or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Who is the Greatest Skier Right NOW?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Who is the Greatest Skier Right NOW? - Page 17

post #481 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I don't know why you keep talking about racing backgrounds like I was dismissing them - since the discussion involves two skiers with racing backgrounds.  Where on earth did you get that in any of my posts?

I was merely responding to the comment that Angel wasn't "even in the same league" which is totally ridiculous.  Those big AK lines take a hell of a lot more than just balls.  Line scouting and slough management is a skill.

No doubt both are very skilled skiers, however technically they are not even close. There is a bit of a difference between racing background and dominating the WC. Collinson is a very good freeskier, but Shiffrin is a once in a generation phenomenon. Yes slough management is a skill, but honestly, it's not that hard. Picking a winning line in the gates is a lot harder, even though it does not seem so. The risk equation is obviously a lot more complicated. Of course both of these women are way better skiers than I would ever be, so we can keep armvhair quarterbacking.
post #482 of 492
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Yes slough management is a skill, but honestly, it's not that hard.

 

:bs:

 

A ton of pro big mountain skiers would disagree with you on that statement.  You're being pretty dismissive of someone who won the FWT the only two years she participated.  Skiing those lines isn't about perfect technique like running gates - it's about being adaptable to the terrain and making all kinds of different functional turns.  And that is perfect technique for the situation.

 

post #483 of 492

I think it's safe to say that most, if not every one of the well known big mountain skiers has had pretty extensive coaching and competitive (race, moguls, etc..) experience somewhere along the line. The common resultant is that they know how to learn, study, focus, and train to apply outstanding fundamentals and 1% athleticism to whatever task becomes the focus of their attentions. They are also keenly aware of what they don't know which is something the rest of us 99%'s can always do better regarding the limitis of our own understanding and abilities.


Edited by markojp - 5/23/16 at 4:35pm
post #484 of 492

That one percent, in my experience, is more; unless you mean those in the top 1% of natural ability, which is likely.  Hard to quantify, but it's a lot like the skill positions on the football field:  some folks have the tools, others not as much.  Dedication and careful effort can make a difference, but mostly if that basic athletic ability level is there.  

 

For example, I raced against a friend in grade school and junior high whose dad had been the diving coach of the national team.   My friend was very fast at the 50 yard dash, competitive city wide - quick twitch muscles, so to speak.  He was a star fullback, though short.   He was a scholarship level trampoline and diving guy.   He just naturally had amazing body control as a given.   He skied very, very well, did well at racing but went into tramp competition, back then.

  

Again, in high school and college, a buddy I skied often with, was a natural, from an early age.  He grew up at a ski area.  He could make most any ski do most anything well, effortlessly: 220 downhill skis in knee deep powder through tight trees, no sweat.  He was captain of the Cornell racing team, nationally ranked, became a longtime coach of the race team at that ski area near Fairbanks, Alaska (Alyeska?), as I understand it.  

 

Also, from what I've read, Sean Pettit was the best of those he skied and competed with from a very young age:  at 14 better than the young adults and most adults he competed against and skied with, pretty much.  That doesn't mean he didn't learn to get better.  It's just he had a foundation of ability that few have.   

post #485 of 492
And then 's Logan Pehota who gets a bit of value added insight from his dad. smile.gif
post #486 of 492
Thread Starter 

I guess what I take issue with is the presumption that any highly skilled racer could just step up and slay big mountain lines.  It's pretty insulting of the skills and ability needed to do so.  Are they more likely to be able to because of those fundamental skills and technique from racing?  Absolutely.  But it's far from a given the way some people act.

post #487 of 492
Of course WC skiers have the skills. They don't have big mountain AK experience, because coaches, sponsors and national teams won't let them. They have millions invested in these athletes and don't want them injured.

I can just about guarantee, If any BM skiers had been winning WC races, they'd still be racing.
Nobis's best WC result was a 9th and he becomes the "father of the freeride movement."
Mancuso get's a 3rd in her first FWT event and goes back to racing.
.
post #488 of 492
Thread Starter 

^^ That may have been true 15-20 years ago but there's a lot of younger skiers who are good at racing early on but get bored with it (or burn out) and would rather ski the whole mountain and focus on the pursuit of powder.

post #489 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I guess what I take issue with is the presumption that any highly skilled racer could just step up and slay big mountain lines.  It's pretty insulting of the skills and ability needed to do so.  Are they more likely to be able to because of those fundamental skills and technique from racing?  Absolutely.  But it's far from a given the way some people act.

No. There's a difference between merely highly skilled and 1%'ers. I also think there aren't many people posting here who've skied much with ex WC'ers or current free ride tour folks, or have had the opportunity to simply watch them ski much at 1:1. They don't seem to have these type of arguments amongst each other as there's plenty of mutual respect to go around. Unfortunately, we, the hoi polloi, tend to chose sides that affirm our own personal experiences on snow and feel the need for 'umbrage' when anything less than satisfactory levels of 'stroke' regarding our own backgrounds aren't in the posted offerings.

smile.gif
Edited by markojp - 5/25/16 at 11:35pm
post #490 of 492
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

I also think there aren't many people posting here who've skied much with ex WC'ers or current free ride tour folks, or have had the opportunity to simply watch them ski much at 1:1. They don't seem to have these type of arguments amongst each other as there's plenty of mutual respect to go around.

 

Exactly...

post #491 of 492
I've had the privelege to ski with a recent female WC skier (GS winnner and podium skier at the World Championships). And ... wow! It's hard to even fathom the power, speed and control those guys are drilled to. You may think you're good but, no..
post #492 of 492
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

I guess what I take issue with is the presumption that any highly skilled racer could just step up and slay big mountain lines.  It's pretty insulting of the skills and ability needed to do so.  Are they more likely to be able to because of those fundamental skills and technique from racing?  Absolutely.  But it's far from a given the way some people act.

Not insulting at all. I'd bet you Travis Ganong would be competive with just about any BM skier on a gnarly line. (There is an explicit admission of that in Squallywood by the way, even though it's a few years old by now). Your own experience should probably tell you all you need to know, since you have seen plenty of big mountain kids and race kids side by side at Squaw and Alpine. They ski pretty much the same terrain, the only difference is that race teams often do it on race skis. I am not saying that one group is better than the other, it is silly to even discuss it, but any racer who went through a decent ski program that emphasizes a freeskiing component for reactive skills should be well equipped for big mountain skiing. And many do after their racing career is done. A turn is a turn.

what I take issue with is the current trend in big mountain skiing that deemphasizes technique and favors more risk taking. Trying to outrun avalanches makes for a thrilling footage to accompany beer drinking on college campuses, but it is bad for ski technique and is really bad for you if you screw up. Thus I was actually not that excited with Angel Collinson segments. Yes, it takes a lot of technical skills and talent to control skis and manage terrain at those speeds, but I just don't think it takes the sport in the right direction. But that's a discussion for another thread.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Who is the Greatest Skier Right NOW?