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Problem: Man made snow sticking to goggles

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I've almost run into people or fallen a few times this season as a result of machine made snow sticking to my goggles. It forms 'drops' of ice which make it impossible to see clearly.

 

Does anyone have an idea of how to treat my goggles to keep this from happening?

 

Or is there a brand of goggle, or type of lens that doesn't allow the machine muck to stick and freeze?

post #2 of 29

Skigee

post #3 of 29

skigee +1

post #4 of 29

Skigee on one of those little retractable reels people put ID badges and the like on and hang it off a jacket-front zipper. Much more convenient than trying to keep it wrapped around your thumb.

post #5 of 29

This thread sent me on a quest for the ski gee. 

 

 

 

Found it at Daddy's Board Shop for $1.99 delivered.  I ordered two and got free shipping!

post #6 of 29

CR, you need a sticky thread: shopping on the cheap.  wink.gif  That shop probably lost money on you. And yet I surpass you on this one item. I found them at a liquidation sale for .25 and bought 8 for the price you paid for one. hahahaha

 

If you wear them on your thumb, you can squeegee wile you are skiing without missing a beat. But you have to have the right shape of glove.

post #7 of 29

I have leki poles with the trigger grip so I use the strap to hold it.  When not in use I tuck it under the strap on my palm.  Works great and it is already in my hand.

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

I've almost run into people or fallen a few times this season as a result of machine made snow sticking to my goggles. It forms 'drops' of ice which make it impossible to see clearly.

 

Does anyone have an idea of how to treat my goggles to keep this from happening?

 

Or is there a brand of goggle, or type of lens that doesn't allow the machine muck to stick and freeze?


Excuse me, but how are you getting gunned snow on your goggles? It generally stays on the ground once it falls. I would suggest you avoid skiing past the guns when they're operating.

post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post


Excuse me, but how are you getting gunned snow on your goggles? It generally stays on the ground once it falls. I would suggest you avoid skiing past the guns when they're operating.

 

The trails where they're blowing most often have the best snow on the mountain. When they're blowing on open terrain, it generally means they don't have a lot of terrain to begin with. This means you only have a few options, and most of those will be skied out and crowded. The trails they're blowing on obviously have fresh snow on them, and they'll have much less traffic, since most people will avoid the blowing guns.

post #10 of 29
I just shield my goggle with my hand temporarily while going through the mist.
post #11 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post


Excuse me, but how are you getting gunned snow on your goggles? It generally stays on the ground once it falls. I would suggest you avoid skiing past the guns when they're operating.

It isn't always by choice.  Sometimes you get frosted on the chair lift.  I was at Stratten early season at a race clinic and you had to ski through the guns to get to were the gates were set.  I've also started down trails with no guns going to find out there are guns blazing at the bottom of the trail.

 

It cost $2.00 and is a bit easier than picking and choosing which trail is goggle safe.

post #12 of 29

When there's only one WROD open and it looks like this top to bottom including the lift towers you're going to be clearing ice off your goggles every 90 seconds no matter what precautions you try to take..

 

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

 

Does anyone have an idea of how to treat my goggles to keep this from happening?

 

 

The smartass in me says treat your goggles to someplace with natural snow.

 

I know, not helpful.

post #14 of 29

Would something like Rain-x on the lens or those silicone cloths to wipe the lens before going out make a difference?

post #15 of 29

I doubt it. It is ice, not water.  I've never tried it so I don't know.

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

When there's only one WROD open and it looks like this top to bottom including the lift towers you're going to be clearing ice off your goggles every 90 seconds no matter what precautions you try to take..

 

And is usually when the best clinics are (if you weigh cost in). 

post #17 of 29

I have Convert gloves that have a squeegee build in to the index finger...works fantastic for clearing snow and water from the goggles.

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 

Once again, Epicski.com wiped out a message I was typing

post #19 of 29

I have a Skigee but what I've found to work even better against ice (because it's more rigid) is a plastic card, such as an expired credit card, library card, membership card, etc. I punched a hole in the corner with a hole punch and attached the card to one of those retractable pass keepers. I've been meaning to glue some sort of microfiber or similar fabric to one edge for wiping away water drops.

post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

I have a Skigee but what I've found to work even better against ice (because it's more rigid) is a plastic card, such as an expired credit card, library card, membership card, etc. I punched a hole in the corner with a hole punch and attached the card to one of those retractable pass keepers. I've been meaning to glue some sort of microfiber or similar fabric to one edge for wiping away water drops.

 

The problem with a plastic card like that is that it will scratch the lenses of your goggles. If you're using $20 Gordinis, no big deal. But when the lens of your goggles costs $75, you may be a little more hesitant to use something harsh like that. A Skigee works pretty well, and won't scratch your lenses. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GorgeSkier View Post

Would something like Rain-x on the lens or those silicone cloths to wipe the lens before going out make a difference?

