Volkl RTM 80 or 84.  Great on hardpack for back home, adequate in crud and new snow.  Awesome edge control when making medium/longer turn on groomers, and it corners like it's on rails. Load the tail and you can get some explosive turns.  Kind of sluggish in short turns.  The 80 is perfect for now and will give back what you put into it.  The 84 will demand that you be on all the time but gives some room to grow.  Regardless of what you chose they are fun skis that won't let you down.                   

post #11 of 26

Since we now have a super expert on board, I'm done here.  Matching boots and skis, holy crap.  And nowhere did I say he should be either ski, I said "consider."

post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by prinneh View Post
The Dynastar Speed Course Ti still speaks to me as a great ski (plus, I've found them online for ~350 euros with bindings), but I worry about the skis being too groomer oriented for the above mentioned offpiste beginner tour AND whether or not these skis are simply too 'expert' for me to keep up. Also, are they 'too stiff' to ski the moguls? 
 
 

 

I'll speak a little about the Speed Course, I have a set FIS mind you and love them.  BUT....Definitely stiff and need to be worked.  Haven't tried them off piste so I can't comment there, moguls on the other hand they don't seem to like them (mind you I haven't skied to many moguls lately, but when I used too it was with 205 GS race skis which is what I switched from and no problems) so I'll stick with they don't like moguls, just not forgiving enough (can't believe I said that about these skis).

 

The time frame does not really give a good reference as to ability.  If you're a very advanced intermediate, the TI's could be a fun ski front side if you are willing to work a little for it, otherwise I'd go a little more All Mountain in the possibly higher end (and I'm a race ski fan).  More forgiving to learn and ski with.

 

DIN setting is dependent on primarily BSL, WT, HT (or over 50) and LEVEL as a guide for a starting point.  As an experience indicator not so much so.

 

Also, I'm not worried about your size or wt, more so the ability and application and objectives.

 

Provide that and you'll actually get some decent recommendations. There are some very experience and knowledgeable skiers here that can provide answers.

 

BTW I don't race, but for the right skier and application race skis can be great biggrin.gif, down side is they don't forgive you, so you better know if they fit your requirements and that you're ready.

post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by prinneh View Post

The skis on my radar right now are the blizzard bonafides (mainly because the reviews are off the charts) and the Dynastar Speed Course Ti (because I've been told it's a super fun ski, but still a superb carver). 
Neither of these are what I'd call a fun ski for on-piste. The Speed Course Ti is a serious club level race carver, and it expects some skill sets. It will not want to go off piste.

Well, yeah, not off piste, I agree ... but not fun??? I LOVED that ski. I'm smiling just THINKING about it. smile.gif
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm very sorry I haven't replied before. On the first and I think second reply to my thread, I received an email about the reply, since I didn't get any other emails, I assumed there were no other replies - I'll have to fix my subscription settings, I think.
 
Thank you all for all your replies!
 
snofun3 & okenobi: Glad to hear you're all enjoying some snow time with my compatriots. The Danski guys and girls are usually a great bunch and it's one of my favorite danish bureaus to travel with.
 
okenobi: I'm afraid I don't really have to option to demo skis. Would that I had, but it's just not in the cards for this or, probably, the next few years. The Experience 88 is Rossignol, right? The idea I got from reviews was that it was very similar to the dynastar outland series. What is your experience with this ski?
 
mtcyclist: Nordica Steadfast and Elan 888? I'll check those out straight away. Before I started researching I'd never even heard about the Elan brand, but from I've been reading it seems a worthwhile brand - I'll be sure to read more about the Elans during the week. You said 170 cm skis sounded about right for me. I'm used to skiing skis at more like 163-165 cm - is the extra 10 cms because I'm considering allmountain skis (ie. early rise tip) or just because skis have changed more than I've been able to guess at?
 
Beyond: Like qcanoe says later, all I've ever heard is that the dynastar speed course ti is a great and FUN option for on piste. Buying this ski or a ski like it would mean giving up a lot of the offpiste fun. Since I'm a beginner to off-piste, I'm not sure how much an allmountain ski would detract from my enjoyment of the pistes. I've marked down your recommendation of the outland 80 pro, since, to me at least, that looks like a great ski, though I'm unsure about the exact distinction between "livelier" and "damper". Is the Blizzard 8 ti more stiff than the outland pros?
 
wallyk: Oh no! I thought I had learnt from reading other 'recommend me a ski' threads and provided enough information, I was even afraid I'd done an info overload. Here are the answers to all your questions:
 
Q. For example, how do you like to ski fast, medium, cautious? 
A. I ski fast or at least as fast as I think is responsible. I'd say, judging via a gps app on my phone, that I normally ski around 50/km pr. hour, sometimes more, sometimes less.
 
