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I just spent two days at Stowe with Matt Boyd, PSIA National team member - here is the key thought... - Page 3

post #61 of 93

Maybe they should update the Sybervision vid with the new ski technology and style adapted to the new tech.
 

post #62 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

I've always been shocked at the number of Brits who vacation in the Eastern US. I supposed if one is not an advanced level skier that the shorter travel, lodging and apres ski at Killington are either "good enough" or more attractive than going to say Summit County, but I still don't understand it. I've heard that better ski schools is a drawing factor for the Brits, but I don't see how the Killington ski school is any better than Vail or Keystone. Certainly language would appear to be a big plus for coming to the US, but in my experience speaking English is not a problem in the Alps. There is something going on here. The PSIA VIPS say that it is our guest centered teaching approach. If that is true, it's funny how we get so bent out of shape arguing over technical details. Personally, I'm just going to start whistling Dixie.

 

I am having my yearly dose of British kids this week. The kids I have right now are on their 5th or 6th school ski trip and this is their first one in the US. They have previously been in Austria and France. They say that they are "well chuffed" and that this is the best trip they have ever had. I asked them what they like about Stowe, VT so much and they said that it is largely that every trail is different, they felt that all of the pistes in Europe feel the same, but that each trail here has it's own character and that the woods skiing is very "cheeky", they love it. They also told me that in one of their previous trips to Austria, all of the instructors were Slovenians who spoke no English, so language is a factor. As for NYC/Boston, they said they'd rather ski two more days and skip NYC.

post #63 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

I think the professional part applies best to how the members treat their commitment to teaching. This thread is a good example of the kind of effort we put in to improve ourselves. The financial aspect has been beat to death in other threads. In the US, IMHO the public will find a significant difference (on average) between the quality of a lesson from a PSIA member than from a non-member. The "P" has some meaning and value here. My perception is that the difference between top level certification requirements for ISIA and PSIA is driven mostly by cultural/business factors. It's easy to pass judgment that US instructors are of lower quality than international instructors. It's harder to look at the differences and see that they are not due to a lack of skill or professionalism. There is room for growth here.

 

I've always been shocked at the number of Brits who vacation in the Eastern US. I supposed if one is not an advanced level skier that the shorter travel, lodging and apres ski at Killington are either "good enough" or more attractive than going to say Summit County, but I still don't understand it. I've heard that better ski schools is a drawing factor for the Brits, but I don't see how the Killington ski school is any better than Vail or Keystone. Certainly language would appear to be a big plus for coming to the US, but in my experience speaking English is not a problem in the Alps. There is something going on here. The PSIA VIPS say that it is our guest centered teaching approach. If that is true, it's funny how we get so bent out of shape arguing over technical details. Personally, I'm just going to start whistling Dixie.

 

 

why would you travel further for much less snow?

 

My guess is stowe has higher percentage of L3 instructors than those colorado places. I am seriously sick of people thinking Colorado or any place out west is the end all to all to good skiing.

post #64 of 93

My Brits this week told me they love the trees and the trails at our mountains (as opposed to skiing above tree line), they love the food here because it's more like what they are used to, and they especially like ourbreakfasts  (Italy only offers pasta), and we are more friendly here in the States than the people elsewhere.  Their chaperone told me we have a higher drinking age here (well, that explains it) and we speak English.  Everyone was excited about visiting Boston or NYC.

post #65 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

I am having my yearly dose of British kids this week. The kids I have right now are on their 5th or 6th school ski trip and this is their first one in the US. They have previously been in Austria and France. They say that they are "well chuffed" and that this is the best trip they have ever had. I asked them what they like about Stowe, VT so much and they said that it is largely that every trail is different, they felt that all of the pistes in Europe feel the same, but that each trail here has it's own character and that the woods skiing is very "cheeky", they love it. They also told me that in one of their previous trips to Austria, all of the instructors were Slovenians who spoke no English, so language is a factor. As for NYC/Boston, they said they'd rather ski two more days and skip NYC.

Could you translate that??

post #66 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Could you translate that??

 

It seems to mean "very happy". When I first heard it, I thought it was the opposite.

post #67 of 93

Well that's great. Interesting about "every piste the same" in the Alps.