 

I haven't tried anything like that, but I doubt it would make a difference. The way snow guns work, the water freezes on contact, so just having RainX wouldn't do much good. The other issue is that RainX is made for glass surfaces. The lenses of goggles are plastic, and the chemicals in the RainX could very easily destroy the plastic of the lens. 

 

I'm very particular about my goggles, if you haven't noticed. I've had lenses last for well over 5 years before by taking care of them. Always using a goggle bag or goggle cloth to wipe them down, never using solvents on them, and never ever using paper to wipe them. 

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post. I punched a hole in the corner with a hole punch and attached the card to one of those retractable pass keepers. I've been meaning to glue some sort of microfiber or similar fabric to one edge for wiping away water drops.

 

bolide on this board used to have an actual SkiGee on a retractable pass keeper in a sleeve pocket for quick & stealthy deployment.

post #22 of 29

I'm glad that I don't have to ski through a frozen mist like that...........  So, who is going to invent a heated goggle lens so that crud never has a chance to freeze?  

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

The other issue is that RainX is made for glass surfaces. The lenses of goggles are plastic, and the chemicals in the RainX could very easily destroy the plastic of the lens. 

Rainx will work on plastic, I think it's just alcohol and silicone, nothing that will hurt plastic. Never tried it on ski goggles though so take it for what it's worth.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

bolide on this board used to have an actual SkiGee on a retractable pass keeper in a sleeve pocket for quick & stealthy deployment.

 

I've used the Skigee on the pass keeper attached to my pocket, but the flexible plastic doesn't always scrape away the ice particles.  

 

I glued a strip of chamois to my scraper card and got to test it out today in freezing fog.  It worked pretty well. Hard edge for ice, chamois to wipe away drops of water.

 

Freeski, I've been using the card for the past couple of seasons and I haven't noticed it putting any scratches on the lenses (Oakleys, Smiths).  You don't have to apply a lot of pressure against the lens for it to work. Besides, I replace my goggles or at least get new lenses every season so even if it did get scratched up I'd be okay with it. I'd rather have visibility when I need it so I don't accidentally huck a cliff or nail a tree.

 

 

post #25 of 29

Cover your goggles up with your hand or just lean your head down when you're going past the guns. My gloves have a little goggle wipe on the thumb, which is nice, but I don't think it really matters. Unless your gloves have excessive amounts of zippers I don't think that the fabric is gonna scratch your goggles even if you don't have one of these things. 

 

My biggest fear has always been coming into a fresh patch of man made snow at speed and just wrecking my knees when my weight shifts drastically forward. I'm sure that just slowing down would be fine, and in 27 seasons of skiing I've never actually had anything happen...but that doesn't stop me from thinking about it almost every time.

post #26 of 29

I had this problem very suddenly on Sunday, on the Superstar run at Killington where they had been blowing snow for several days. I skied through the cloud, and my goggles instantly became completely opaque. I had to stop abruptly as I was on a steep pitch. I spent nearly all of the previous two days on that run, including going through the blowing snow, but it had never stuck in the fashion. Not sure whether a change in temperature or wind was involved.

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 

Exactly.

The blown stuff turned to ice immediately upon contact, making Skigee or anything like it useless.

 

That was why I was thinking of treating the lens in some way, to keep the ice from sticking, and thus forming a layer, on the goggles.

 

The next time I skied the same guns were running, but ice didn't form on my goggles. There must have been something about the particular conditions that day which made it happen.

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phlogiston View Post

Exactly.

The blown stuff turned to ice immediately upon contact, making Skigee or anything like it useless.

 

That was why I was thinking of treating the lens in some way, to keep the ice from sticking, and thus forming a layer, on the goggles.

 

The next time I skied the same guns were running, but ice didn't form on my goggles. There must have been something about the particular conditions that day which made it happen.

 

Have you tried it or are you guessing?  I ask because it sounded like you hadn't tried anything yet.  Granted, it would be nice if a chemical like rainx caused the frosting to just evaporate, but that isn't what happens on my car's windshield so I doubt it would work on goggles.

 

As for why it sticks some days more than others; there are a few factors in play,  humidity and temperature probably are the biggest.  Not just the air's humidity but the water content in the snow from the snow gun's too.  I "think" dryer sticks less.

post #29 of 29

At a certain temperature/humidity rainx doesn't do anything to prevent snow or sleet from sticking to my windshield.  I'd think that that just turning from water to ice crystal moisture from the snow guns is going to stick to your goggles no matter what you try to treat them with.  Perhaps those breakaway goggle strips that motocross racers use in muddy conditions could transfer to skiing.  Wouldn't it be awesome for those things to be blowing all over the mountain?  Looks like the latest version is on reels.

 

Redraven Speedview Goggle System

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