or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How cold is too cold to ski?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How cold is too cold to ski? - Page 3

post #61 of 89

Today Stowe was -18 with 30 knot winds. Pretty cold, but I've definitely skied colder. Snow was slow and the skis I waxed with Holmenkol Ultra yesterday were burned by lunch time. Yay.

post #62 of 89

Well with the Cold weather we just had recently, WV recorded -22 with windchill today and they didn't even open because it was just naturally cold with just a 10 degree windchill. So standing, it was around -12 degrees.  I've skied in -30 conditions (Windchill Adjusted) and they closed the top of the mountain because they didn't want any employees to get hurt/sick/frostbite from the cold.

post #63 of 89
Thread Starter 

Another positive of these brutally low temps is that the snow they can make seems to be of a little better quality (if that's even possible) than snow they make when it's say 20 degrees outside.

 

It doesn't seem as gritty at least...

post #64 of 89

Wildcat, NH is closed today and tomorrow because of the cold. Windchill at Mt. Washington this morning was -85

post #65 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

Today Stowe was -18 with 30 knot winds. Pretty cold, but I've definitely skied colder. Snow was slow and the skis I waxed with Holmenkol Ultra yesterday were burned by lunch time. Yay.

This am, Boston was 6 degrees. You guys must be getting stiff Gore Tex about now...biggrin.gif

post #66 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by focker View Post

Another positive of these brutally low temps is that the snow they can make seems to be of a little better quality (if that's even possible) than snow they make when it's say 20 degrees outside.

 

It doesn't seem as gritty at least...

 

Manmade snow definitely comes out better at very low temperatures.  Probably has to do with how quickly the ice crystals form in the air, but that's not my area of expertise.

post #67 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by focker View Post

Another positive of these brutally low temps is that the snow they can make seems to be of a little better quality (if that's even possible) than snow they make when it's say 20 degrees outside.

 

It doesn't seem as gritty at least...

 

Manmade snow definitely comes out better at very low temperatures.  Probably has to do with how quickly the ice crystals form in the air, but that's not my area of expertise.

 

I remember reading an interview with some snowmakers from I think it was Loon Mountain. Ideally they want it to be 27 degrees or colder to blow snow, but it can go as low as it wants and its not going to change a whole lot.

post #68 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

I remember reading an interview with some snowmakers from I think it was Loon Mountain. Ideally they want it to be 27 degrees or colder to blow snow, but it can go as low as it wants and its not going to change a whole lot.

 

It definitely comes out of the guns a LOT wetter in the high 20s or low 30s.  Maybe below a certain point it stops mattering in terms of the quality.

 

At Wachusett it seems like they are able to make snow faster at really low (<20F) temperatures.  Not sure if they are tweaking the air/water ratio or what.

post #69 of 89

Yesterday I discovered the wonder of toe warmers -- little envelopes of comfort that stick to your socks and let you stay out as long as you want, even when it's nasty cold. It was -10F, sunny and breezy again yesterday, and the snow conditions were ideal for a little eastern hill (groomed granular -- fast, firm, consistent, completely free of icy spots, and nearly free of other skiers). It was so damn much fun. And pretty comfortable, thanks to toe warmers, hand warmers, layers of miracle fabrics, a neoprene face mask, fleece balaclava, helmet and goggles. While the TV weather guy goes on about the deadly wind chill and warning the populace to stay indoors, we've had three of our best days of the year on the nearly deserted hills.

post #70 of 89

Couldn't figure out why nobody was on the tram one morning at Jackson Hole until we arrived at the top... It was -14*F... Skid one run and called it a day...

 

The previous winter at Steamboat Springs, the temp reached -49*F on nine separate nights, but at the top of the mountain it was +15... The last mile of the last run of the day was a killer because the inversion layer prevented the base temperature from rising above -12...

 

Hurry home for a hot buttered rum...