Q.How do you like to turn?  short, medium or long?  
A. I prefer a short to medium turn when I'm skiing by myself or with friends my age, when I'm skiing with parents I try to stick to medium, but I'd say I only ski medium turns when I'm slowing down. I should clarify this though, as I'm unsure about the lingo: When I say short, I mean like an 'elongated S', rather than a 'wide S'. Since I've been a few borrowed and/or rented skis, I try to find the sweet spot of the ski where you can feel the ski powering/guiding you into the next turn.... Although having grown up on more traditional, errr, non-carving skis, I'm very aware that my legs are a little too close together and I am constantly looking to improve my carving.
 
Q. Do you jam in and out of the fall line or do you like to cruise?  Do you want to mix it up?
A. Unless it's a seriously steep hill, I'll ski the fallline. 
 
Q. Do you want to ski in a laid back tempo and relax, or do you want to work while you ski?  
A. I don't mind working, in fact I quite enjoy it. I only ski laid back/relaxed either at the end of a long day or if I'm waiting for others.
 
Q. Who do you ski with?  
A. A lot of different people, some beginners and some experts. I honestly can't say, but maybe mostly with skiers around my own level.
 
Q. What are your goals for skiing? Ski faster, more technically proficient?
A. More technically proficient. I enjoy skiing fast, but I am always trying to improve style and technique.
 
Q. You also mention skiing groomers.  Where do you ski on the groomers?  Center of the trail, or the edges?
A. This is a hard one, but basically it depends on the hill. I'm not sure there's always the greatest of differences, but thinking about it, I mostly ski right along the edges, though if I have the entire hill to myself, I'll ski whereever the snow looks best.
 
Q. You talk about skiing boiler plate when your at home. Is this the place where you do most of your skiing?  How many days do you really think you'll spend skiing in those ideal conditions vs the vacation trips? Are you confident on those conditions?
A. I said either boilerplate or very soft. It's mostly snow cannon snow, either icy hardpacked and crystalised snowsoft (like sand?). On my coming holiday, I remain extremely sure on great conditions, but I can't speak for the snow on the holiday after that. I'd rather be on the side of caution on this one and say I ski mostly mixed conditions? This is also one of the reasons I'm both considering the allmountain ski and dreading it, since I fear the tip would not be the best of crud busters?
 
Q. What kind of boots do you own?
A. A pair of Lange. They are 5 years old but they fit and I enjoy them. They're a little hard coming on, but once they're on they're fine. I added a custom-molded sole a year or two ago and that really made all the difference. I'm aware boots is a very touchy subject here, but I can afford a new pair of skis, but not also a new pair of boots. Some may think this is a wrong way to prioritize, but it means a difference of 1-3 hours of skiiing everytime I take a daytrip. Having to rent or bringing your own, that is. 
 
Q. What is your budget?
A. This is a hard one, as skis are priced seemingly a lot different in different countries. I'd say my limit is around 4500 dkk, which is around 600 euros or 820 dollars. This should include sticks and bindings though.
 
Wallyk #2: I'll also be sure to look into the Vökl RTM 80. I like your description and it sounds like you really know your stuff :) How sluggish are they in the short turns? Would you still recommend them after having read the answers above?
 
oldschoolskier: I'm sorry I haven't provided enough information. I've tried to define my ability to the best of my descriptive ability, and I hope I supplied my objectives in the answers to the above questions. Application though, I'm not sure what that entails. If you tell me, I'll answer you right away! I supplied my DIN not to confuse, but because I tried to give any info I could think of. I enjoyed reading your notes on the Dynastar Speed Course Ti, it sounds like I might be better off with an allmountain ski, as just racing _all_ the time doesn't in all honesty sound like me (despite the need for speed). What initially turned me on to the speed course was the descriptions of it being like a racing carver, but also a sort of, as one reviewer put it, a wolf in sheeps clothing and an extremely fun ski to improve on. And since I enjoy bumps but find them difficult (mainly because they're kinda rare in europe? or maybe I don't seek them out actively?), I know now that I might have to find something a bit more forgiving.
 
again, thank you everyone for your replies. Buying skis is a learning experience to be sure :)

Edited by prinneh - 2/3/13 at 1:58pm
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallyk View Post

Come on dude.  That is a terrible reply and you should know better.    Matching a ski with the boot is correct.     

rolleyes.gif

 

 

 

 

roflmao.gif

 

 

 

 

ROTF.gif

 

 

 

 

 

nonono2.gif

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by prinneh View Post

I'm very sorry I haven't replied before. On the first and I think second reply to my thread, I received an email about the reply, since I didn't get any other emails, I assumed there were no other replies - I'll have to fix my subscription settings, I think.
 
