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What's YOUR Skiing Model? - Page 2

post #31 of 47

Move to engage the ski tips at the top of the turn

Turn shape is round

Inside shoulder, arm, hip and leg lead through the turn

Legs turn under a quiet upper body

Torso generally faces down the hill

Hips face inside the next turn

Pole swing and touch complements the movements of the legs and skis

Look in the direction of your next turn

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post

Hey!  Guess I'm an old school skier.

 

Dontcha just love satori?

I had a jokey post earlier but this thread has generated some serious consideration as well.  At times I surely do keep some mechanical concepts in my conscious mind when I'm clicked in, some of which have been detailed in previous posts here.

 

I guess the majority of my posts here have at least a bit of a jokey aspect but I put this forth with maybe a bit of joke but ultimately it's the model that I strive to attain with every turn.

 

My skiing model is:  free your mind and your ass will follow.

post #33 of 47

  I  for one,  (jokes aside --markojp rolleyes.gif) actually find this thread very interesting.  Seriously,. I can't wait to read responses from the likes of (hopefully) Jasp, Bob Barnes, The Rusty, maybe Skidude,  and others. This could be fun! Hang in there, nolo, I'm sure we'll hear some good things soonwink.gif I like your model so far...let's see what others have to say (constructively)...

 

    zenny

post #34 of 47
As models go, we had STEIN'S and quite a few since then. Joulbert offered his take. PSIA was founded on the idea that function and outcomes are more important than a largely arbitrary final form. At best we can say that is a softer focus nowdays.
post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 

It's scary to set down your beliefs. If you're not a ski instructor, you probably don't need to go there, but I think anyone making a career out of instruction needs to internalize all the books and clinics (their training) into "their own words" or their students will have a trainee teaching them borrowed lessons. 

post #36 of 47

My model:

 

Ski technique is broken down into 5 skills, these are:

 

  1. Stance and Balance;
  2. Pivoting;
  3. Edging;
  4. Pressure Control;
  5. Timing and Co-ordination.

 

We then alter the blend of these skills to achieve our desired outcome (line, turnshape, speed, etc).  

post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillA View Post

Move to engage the ski tips at the top of the turn
Can you please elaborate on that a bit?
post #38 of 47

Interesting thread NOLO.  The variety and similarities are interesting.  Been trying to internalize an answer to this since you started, and nothing really seemed accurate (unless drilling on something).  I stop a lot more than I used to, and think a lot less.  Could that be my truth in skiing anymore, or maybe it's just old age and lazy are setting in?  

 

Incorporating Skills is imperative, you earn those through drills and mileage.  When drilling there is purpose and intent, the below applies more moderately. I drill somewhere on almost every run. This is what I try to do.

 

Mind; left blank.

Focus; absorbing information from all receptors.

Awareness; heightened to prepare or adjust to approaching or encountered conditions.

Body; stabilizing over or onto the skis.

Attitude; enjoying the ride and accepting the results.

post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

My model:

Ski technique is broken down into 5 skills, these are:
  1. Stance and Balance;
  2. Pivoting;
  3. Edging;
  4. Pressure Control;
  5. Timing and Co-ordination.

We then alter the blend of these skills to achieve our desired outcome (line, turnshape, speed, etc).  

Where is tipping? One would think that is a critical skill.
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post


Where is tipping? One would think that is a critical skill.

 

Edging

post #41 of 47

  One of my faves is matching the angle of the slope...during all turn phases. This of course includes appropriate use of angulation and counter--and yet allowing for movement within these, to facilitate changes in turn radius.    Wish I could make this image larger, but I'm dumb. We see Casey Bouius here demonstrating near perfect alignment to the slope at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6...Great to look at!!

 

  

IMG_0305.jpg

    P.s Foot steering

     zenny

post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by zentune View Post

  One of my faves is matching the angle of the slope...during all turn phases. This of course includes appropriate use of angulation and counter--and yet allowing for movement within these, to facilitate changes in turn radius.    Wish I could make this image larger, but I'm dumb. We see Casey Bouius here demonstrating near perfect alignment to the slope at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6...Great to look at!!

 

  

IMG_0305.jpg

    P.s Foot steering

     zenny

Cannot see it Zenny.

post #43 of 47

   Yeah, sorry. Didn't want to transfer from my email for some reasonrolleyes.gif This one of Bob is illustrative as well though in terms of alignment/matching the slope angle.

 

  LL

 

      zenny

post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 

BillA: Look in the direction of your next turn

 

I like the rule of threes (just a name): when you are starting a run give yourself three turns to accelerate; give yourself three turns to come to a stop, and look three turns ahead. 

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

BillA: Look in the direction of your next turn

 

I like the rule of threes (just a name): when you are starting a run give yourself three turns to accelerate; give yourself three turns to come to a stop, and look three turns ahead. 

I like that and would gladly amend my statement to look three turns ahead. Most of the lessons I teach involve people who are not yet skiers and I would be happy if they would just stop looking at their ski tips and focus on becoming aware of what their feet and skis are doing without looking.

post #46 of 47

Strategically:  

 

  I. The biggest problem with skiing is your head is trying to kill you.

 

  II. A good skier is a lazy skier. If you stand in the right place, the hill and the skis will do most of the work.

 

  III. Skiing is a very positive sport, look where you want to go, not where you don't want to go.

 

   IV. When you're driving on a slippery surface you generally don't use the gas, brake, and steering wheel like on/off switches. Likewise most ski movements are progressive and take a definite amount of time to develop.  

 

  V. No matter how much you have perfected an inappropriate move, it's still inappropriate.

 

  VI. When teaching the correct answer to every question is, it depends. 

 

 

 

Tactically:

 

  1. In scary situations don't listen to your head, It's trying to kill you.

 

  2. If you stay ahead of your feet it's easy. Once you start to chase your feet it gets ugly.

      2a. Sometimes it's a whole lot of work to stand in the right place.

      2b. Keep your hands where you can see them. If you're scratching your butt you're in trouble.

 

  3. Ski like you breath. I'm nearly always either inhaling or exhaling, likewise I'm nearly always starting or ending a turn.

 

  4. If you are trying something new and it feels weird, you're probably doing it right.

 

 

 

Most Importantly!!

 

  If you're having fun, you're doing it right.

 

  The more you can apply solid fundamentals the more terrain and snow conditions you can have fun on.

 

  Did I mention that your head is trying to kill you?!

post #47 of 47
Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
.... Ski like you breath. I'm nearly always either inhaling or exhaling, likewise I'm nearly always starting or ending a turn.

 

 

I especially like this one.

The others are good, too.

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