 

GLAZO


Edited by Glazo - 1/25/13 at 3:05pm
post #71 of 89

The temperature dropped to +8* F last week here in the California high desert, so I set up some sprinklers in our crabapple tree and grew some icicles...

 

 Pretty wierd, yeah?

 

 

I love winter... GLAZO

post #72 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glazo View Post

The temperature dropped to +8* F last week here in the California high desert, so I set up some sprinklers in our crabapple tree and grew some icicles...

 

 Pretty wierd, yeah?

 

 

I love winter... GLAZO

 

 

Nice idea, I like it. Think you could get a higher quality shot and maybe a bit farther away so you can see the whole tree?

 

worthless.gif

post #73 of 89

 This is lit by 2 1000W halogens...

 

I grew icicles on three successive nights, 24*F, then 16*F, then 8*F... I shot approximately 260 photos and made some short videos... Some close, some far away, The tree still had 10 strings of LED lights from Christmas, so the ice formed around the lights creating a menagerie of color...

 

Here are a few more...

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

 

Nice idea, I like it. Think you could get a higher quality shot and maybe a bit farther away so you can see the whole tree?

 

worthless.gif

 

 

 

I am in Lancaster, about 70 miles north of Los Angeles, at 2350 ft above sea level... Temperature reached 114 a couple days last summer... I like being out doors in the winter... This experiment turned out so well, I am thinking about doing the entire yard next year...

 

1000 This is from last winter when we had a 10" snowstorm... I went out with a wheel barrow and imported enough snow from the neighbors yards to make the snowman... Then I covered him up with alpaca wool blankets during the day so he lasted almost a month... He is holding a new, unmounted pair of 207cm K-2-FOUR comps...

 

I formed the icicles in 5 hours... The water dripping from the tree made these intereting shapes on the grass blades...

 

 

This is most of the tree... Very striking when the sun hits...

 

 

Ahh... The good life... I am just an eccentric ceramic artist always searching for a new medium to explore...

 

I will probably enter some of these in one or two photo contests... If I can decide which one's are the best...LOL...

 

Glad you enjoyed them, tylrwnzl...

 

So, is there any skiing in Costa Rica...???

 

GLAZO

 

PS... I like your Utah shots... August 2012...??? LOL...

post #74 of 89

I remember skiing Jackson hole for 4 days and the high was -11..... But nothing compares to Loveland ski resort in December with high winds... gets cold as hell up there...  

post #75 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glazo View Post

 This is lit by 2 1000W halogens...

 

I grew icicles on three successive nights, 24*F, then 16*F, then 8*F... I shot approximately 260 photos and made some short videos... Some close, some far away, The tree still had 10 strings of LED lights from Christmas, so the ice formed around the lights creating a menagerie of color...

 

Here are a few more...

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

 

Nice idea, I like it. Think you could get a higher quality shot and maybe a bit farther away so you can see the whole tree?

 

worthless.gif

 

 

 

I am in Lancaster, about 70 miles north of Los Angeles, at 2350 ft above sea level... Temperature reached 114 a couple days last summer... I like being out doors in the winter... This experiment turned out so well, I am thinking about doing the entire yard next year...

 

1000 This is from last winter when we had a 10" snowstorm... I went out with a wheel barrow and imported enough snow from the neighbors yards to make the snowman... Then I covered him up with alpaca wool blankets during the day so he lasted almost a month... He is holding a new, unmounted pair of 207cm K-2-FOUR comps...

 

I formed the icicles in 5 hours... The water dripping from the tree made these intereting shapes on the grass blades...

 

 

This is most of the tree... Very striking when the sun hits...

 

 

Ahh... The good life... I am just an eccentric ceramic artist always searching for a new medium to explore...

 

I will probably enter some of these in one or two photo contests... If I can decide which one's are the best...LOL...

 

Glad you enjoyed them, tylrwnzl...

 

So, is there any skiing in Costa Rica...???

 

GLAZO

 

PS... I like your Utah shots... August 2012...??? LOL...