Thank you all for all your replies!
 
snofun3 & okenobi: Glad to hear you're all enjoying some snow time with my compatriots. The Danski guys and girls are usually a great bunch and it's one of my favorite danish bureaus to travel with.
 
okenobi: I'm afraid I don't really have to option to demo skis. Would that I had, but it's just not in the cards for this or, probably, the next few years. The Experience 88 is Rossignol, right? The idea I got from reviews was that it was very similar to the dynastar outland series. What is your experience with this ski?
 
mtcyclist: Nordica Steadfast and Elan 888? I'll check those out straight away. Before I started researching I'd never even heard about the Elan brand, but from I've been reading it seems a worthwhile brand - I'll be sure to read more about the Elans during the week. You said 170 cm skis sounded about right for me. I'm used to skiing skis at more like 163-165 cm - is the extra 10 cms because I'm considering allmountain skis (ie. early rise tip) or just because skis have changed more than I've been able to guess at?
 
Beyond: Like qcanoe says later, all I've ever heard is that the dynastar speed course ti is a great and FUN option for on piste. Buying this ski or a ski like it would mean giving up a lot of the offpiste fun. Since I'm a beginner to off-piste, I'm not sure how much an allmountain ski would detract from my enjoyment of the pistes. I've marked down your recommendation of the outland 80 pro, since, to me at least, that looks like a great ski, though I'm unsure about the exact distinction between "livelier" and "damper". Is the Blizzard 8 ti more stiff than the outland pros?
 
wallyk: Oh no! I thought I had learnt from reading other 'recommend me a ski' threads and provided enough information, I was even afraid I'd done an info overload. Here are the answers to all your questions:
 
Q. For example, how do you like to ski fast, medium, cautious? 
A. I ski fast or at least as fast as I think is responsible. I'd say, judging via a gps app on my phone, that I normally ski around 50/km pr. hour, sometimes more, sometimes less.
 
Q.How do you like to turn?  short, medium or long?  
A. I prefer a short to medium turn when I'm skiing by myself or with friends my age, when I'm skiing with parents I try to stick to medium, but I'd say I only ski medium turns when I'm slowing down. I should clarify this though, as I'm unsure about the lingo: When I say short, I mean like an 'elongated S', rather than a 'wide S'. Since I've been a few borrowed and/or rented skis, I try to find the sweet spot of the ski where you can feel the ski powering/guiding you into the next turn.... Although having grown up on more traditional, errr, non-carving skis, I'm very aware that my legs are a little too close together and I am constantly looking to improve my carving.
 
Q. Do you jam in and out of the fall line or do you like to cruise?  Do you want to mix it up?
A. Unless it's a seriously steep hill, I'll ski the fallline. 
 
Q. Do you want to ski in a laid back tempo and relax, or do you want to work while you ski?  
A. I don't mind working, in fact I quite enjoy it. I only ski laid back/relaxed either at the end of a long day or if I'm waiting for others.
 
Q. Who do you ski with?  
A. A lot of different people, some beginners and some experts. I honestly can't say, but maybe mostly with skiers around my own level.
 
Q. What are your goals for skiing? Ski faster, more technically proficient?
A. More technically proficient. I enjoy skiing fast, but I am always trying to improve style and technique.
 
Q. You also mention skiing groomers.  Where do you ski on the groomers?  Center of the trail, or the edges?
A. This is a hard one, but basically it depends on the hill. I'm not sure there's always the greatest of differences, but thinking about it, I mostly ski right along the edges, though if I have the entire hill to myself, I'll ski whereever the snow looks best.
 
Q. You talk about skiing boiler plate when your at home. Is this the place where you do most of your skiing?  How many days do you really think you'll spend skiing in those ideal conditions vs the vacation trips? Are you confident on those conditions?
A. I said either boilerplate or very soft. It's mostly snow cannon snow, either icy hardpacked and crystalised snowsoft (like sand?). On my coming holiday, I remain extremely sure on great conditions, but I can't speak for the snow on the holiday after that. I'd rather be on the side of caution on this one and say I ski mostly mixed conditions? This is also one of the reasons I'm both considering the allmountain ski and dreading it, since I fear the tip would not be the best of crud busters?
 
