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Is lift grease an inherent risk of the sport? - Page 2

post #31 of 36

My wife sewed a butterfly over a grease spot on her light blue ski jacket. Actually made the jacket look better.

post #32 of 36
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the feedback on this topic. While my initial interest was trying to figure is there was something "special" about Sugar Mountain, I also thought the "inherent risk" language was a little odd. Thanks to CJO for the local insight to the fact that is not a big problem at the area. I live in the Midwest but grew up skiing out West so I realize skiing at Sugar Mountain or another resort in the area may not be overwhelming but hey if I can ski a day anywhere it is a good day.I appreciate all the insights.

post #33 of 36

Walt Schoenknect, the genius behind Mohawk and Mount Snow, built sheet-metal canopies over the chairs in his clunky old chain-link lifts to shield customers from the necessary grease. 1950's innovation that worked fine.

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajhjr View Post

Thanks everyone for the feedback on this topic. While my initial interest was trying to figure is there was something "special" about Sugar Mountain, I also thought the "inherent risk" language was a little odd. Thanks to CJO for the local insight to the fact that is not a big problem at the area. I live in the Midwest but grew up skiing out West so I realize skiing at Sugar Mountain or another resort in the area may not be overwhelming but hey if I can ski a day anywhere it is a good day.I appreciate all the insights.

"inherent risk" comes from the lawyer speak for the ski resorts when they have to be careful exactly what they say for liability.  

So that's where the term comes from and comes along with doctrine and tons of caselaw on the exact phrasing. 

 

Search "inherent risk ski" in google and you see that exact phrase coming up.

 

Maybe it's not used exactly correctly (I'm not a lawyer), but I could imagine that the manager at the mountain just picked up that phrase from the ski release legalese, back of the lift ticket, or other lawsuit they might have been involved with,  in order to mirror it to those statements.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Maybe ["inherent risk" is] not used exactly correctly (I'm not a lawyer), but I could imagine that the manager at the mountain just picked up that phrase from the ski release legalese, back of the lift ticket, or other lawsuit they might have been involved with,  in order to mirror it to those statements.

 

IANAL either, but there is very likely a state law saying that ski resorts are not responsible for anything that is an 'inherent risk' of skiing.  This was done in most states with ski resorts after a few high-profile cases where resorts were successfully sued for large amounts of money by injured skiers back in the 70s and 80s.

 

However, the determination of what is an 'inherent risk' is up to a court or the lawmakers in the state, not the resort.  They can call something an inherent risk if they want, but that doesn't mean it really is one!

post #36 of 36

The other week when we had the 53F temps on the hill, my yellow TNF got lots of grease spots. the following weekend I took some Dawn dish soap and pre-treated the stains. Let it sit for a few minutes and then throw it in the washer by itself with a liquid soap and washer it. Washed it again and then dryed it. About 98% of the stains came out. You have to look hard to see them.

 

 

Yes grease from the chair lifts is part of warm weather skiing. Get over it.

 

Or you could do like we did this past weekend, the temp was 4F at lunch time. No grease from this weekend...and the nice 20+mph wind kept the snow refreshed.

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