 Only water skiing. They've only had snow once in 93 years on top of a very high volcano. That's why I head back to the States for a month in two weeks so I can ski.gif

post #76 of 89

up to -15C for me..

 

coldest ski experience was during a cold snap 20 yrs ago...it so happened when a group of friends 

and i had planned for some time a ski trip to mt tremblant (we were living in toronto)..was

already -20c ish, hoping it would break by the time we got there (good luck  with that).

 

....by the time we got there this cold front only got worse a and it was -30c

...the next day, atop one of the runs, there was a thermometer that read -45C with the windchill....friggin' brutal

...had to cover every part of my body on the way down...that was it for the day so a great excuse

to enjoy that famous Quebecois apres with beer and poutine by the fireplace.


Edited by canali - 1/27/13 at 7:56am
post #77 of 89
20 below zero . 0 minus 5 ok assuming no high winds .
post #78 of 89

The coldest I've done was about -20, but that was during the day, and while it was definitely very cold, we were fine.

 

This past Saturday night it was about -15 with the wind chill, but it felt so much colder. I don't know if it's a mental thing because it's dark out (no sun) and it feels colder, or what, but we were absolutely frozen. Of course our little East Coast hills often have VERY quick runs, so it felt like we'd wait in line for 1 minute, take 4 minutes going up, and then 45 seconds to ski back down. Our hamstrings were frozen from sitting on the lifts for so long. 

 

But hey, we've got a ~3 month ski season so we'll take what we can get :)

post #79 of 89

Coldest temperature I have skied was -35 C / -31F.  That was on a ski trip at Sunshine village, several years ago.  I thought to myself I might never have the means to

go back there again, so I forced myself to ski despite the cold.  All the tourists stayed in the lodge, there was absolutely no lineup for the chairs.  We had a great powder day too.

 

This year I have skied at -28C  / -18F at the ski station where I patrol.  Two or three runs, one hot chocolate. repeat.  It's not fun attending to an injured skier or snowboarder at these temperatures, we need to work swiftly because 1) the skier gets cold fast and may enter hypothermia if we take too long and 2) I remove my ski gloves and only wear nitrile gloves, and my fingers start hurting after 5-10 minutes.

 

You gotta ask yourself, how long can I survive without major frostbites should the chairlift stop functioning?  The article below states that at Sugarloaf it took more than an hour to evacuate all the skiers that were stranded in the broken chairlift:  http://blog.ctnews.com/snowzone/2010/12/29/chair-lift-accident-raises-concerns/

post #80 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo View Post

Coldest temperature I have skied was -35 C / -31F.  That was on a ski trip at Sunshine village, several years ago.  I thought to myself I might never have the means to

go back there again, so I forced myself to ski despite the cold.  All the tourists stayed in the lodge, there was absolutely no lineup for the chairs.  We had a great powder day too.

 

This year I have skied at -28C  / -18F at the ski station where I patrol.  Two or three runs, one hot chocolate. repeat.  It's not fun attending to an injured skier or snowboarder at these temperatures, we need to work swiftly because 1) the skier gets cold fast and may enter hypothermia if we take too long and 2) I remove my ski gloves and only wear nitrile gloves, and my fingers start hurting after 5-10 minutes.

 

You gotta ask yourself, how long can I survive without major frostbites should the chairlift stop functioning?  The article below states that at Sugarloaf it took more than an hour to evacuate all the skiers that were stranded in the broken chairlifthttp://blog.ctnews.com/snowzone/2010/12/29/chair-lift-accident-raises-concerns/

Oh Lord. I will now think of this whenever it's less than 0.  (I'm one of the biggest "worriers" ever...)

post #81 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo View Post

You gotta ask yourself, how long can I survive without major frostbites should the chairlift stop functioning?  The article below states that at Sugarloaf it took more than an hour to evacuate all the skiers that were stranded in the broken chairlift:  http://blog.ctnews.com/snowzone/2010/12/29/chair-lift-accident-raises-concerns/