Glad they're having a good time and you're not limited to speaking only Slovenian.

post #68 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

why would you travel further for much less snow?

 

My guess is stowe has higher percentage of L3 instructors than those colorado places. I am seriously sick of people thinking Colorado or any place out west is the end all to all to good skiing.

 

Really? Not saying there's not, as I've never been and don't know, but my perception of east coast instruction is that most people who are serious about it (ie fulltime level 3+s) leave for the west and the majority of people instructing there tend to be hobby instructors and guys who are tied there by family. Is the pay/work/snow actually ok there? From what I've heard If I was going to work in the States again I would not even consider the east coast. 

post #69 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

 

Really? Not saying there's not, as I've never been and don't know, but my perception of east coast instruction is that most people who are serious about it (ie fulltime level 3+s) leave for the west and the majority of people instructing there tend to be hobby instructors and guys who are tied there by family. Is the pay/work/snow actually ok there? From what I've heard If I was going to work in the States again I would not even consider the east coast. 

 

Never underestimate two things, Jim. One, population, and a monied population. There are a lot of teaching hours to be had from my understanding of things. Two, the passion and ability of those 'hobby' instructors. Many were full timers when younger who have moved on but still teach to stay connected. There are many great summer rec opportunities in the east for a multi sport person as well that can be attractive. For racing, the best almost always have a connection to the east at some point via the ski academies. Not all for sure, but many. Ms. Shiffren being the latest, brightest.

post #70 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

 

Never underestimate two things, Jim. One, population, and a monied population. There are a lot of teaching hours to be had from my understanding of things. Two, the passion and ability of those 'hobby' instructors. Many were full timers when younger who have moved on but still teach to stay connected. There are many great summer rec opportunities in the east for a multi sport person as well that can be attractive. For racing, the best almost always have a connection to the east at some point via the ski academies. Not all for sure, but many. Ms. Shiffren being the latest, brightest.

Oh, of course good skiers come from there, and good instructors too, it's just most of the good instructors I know from the east coast, now work elsewhere and don't have too much positive to say about it. I was wondering why Stowe might have more level 3s than a CO resort. 

post #71 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post
. I was wondering why Stowe might have more level 3s than a CO resort. 

Because we get more snow???

post #72 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

why would you travel further for much less snow?

 

My guess is stowe has higher percentage of L3 instructors than those colorado places. I am seriously sick of people thinking Colorado or any place out west is the end all to all to good skiing.

It's obvious that "snow" is only one factor in destination choice for both the Brits and me. I've chosen East coast for vacation skiing over the Rockies before. Once. In general, one has better odds of more mountain and more and better snow in the Western US than the Eastern US. So if snow is a big factor in destination choice, I don't understand choosing East as a destination vacation. That's why I asked the question. I'm beginning to see some of the answers I was looking for. Although I prefer the West, I ski much more in the East for various reasons. So me asking why is a stupid question. In my 40 + (cough) years of skiing I've skied in the rain East, West and the Alps and I've skied in powder East, West and the Alps. I've had as much fun in the back bowls at Vail as at a tiny little resort built on a trash dump (no names mentioned Sugarcreek). It's all good. But I am a sick puppy. There are plenty of ski hills out west that are smaller than some of the Eastern resorts. Still I won't wonder at anyone who has been to Vail who thinks that is the end all to good skiing if they are comparing that to Sugarcreek, Powder Ridge or my front yard after Snowmageddon.

 

I also suspect Stowe has a higher percentage of level 3 pros. I suspect it is much higher. Vail/BC ski school is over 1000 instructors. Aspen might give Stowe a run for it's money though.

post #73 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Oh, of course good skiers come from there, and good instructors too, it's just most of the good instructors I know from the east coast, now work elsewhere and don't have too much positive to say about it. I was wondering why Stowe might have more level 3s than a CO resort. 

 

I suppose the ones that leave wouldn't have nice things to say, the ones that stay would.

post #74 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

I suppose the ones that leave wouldn't have nice things to say, the ones that stay would.