Q. What kind of boots do you own?
A. A pair of Lange. They are 5 years old but they fit and I enjoy them. They're a little hard coming on, but once they're on they're fine. I added a custom-molded sole a year or two ago and that really made all the difference. I'm aware boots is a very touchy subject here, but I can afford a new pair of skis, but not also a new pair of boots. Some may think this is a wrong way to prioritize, but it means a difference of 1-3 hours of skiiing everytime I take a daytrip. Having to rent or bringing your own, that is. 
 
Q. What is your budget?
A. This is a hard one, as skis are priced seemingly a lot different in different countries. I'd say my limit is around 4500 dkk, which is around 600 euros or 820 dollars. This should include sticks and bindings though.
 
Wallyk #2: I'll also be sure to look into the Vökl RTM 80. I like your description and it sounds like you really know your stuff :) How sluggish are they in the short turns? Would you still recommend them after having read the answers above?
 
oldschoolskier: I'm sorry I haven't provided enough information. I've tried to define my ability to the best of my descriptive ability, and I hope I supplied my objectives in the answers to the above questions. Application though, I'm not sure what that entails. If you tell me, I'll answer you right away! I supplied my DIN not to confuse, but because I tried to give any info I could think of. I enjoyed reading your notes on the Dynastar Speed Course Ti, it sounds like I might be better off with an allmountain ski, as just racing _all_ the time doesn't in all honesty sound like me (despite the need for speed). What initially turned me on to the speed course was the descriptions of it being like a racing carver, but also a sort of, as one reviewer put it, a wolf in sheeps clothing and an extremely fun ski to improve on. And since I enjoy bumps but find them difficult (mainly because they're kinda rare in europe? or maybe I don't seek them out actively?), I know now that I might have to find something a bit more forgiving.
 
again, thank you everyone for your replies. Buying skis is a learning experience to be sure :)

For the Course Ti your boot might be a bit soft.  I'd likely suggest something more into 100-120 (depending on strength and agressiveness).  My 15 year nephew (same size and wt) who is skiing my old boots which are about 150-160 and is enjoying every minute (on a similar ski to the Ti).  So I would put boots on your list for the not to distant future.

 

Otherwise, yes a wolf in sheep's clothing would be a good description.  As you lean towards the higher end of the performance scale remember they occasionally bite back (of course the Ti less so).  Based on your answers, it could very well be a good  (and challenging ski at the beginning) for you as it will likely do most of what you want and have top end to spare for growth.  I believe the Ti have about a 17-18m radius best described as a Glolam ski (sort a half way between the GS and SL).  It is a not a full blown race as it does not have the the top metal plate is my understanding (hence a little more flexible and pleasant).  This is sort of a high performance do it all kinda ski (at least on hard pack/groomed conditions),  good enough to race with, forgiving enough not to be perfect all the time. 

 

Conditions...well good edge tune can make any ski great or bad if its poor.

 

Speed, as long as you can stop in time, are controlled, responsible and respectful of the skiers and boards around you great.  Skis like this will encourage you to go faster biggrin.gif.

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

For the Course Ti your boot might be a bit soft.  I'd likely suggest something more into 100-120 (depending on strength and agressiveness).  My 15 year nephew (same size and wt) who is skiing my old boots which are about 150-160 and is enjoying every minute (on a similar ski to the Ti).  So I would put boots on your list for the not to distant future.

 

Otherwise, yes a wolf in sheep's clothing would be a good description.  As you lean towards the higher end of the performance scale remember they occasionally bite back (of course the Ti less so).  Based on your answers, it could very well be a good  (and challenging ski at the beginning) for you as it will likely do most of what you want and have top end to spare for growth.  I believe the Ti have about a 17-18m radius best described as a Glolam ski (sort a half way between the GS and SL).  It is a not a full blown race as it does not have the the top metal plate is my understanding (hence a little more flexible and pleasant).  This is sort of a high performance do it all kinda ski (at least on hard pack/groomed conditions),  good enough to race with, forgiving enough not to be perfect all the time. 

 

Conditions...well good edge tune can make any ski great or bad if its poor.

 

Speed, as long as you can stop in time, are controlled, responsible and respectful of the skiers and boards around you great.  Skis like this will encourage you to go faster biggrin.gif.

 

 

Great advice by oldschoolskier.  Really good advice.  That Lange boot may not be aggressive enough to maximize the Volkl 84 or the CourseTi and that's important.  You don't want to spend your hard earned money on a ski that your not going to enjoy or will find frustrating.  Remember this: buying skis should be fun.  Skiing should be fun.  Try not to get lost in the details and to over analyze the experience.  If you feel that purchasing a ski is the best allocation of your money then do it.  No one knows your finances and time allocation better than you.  