I was stuck on a lift for almost an hour before it got going again, it was around 0F. Since then I carry a space blanket in my pocket all the time in case it happens again so I can at least minimize the windchill factor.
post #82 of 89

I was stuck for almost two hours on a lift at Snö mountain with already very cold toes before we got stuck. Fortunately it was about 20 degrees and the wind was a pain but not unbearable. 

post #83 of 89

I have a preference for single digit (F, either - or +).  I don't usually keep notes about the temperatures, I guess I should, but have been skiing when it's been -20F plus wind.  According to my notes for one day the windchill was -48F.  You just add more clothes.  I've had double face masks, double pants, and double coats.  It keeps the crowds away.  Very rarely has the wax issue been a big one.  Temperature has certainly not been a problem here this year.  If it had been, the viz would have been better. Lot of fog this year, even for us.

post #84 of 89

I was one of the few that skied Okemo about 12/13 years ago when the wind chill was -75F. There were only about a hand full of us that made it up before they closed for the day.

 

I have skied when the temp has been -29F, Salomon even had a Demo day one of those day's, Yep I was the first one to sign up for it that cold morning at Jackson Gore.

post #85 of 89

I had a lousy day of sking at Okemo, but I might go back again because the people were so nice. I mean NICE.

 

You don't find people like that in New York City.

post #86 of 89

Prolly around -10 or so (meh. nothing compared to many of you). Enjoyed a windchill of around -50 or so a couple weeks ago. Nothing a few extra layers and a thin skull cap under my helmet couldn't cure, although I couldn't feel my toes at the end of each trip up the lift. They'd usually regain feeling by the time I hit the bottom of the mountain. A trip to the lodge about every 1-2 hours or so for some hot chocolate and we were golden.

 

The best part of cold days? The mountains usually end up pretty empty, and you can have great powder allllll to yourself, often making first tracks on every run of the day. I'm always happy to deal with some numb extremities for that sort of payoff. However, I really need to buy some boot heaters for my wife. She gets cold way easier than me, but she's a champ and finds the cold to fun ration worth it. I <3 cold days!

post #87 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post

..... But nothing compares to Loveland ski resort in December with high winds... gets cold as hell up there...  

 

That's for sure! Man, you get off the lift at the top of the divide, and it's like you're in an arctic hurricane. I've never experienced winds quite like that elsewhere. Awesome place, but holy moly it can get crazy cold up top there. My first (and accidental) double black diamond of my life (when I was pretty much a beginner) was there. I got off the lift, intending to take the easy cat track down, and the wind was so nuts it straight blew me sideways and off into the bowl, which was totally windblown and icy at that point. That was not easy for a rookie for me back then, and I honestly wouldn't have wanted to ski that with matching conditions today. Was nuts.

 

I wonder how low their ambient and windchill temps get up there!

post #88 of 89

Last Friday 1/25/13, stepped off the Summitt Quad at Sugarbush and therometer said -18F. BRRRR! But managable. Skied all day with several stops in the lodge to warm up.  Hand and feet warmers, good mittens and neck warmers  were the order of the day. Was it my best day on the snow....no! But way better than being at work! biggrin.gif

post #89 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

 

That's for sure! Man, you get off the lift at the top of the divide, and it's like you're in an arctic hurricane. I've never experienced winds quite like that elsewhere. Awesome place, but holy moly it can get crazy cold up top there. My first (and accidental) double black diamond of my life (when I was pretty much a beginner) was there. I got off the lift, intending to take the easy cat track down, and the wind was so nuts it straight blew me sideways and off into the bowl, which was totally windblown and icy at that point. That was not easy for a rookie for me back then, and I honestly wouldn't have wanted to ski that with matching conditions today. Was nuts.

 

I wonder how low their ambient and windchill temps get up there!

You know its bad when they have giant wind fences....  

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How cold is too cold to ski?