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Waxes for various temperatures

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I just waxed my skis for tomorrow. Checked the temperatures and saw a low of around 22 and a high around 30, so I slathered on the Swix Red Wax since it's temperature range is 25 - 35.


Now, say Sunday's high will be 22. Do I need to rewax and put the Violet?

In essence, how picky does a non-racer guy need to be about using the right color wax for the temperature.

 

post #2 of 15

I have been very very pleased with the Maplus Race Base Medium Wax for a great high quality universal wax. Eliminates the need to change waxes for small changes in snow temps. Great glide, long durability and very broad temp range. Works great from -5f to 30F. I use it for Masters Racings as well as freeskiing.Available from      slidewright.com                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Medium hard paraffin, 250 grams, snow temperature -15 to -5 degrees C (-5 to 23 degrees F). Ideal as an initial base prep wax when snow temperature is warm, a first wax after stonegrinding base or ideal as a travel wax to protect the base when in transit. High quality, high melt point paraffin that is economial as a first layer before applying condition specific wax. Also, good as a universal wax and recommended for shops and DIYers.

This is also an excellent all-purpose, universal wax with at least twice the durability of other universal waxes and a broader usable range than indicated. It's a great value and reduces the number of times you'll need to wax. It's one of our favorites for these reasons......plus it's fast!

post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post

 


Now, say Sunday's high will be 22. Do I need to rewax and put the Violet?

 

 

If there was fresh snow, then you will want the harder wax, yes.        If there is no fresh snow during the cold snap, and if you're not on high-angle carving  or race skis, you can get away with using what you have on already - just brush it out really, really well.

 

The obvious signs for non-racers that the wax is too warm are, in increasing order of severity: squeaky skis, slow skis on runouts,  'sandpaper' feel base, greyish or whitish friction damage on bases.

 

The B/M race base medium is good stuff and durable; when you run out of CH7 it would make a good replacement - it's slightly pricier but it can go well into CH6 temp ranges and it lasts.

post #4 of 15

Honestly? For alpine, it really doesn't matter much. There's more then enough gravity to do its work. Sure you are slower, but you can still ski normally. For xc, things are a bit different, but still few degrees off, won't ruin your ski day.

As I wrote in some other thread, nowadays (when my WC days are over) I wax with single wax, no matter what temperature and snow is. Skis are well maintained this way, and that's what matters. If you are few seconds slower, it doesn't matter as long as you don't race.

But that's just my opinion :)

post #5 of 15

Primoz,

 

I have to disagree....

 

Last night I was having a fine night skiing so whatever wax the honey put on was operating just fine... right up until the last run when I hit the snow the snow maker was blowing and I went along with gravity and my skis didn't.  I was very close to making a face plant but managed to recover.  Honey said it was because I hit the new snow and the wax was not the appropriate wax for it.

 

I have to say that was a pretty disconcerting experience to suddenly feel my skis jerk to an abrupt slow down. 

post #6 of 15

Can you get by with only one wax regardless of temperature/conditions? Sure. But why would you? It isn't much harder to pick a wax which is about right for the skiing and you get better glide and have a better day. No reason for someone just out for fun to be worrying about just the right mix of additives, fluoros, etc. But is it really that much simpler to have one wax instead of 3 or 4? You get a pretty good payoff for what seems to me at least a very minor extra investment of time and no real extra effort.

post #7 of 15

Billieryder that's a bit extreme situation, which you normally never face. Thing is, snow straight out of snowgun is completely different material and can hardly be even called snow. You never ski on such snow, since this snow is always at least partially transformed when they "drive" over with pistenbullies, preparing track. Normally areas where high and low pressure snowguns are operating, are closed for skiing (except those where hmm... we call these things giraffe... it's few meters high tower where snow is falling from top down like from "shower"), so you normally don't ski on such snow.