 

That said, consider the Volkl RTM 80 and the RTM 77.  The 77 is similar to the other models mentioned but a little bit more forgiving.  You will get back what you put into the ski and you will have fun with both.  Remember this: If you're a competent and proficient skier then you can use any ski any where.  Given the boot you have you should be able to get maximum performance from the Volkl.  I use a beginner Rossi Avenger 72 to teach my daughter on hard pack, man made, icy east coast conditions.  But I can make this ski sing and do what I want and enjoy the sport and my time outdoors.  It's not a high performance ski but that's OK.  

 

For whatever reason there's a natural inclination for many users in this community to discuss the many different skis for the many different conditions they ski.  There's also a propensity for many to provide shallow, and incomplete advice.  At this stage, many members have provided good comments and suggestions.  Using the list above, I would recommend that you consider not more than 3-4 skis, go talk to a sales person, and then execute and buy.  Get the boot mounted, and go have fun.  It's that easy.    

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallyk View Post

Dude your from Florida.  How do you expect to be taken seriously?

 

I'd have to ask the same about someone who:

 

  • Can't differentiate between "your" and "you're"
  • Has insulted multiple other posters in this thread already

 

I know someone on Epic who lives in FL but spends a month skiing in Vail every season.  So... yeah.  Try not making ill-founded assumptions about people you don't know and insulting people you disagree with.  You'll probably get farther that way.

post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallyk View Post

Dude your from Florida.  How do you expect to be taken seriously?  It's pretty difficult to take equipment/buying advice from someone who has their location listed as Boca Raton.  Stick to golf, water skiing and sailing.     

 

Currently have three quivers of about 10 pairs of high end skis living in SLC, WB and least coast.

 

So far 17 days in 3 trips at WB, next week is SLC, then first week of March is Verbier for 9 days, then back to either WB or SLC for second half of March. Probably another 45-55 day season as has been the case for the past decade. Also 40+ years living/skiing the least coast before moving south. And your season has been what? And where do YOU live?

 

Speaking of being taken seriously, before you say more stupid things about boot and ski matching or where people live, maybe stick around a bit and learn. Or not.

post #20 of 26

I'm beginning to believe that PlugBoot, aka Vitamin aka Bored has managed to sneak back in and is trying to see, once again, how nasty he can be prior to getting thrown out the door.nonono2.gif

post #21 of 26

I would recommend Line Influence 105 in size 179 

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallyk View Post

So you have a lot of money, ski at Vail and have 10 pairs of high end skis.  Wow. This community should be just so impressed with you and fortunate to have a self proclaimed wealthy big shot to offer their valuable insights.  Anyone who brags openly about how many high end skis they have and all the fancy destinations they travel to must a real authority.  

 

After working inside the industry for a long time I can say with confidence "you're definitely that guy."          

 

FYI, WB and SLC aren't Vail (just sayin' rolleyes.gif). Right, so who's the clueless one here.

 

You make a point of how someone who lives in Boca couldn't possibly know, after being outed on ski and boot matching ROTF.gif (right, get the red ones)  yet when I point out that I have an arsenal of pretty good stuff gleaned from 40+ years of doing this, and enjoy going to good destinations, you resort to personal attacks.

 

For only 19 posts, you've already made yourself asswipe of the month - or like you say, "that guy". Oh, so where was it YOU live, and what's you season been like? (I betting 4 days at Stratton). You've worked in the industry a long time and want ski and boot matching. Apparently you're not real good at it.

post #23 of 26

Yup, definitely PlugBoot or his twin.

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by wallyk View Post

Doesn't matter about Vail because you're so that guy.  That last post was awesome.  The entertainment value from your rants that go a long way to show just how much money you have is great.  I love you man, but you're that guy and nothing can change it.  You always will be that guy.  Thanks for making my afternoon.  

 

Remember: you're that guy.         

 

I'm sure that this will be the last post from you for some time.  Early bird dinner starts at 4ish?  Enjoy.  

 

    


Still waiting on your location and season. For someone with such an attitude you'd figure it would be impressive. Apparently as impressive as your boot/ski matching skill - roflmao.gif.

 

Lots of assumptions already. For someone who demonstably don't have much of a clue, that's not a real good mix.

post #25 of 26

WallyK restricted from thread...does not play well with others.

 

(hint: if you're throwing insults rather than staying on topic, you're doing it wrong)

 

post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

WallyK restricted from thread...does not play well with others.

 

Thank you.

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