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Time to get new skis?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone. I'm new here. I live in Colorado and ski Winter Park. I'm an intermediate. I've taken many, many group and individual lessons, and I've skied about 90 times over the past four years and love it! I have a question. I've been skiing on Volkl Luna's, 149s and wonder whether I should get something else or the same ski but just longer. I do have custom fitted boots that work great. I'm only 5'2" and 146 lbs but athletic. I loved these skis when I first got them last year but this year, I'm having trouble getting them to move as they just seem sluggish. They were recently tuned and waxed a week ago. So I don't know if I should just get longer skis or try something totally different. I do like Volkswagen so far. Help anyone?
post #2 of 8
If you're taking a lot of lessons, ask one of your coaches what s/he thinks, since that person has seen you ski. Just a thought.
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
I did ask but the instructors don't want to talk to any one person about gear. Most of my recent lessons were in the intermediate blue/blue-black group class. All I got was "you could try a longer ski and see how it goes". That didn't seem very helpful to me.
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by colorado girl View Post

I did ask but the instructors don't want to talk to any one person about gear. Most of my recent lessons were in the intermediate blue/blue-black group class. All I got was "you could try a longer ski and see how it goes". That didn't seem very helpful to me.

 

Okay, well, when you say "I'm having trouble getting them to move as they just seem sluggish," are you saying that they literally don't want to slide down (or across) the hill easily? Because if that's what you're saying, you definitely got the wrong wax for the snow conditions or whatever; it's almost certainly not the ski itself. Tunes that are not right for the conditions or skier can happen.

 

On the other hand, if you're saying that they're sluggish to turn, then a post on the instruction and technique forum might get you better guidance than here on the equipment page, even if it leads you back here in the end.

 

Meanwhile there are a bunch of very helpful and knowledgeable women on this site who, I expect, will see your post in the next couple days or so and respond to you with probably better advice than I could give. BTW, good move on getting a good boot fit up front. smile.gif

post #5 of 8

At this point you need to ask yourself some questions--are you content to stay on groomers, and if so do you want to be able to ski steeper runs or ski faster than you are now.  Are you thinking about getting off piste--bumps, powder?  The answers to these questions will help you decide what kind of ski--carver, narrower all mountain, wider all mountain--you're looking for.  Magazine gear guides give a very good overview of the spectrum of skis available (although the names of the categories change every year).  This years Skiing Magazine seems to have a pretty good gear review. The skis reviewed will be advanced intermediate through expert.  The beauty of modern skis is that many of them are equally appropriate for improving intermediates through advanced or even expert--although different levels may use different lengths.  Some skis are more appropriate for different size skiers and the descriptions of each ski will let you know if a ski is more appropriate for a heavy, aggressive skier or a lighter, less aggressive skier.  The reviews should give you a handful of skis to consider.  If possible demo a few skis.  When you say you're taking a lot of group and individual lessons over four years you might spend some of the money on demoing--it usually takes a while for a skier to master skills learned in a lesson before the next lesson, and in my experience group lessons at the intermediate level are not that helpful. Don't buy new skis because you think you should--if you demo a ski and it isn't a big improvement over what you have there's no reason to buy it.  Buy when you find a ski that knocks your socks off. Try different lengths if you can.  (Advanced/expert skiers may buy a ski not to replace what they have but to use in different conditions that their current skis don't handle well--a quiver--but you're not at that point.) You may get some specific ski recommendations here--there are some experts--shop owners--who may give you some good ideas on different skis to try, but most of us will tell you to buy skis that we have and like, without having compared them to a lot of other skis on the market. Also finding a good shop that gives fair, objective, accurate advice will really help narrow down your choices and make a selection. I'm sure some of our Colorado members can advise you on that.

post #6 of 8

Welcome to EpicSki!  Lucky you to live so close to the big mountains.

 

Would you be willing to spend a little money on a personal "demo day"?  Meaning from a shop on mountain so that you could swap out after 2-3 runs to check out a variety of skis on the same runs.  149cm is on the short side.  When doing a demo day, good to try out skis that are long, or even too long.  I find I learn as much or more from being on the "wrong" skis.  Doesn't mean they are bad skis, just means that they aren't a good match for me.

 

In my case, I like any women's ski by Rossignol or Blizzard, but don't like anything from Volkl.  You could easily be the opposite.  I'm 5'0", 115 lbs, and willing to demo anything from 149cm to 162cm.  Depends somewhat on the rocker and width underfoot.  I first went to a free demo day in NC when I was an older skier returning to the slopes after not skiing much for quite a while.  Was surprised now easily I could feel a difference between skis as an intermediate, even if they were a bit long.

Quote:
Originally Posted by colorado girl View Post

Hi everyone. I'm new here. I live in Colorado and ski Winter Park. I'm an intermediate. I've taken many, many group and individual lessons, and I've skied about 90 times over the past four years and love it! I have a question. I've been skiing on Volkl Luna's, 149s and wonder whether I should get something else or the same ski but just longer. I do have custom fitted boots that work great. I'm only 5'2" and 146 lbs but athletic. I loved these skis when I first got them last year but this year, I'm having trouble getting them to move as they just seem sluggish. They were recently tuned and waxed a week ago. So I don't know if I should just get longer skis or try something totally different. I do like Volkswagen so far. Help anyone?
post #7 of 8

Marznc is on the right track. 

Take some time to demo some skis and see if you feel what you want out of a ski. 

Perhaps you need a more advanced ski to match your improving skills. 

 

A few you may want to try: 

Nordica Belle to Belle

Atomic Affinity Storm

Blizzard 8.0

(I'm sure I'll think of some more)

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I appreciate the help. I do need to stay on groomers because I have a very bad right knee, it's to be replaced this year in July. So bumps are out of the question right Now. Someone mentioned that I may not have the right wax. The tech said that he matches the wax with the snow temps found at Winter Park, so I don't think that that is the problem. What I meant by sluggish is that I cant get them to go faster even when Im really pushing them. I race on Volkl racetigers at 151 but I don't use them for anything other than the nastar course. When I have a bit more money, I'll try demoing skis.
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