 

Vsirin yes it's easy to pick about right wax, but only if you are waxing on morning when you go skiing, or maybe on evening previous day. Normally I don't do this. I wax skis after I come back from skiing, leave wax on, and I just scrap it off before I go skiing. Even with my experience it's pretty much impossible to know, what wax will do fine in 3 days, especially with weird weather we have last 2 winters.

post #8 of 15

My suggestion has been to try a high quality wax that works great over a much wider temp range. The inexpensive Universal Waxes work OK but may not offer good glide or durability. I have been pleased with the Maplus RBM for snow temps of -5f to 30f. Also provides great glide and long durability (do not need to wax as often). There may be a better choice out there, I have not found it yet.

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

snow straight out of snowgun is completely different material and can hardly be even called snow. You never ski on such snow, since this snow is always at least partially transformed when they "drive" over with pistenbullies, preparing track. Normally areas where high and low pressure snowguns are operating, are closed for skiing (except those where hmm... we call these things giraffe... it's few meters high tower where snow is falling from top down like from "shower"), so you normally don't ski on such snow.

 

Primoz, you probably don't encounter them much on your WC travels, but there are an unfortunately large number of east coast (US) mountains that blow snow every chance they get early in the season and it is possible to encounter these conditions pretty often. On the smaller mountains, they very often do not close the trails when snowmaking especially for night skiing (skiing one of these trails can be a cold and very wet experience for face, goggles, etc.) On the mountains that blow snow every night, you are often encountering the same kind of snow and that can have more impact on wax choice than the temperature. Unfortunately, different mountains use different formulas and different equipment for their snowmaking and the water content of the snow they make varies with the air temp. The snow tends to vary from mildly abrasive to super abrasive almost sand texture. Some mountains make very wet snow even when it is cold. Some produce pretty dry snow. There often seems to be a wax that works best for a given mountain and the trick is identifying it.

post #10 of 15

I have good luck with Hertel's FC-739 all temp.  Check their website.

 

There are an awfull lot of waxes out there to try.
 

post #11 of 15

Vsirin ok I apologize then for wrong statement :) Here in Europe, they normally close area around snow guns (except for those previously mentioned ones), since if conditions are normal, you get 0.5-1m high "hill" around gun pretty fast, and skiing there would be dangerous (imagine hitting 1m high bump on middle of flat groomer). If they don't do this, they normally direct guns off the course, and they spread snow with pistenbullies to course later on evening. But obviously things are different over there, and I didn't know this.

post #12 of 15

I'm not sure where in Montana you are but I have been using Maplus Universal Lo-Flo wax for years with great results in the Bozeman area. You can have 20+ degree variances in temperature skiing the 4000 vertical feet at Big Sky and the Maplus Universal Lo-Flo has worked great there. If I don't know what the temperature is going to be I just mix the cold and warm together and usually have great results.  You can find it at:

 

http://www.slidewright.com/briko-maplus-universal-low-fluoro-solid-ski-and-snowboard-wax-100gr_mw0696.html?cat=20

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Skier View Post
 

I just waxed my skis for tomorrow. Checked the temperatures and saw a low of around 22 and a high around 30, so I slathered on the Swix Red Wax since it's temperature range is 25 - 35.


Now, say Sunday's high will be 22. Do I need to rewax and put the Violet?

In essence, how picky does a non-racer guy need to be about using the right color wax for the temperature.

 


One important thing to remember is that snow temps. do not change as much as air temps.  Chances are that if air goes from 22 to 30 F in a given day that the snow temps. will not vary much at all.  The most change of snow temps. would be on an East to South East facing slope.  On a North or North West facing slope the snow temps may not change at all given those air temps.

Honestly, with those temps. I would just use Dominator's  Zoom series of waxes and not worry about changing at all.  Then again, you might be better off just using the violet even when the air hits 30 degrees.  Then again, Swix relates to air temps. rather than snow, so maybe just ski in the air!  ;-)

post #14 of 15

Hertel super hot sauce. Cheap and all temp. I use it year round. 

post #15 of 15

^ This.  I have had great results with hotsauce and have been using it exclusively for a couple of years.  The only time I have had any issues is when it was well below zero (Gotta love Wisconsin) but I don't know of any universal wax that wouldn't be slow in those temps.

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