Fair enough, I know a few who stayed that said it wasn't all that great either. Have you ever taught in other states? What were the positives and negatives?

post #75 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Fair enough, I know a few who stayed that said it wasn't all that great either. Have you ever taught in other states? What were the positives and negatives?

 

I have not, I am perfectly content right here where I am. Since I don't know that much about other ski schools, I won't say that we have more high cert instructors, but I have been to lineups where there were only L3 and above. 

post #76 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

 

Really? Not saying there's not, as I've never been and don't know, but my perception of east coast instruction is that most people who are serious about it (ie fulltime level 3+s) leave for the west and the majority of people instructing there tend to be hobby instructors and guys who are tied there by family. Is the pay/work/snow actually ok there? From what I've heard If I was going to work in the States again I would not even consider the east coast. 

 

 

well for one stowe gets more snow than place in central colorado on average. Our snowmaking covers more terrain as well. if I knew vail or Copper as well as I know stowe very few people beat me to the snow in stowe.

 

Pay is meh but living is cheaper, it one downside to here, I bet I can make more at certain mountains out west.. I work nearly all the time here but I have a VERY high on the ranking scale here. I ll make 10 k  plus a couple grand in tips this season. I realize that working at Beaver Creek or Deer Valley would net me much more money but it would mean less skiing time, probably less powder skiing time, and much more expensive living. If I ever leave here is will be for Jackson or Steamboat or returning to LCC.

 

as for L3s I said higher percentange. Not more big difference we have small ski school of 320 coaches vs a place like Vail with 1000 plus coaches.

 

another plus we open at 7:30 or 8:00 and I can almost always get a couple chairs before a powder day. My understanding is at say jackson hole the early gondolas/trams only run on non powder days.  Snowbird had early trams on powder days but you had to go with the employe group and overall its not as free or as east as catching a early public chair at stowe.

post #77 of 93

At Cannon there are:

 

90 alpine instructors

37 snowboard instructors.  

Of those 127 instructors, there are:

 

2 National Demo Teamers 

3 Examiners 

18 Level IIIs

17 Level IIs.

 

Not too bad.

post #78 of 93

They say a Boyd in hand is worth two in the Cannon.

post #79 of 93

roflmao.gifroflmao.gif

post #80 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

well for one stowe gets more snow than place in central colorado on average. Our snowmaking covers more terrain as well. if I knew vail or Copper as well as I know stowe very few people beat me to the snow in stowe.

 

Pay is meh but living is cheaper, it one downside to here, I bet I can make more at certain mountains out west.. I work nearly all the time here but I have a VERY high on the ranking scale here. I ll make 10 k  plus a couple grand in tips this season. I realize that working at Beaver Creek or Deer Valley would net me much more money but it would mean less skiing time, probably less powder skiing time, and much more expensive living. If I ever leave here is will be for Jackson or Steamboat or returning to LCC.

 

as for L3s I said higher percentange. Not more big difference we have small ski school of 320 coaches vs a place like Vail with 1000 plus coaches.

 

another plus we open at 7:30 or 8:00 and I can almost always get a couple chairs before a powder day. My understanding is at say jackson hole the early gondolas/trams only run on non powder days.  Snowbird had early trams on powder days but you had to go with the employe group and overall its not as free or as east as catching a early public chair at stowe.

Interesting to hear, I know CO is a little dry, but surprised the east coast can get more. It's funny trying to get the balance between skiing and work right, it's normally easy in Niseko because there's amazing night skiing, but at times this year I found myself working so much (busiest week was 57 hours) that I had no energy to ski after work. 

 

I didn't realise, I guess with 320 coaches the percentage could be a lot higher, same with Cannon, that's pretty good they have so many demo team/examiners, but funny they have so few level 2s. 

 

You ever thought about Aspen? I have a lot of friends there, and it sounds like a cool company to work for, but they have had a few dry years in a row it seems.  

post #81 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Interesting to hear, I know CO is a little dry, but surprised the east coast can get more. It's funny trying to get the balance between skiing and work right, it's normally easy in Niseko because there's amazing night skiing, but at times this year I found myself working so much (busiest week was 57 hours) that I had no energy to ski after work. 

