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I just spent two days at Stowe with Matt Boyd, PSIA National team member - here is the key thought... - Page 4

post #91 of 93

May I refresh the thread with the content of the Original Post?

 

[quote} At a "Dev Team Prep" clinic at Stowe last week with Matt. 

 

Key thought for two days: athletic stance is probably much lower than you think it is; shin angle should match spine angle (fore-aft).

 

Any thoughts?

 

We worked this through a series of drills: one legged railroad track turns, one-footed garlands, sequential converging hop turns, etc.  I came away a believer.  I skied much better with a lower, more athletic stance. [end quote]

 

MY POST  was in complete agreement with this expression. i.e. Scott Schmidt  had been identified to me as a skier that keeps a " stance much lower than you think".   And I am inspired by his skiing.

 

And if a troll may.  Let me extract for the posting by B. Barns ( a fun guy to ski with!)

 

[quote}I think it is a vast over-simplification to suggest that this alignment should always occur at turn initiation, or at any other part of the turn, for that matter. I do think it is a good rule of thumb for the athletic "ready" stance--but like the concept of stance in any sport, it describes an attitude of readiness to move, readiness for the actions your sport and the situation demands. "Stance" does not describe the movements of the sport itself. Take tennis, for example. The "ready stance" of tennis is best described as the attitude of the tennis player before he plays--as when waiting for a serve. When actually playing and moving around the court, that "position" occurs rarely, if ever.

[end quote]

 

But,  since ego is a difficult conversationalist,  I accept the impass.  A troll, if you see it so.


Edited by Cgrandy - 4/6/13 at 7:17pm
post #92 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post

May I refresh the thread with the content of the Original Post?

 

[quote} At a "Dev Team Prep" clinic at Stowe last week with Matt. 

 

Key thought for two days: athletic stance is probably much lower than you think it is; shin angle should match spine angle (fore-aft).

 

Any thoughts?

 

We worked this through a series of drills: one legged railroad track turns, one-footed garlands, sequential converging hop turns, etc.  I came away a believer.  I skied much better with a lower, more athletic stance. [end quote]

 

MY POST  was in complete agreement with this expression. i.e. Scott Schmidt  had been identified to me as a skier that keeps a " stance much lower than you think".   And I am inspired by his skiing.

 

And if a troll may.  Let me extract for the posting by B. Barns ( a fun guy to ski with!)

 

[quote}I think it is a vast over-simplification to suggest that this alignment should always occur at turn initiation, or at any other part of the turn, for that matter. I do think it is a good rule of thumb for the athletic "ready" stance--but like the concept of stance in any sport, it describes an attitude of readiness to move, readiness for the actions your sport and the situation demands. "Stance" does not describe the movements of the sport itself. Take tennis, for example. The "ready stance" of tennis is best described as the attitude of the tennis player before he plays--as when waiting for a serve. When actually playing and moving around the court, that "position" occurs rarely, if ever.

[end quote]

 

But,  since ego is a difficult conversationalist,  I accept the impass.  A troll, if you see it so.

Sorry, what I said was a little strong. I agree with the idea that if someone is in too tall a stance, lowering it will help them, but lowering it too far has a negative effect as well. There are obviously situations where having your hips very close to your skis is good, like in moguls, but only for a moment. 

post #93 of 93

If I may add something of my own experience.

 

When trying different things,  If one does not go to extremes, it will be a long path to the discovery of the best .

 

That is,  If one habitually skis "too Tall", then only coming down a little, will not yield results as rapidly as when would would try an opposite extreme.

 

It's just the way I work,  But I go by how things FEEL, and not everyone is so inclined.

 

 

 

From observation, I can say more skiers ski too tall than too low

 

Heads up,  but bend the knees!

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