 

I didn't realise, I guess with 320 coaches the percentage could be a lot higher, same with Cannon, that's pretty good they have so many demo team/examiners, but funny they have so few level 2s. 

 

You ever thought about Aspen? I have a lot of friends there, and it sounds like a cool company to work for, but they have had a few dry years in a row it seems.  

 

 

Its not can get more. On average we do get more......

 

 

aspen gets far less snow than stowe, with acost of living that is though the roof. aspen has had 100 less inches of snow this year than stowe. they average 300 a year vs our 330.... Go to stowe for powder go to aspen well for what is most likely hardpack groomers/bumps.

post #82 of 93

My big gripe about New England is the heartbreaker storm -- starts out with lots of powder, but the trailing edge is rain.  

 

It does occur to me having written this, that the work-around is to ski during the storm.

 

And not to give up, I guess.  Back in the 80's when I had a ski house share at Killingtion, I remember going to sleep to powder but waking up to rain and going back to sleep.  But later I was talking to someone who told me I messed up -- the rain / snow line was at the parking lot.

 

I also remember skiing 18 inches of waterlogged blue snow because I was mad and I was not going to give it up.  I discovered that even Devils Fiddle was not steep enough to move forward, so I slogged back to the packed down area.

post #83 of 93

But not to be too negative -- I have had many good powder days in New England.  You have to grab them when they happen.  I guess that is true everywhere now -- if not for weather, then because of other skiers.

post #84 of 93

I have been strongly influenced by a comment made in a Warren Miller flick regarding the skiing style of Scott Schmidt.

 

That he had the shortest distance between hips and ankles of anyone W.M> had seen.

 

Now when I'm feeling "less strong",  I lower my hips.

 

I'ts not a technique,  It's an ATTITUDE!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dooEVgLOybo

 

dont miss Minute 3.40.

 

Seems to work ;-)

 

cheers

post #85 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post

I have been strongly influenced by a comment made in a Warren Miller flick regarding the skiing style of Scott Schmidt.

 

That he had the shortest distance between hips and ankles of anyone W.M> had seen.

 

Now when I'm feeling "less strong",  I lower my hips.

 

I'ts not a technique,  It's an ATTITUDE!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dooEVgLOybo

 

dont miss Minute 3.40.

 

Seems to work ;-)

 

cheers

 

 

 

can you explain tpo the board the physics of how lowering your hips makes you stronger?

 

 

well in a way it does it does strenghten your leg muscles....

post #86 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

Its not can get more. On average we do get more......

 

 

aspen gets far less snow than stowe, with acost of living that is though the roof. aspen has had 100 less inches of snow this year than stowe. they average 300 a year vs our 330.... Go to stowe for powder go to aspen well for what is most likely hardpack groomers/bumps.

30 inches isn't that big a difference.. I work in arguably the snowiest place in the world and I'd still consider a switch to Aspen if they did H2Bs. Obviously you really like stowe, and that's cool, each to their own. 

post #87 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

 

can you explain tpo the board the physics of how lowering your hips makes you stronger?

 

 

well in a way it does it does strenghten your leg muscles....

To simplify

 

A VERY athletic stance.

 

Head up,  A position of strength

 

"Gird thy loins"

 

You might try it

post #88 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post

To simplify

 

A VERY athletic stance.

 

Head up,  A position of strength

 

"Gird thy loins"

 

You might try it

You might feel like you simplified something there, but really nothing you said makes much sense, I don't see too much to aspire to in the video you posted, doing that on straight skis is cool, but I like to actually land off cliffs and not jump turn all the time. The concept of getting your hips closer to your feet isn't a useful one. 

post #89 of 93

Jim

 

If it does not work for you I suggest that you do not do it.

 

The video was just the first one that google returned,  no other implication.  (though I really can relate to the 3:40 sequence ;-)

 

Which part of "it's not a technique,  it's an attitude" confuses you?

 

"Bend zee knees,  five dollars pleeze"

post #90 of 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post

Jim

 

If it does not work for you I suggest that you do not do it.

 

The video was just the first one that google returned,  no other implication.  (though I really can relate to the 3:40 sequence ;-)

 

"Bend zee knees,  five dollars pleeze"

 

 

you might be the best troll ever?

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